BOMB/NAV 

Guestbook & War Stories

Feel free to type anything  you want.  War stories, where you were stationed at, who you are looking for etc.... Have fun.


Calling ... Mark (Haze) Hazel I'm a B/N guy ... D Models and in you post, you mentioned a very good friend of mine, Bill Badstibner, from Mckeesport, PA. Do you happen to have any email or address information?
Larry Bell <lawrencetbell@yahoo.com>
Springboro, oh USA -




GREAT SITE!! I was a BNS toad for many years. At Lowry 1960-1961. 5th A&E,Travis AFB CA 1961-1964. 7 Level School at Lowry 1964-1965. Back to Travis 1965-1967. Ellsworth 1967-1968 with a paid vacation to Guam Jan-Jun 1968. Then back to Lowry as, at that time, BNS instructor on FB-111. Then off to RAF Upper Heyford UK, F-111E Automatic Test Station Operator 1970-1974. Then back to my first and only love Bomb Nav at Castle AFB 1974-1976. Then to Luke as a WCS/INS FTD instructor on F-15's 1976-1978. 1978-1980 FTD F-16 WCS/INS instructor at Hill AFB UT. Retired in 1980. Went to work at Hill AFB in Civil Service (Feathermerchant). In 1984 transfered to Langley AFB to HQ TAC (later to be ACC) as the Functional Program Manager for the Automated Maintenance Data Collection System known as the Core Automated Maintenance System (CAMS). In 1999 I retired again for the final time and now just taking care of Honey Do's, Daddy Do's and Grandpa Do's. I would love to hear from fellow BNS troops. Reconized some of the names i.e. Dave Ross Travis 1961-67 and Earl Polly, Ellsworth 67-68. Keep up the good work on this site. Ben McCormick (Mac)
Ben McCormick <mccormic@visi.net>
Newport News, VA USA -




just got back from biloxi where we rode out tropical storm bill appropriately named for eirish i would guess, from his younger days. i don't know if his anatomical reference is appropriate to these people or not. i would have referred to them as penically challenged if i had to do it. jon is probably rather busy these days as i understand the new b-52 avionics update is in full test. digital avionics is a frustrating thing because the logic is always set to fault down after detecting an "error" a number of times. those of us who played analog (which is real time) had a troubleshooting advantage. in the digital realm we had error traps( which we didn't learn about in school ) you could read them by addressing the system and providing the octal readout to the test station guys. so much for the "advantages" of bite (built in test equipment) the b-1a had this giant digital madrec which was supposed to be the ultimate troubleshooter. in reality when the engines were firewalled on take off roll the limits of this thing were exceeded and a lot of the a/c signals would go out of their limits and would fault down (as far as this thing was concerned) and not report a subsequent "real" problem. i spent a month at rockwell in los angeles, "discussing " these problems with 1lt and 2 lt engineers who were so far out of the spectrum it would scare you. we had a 1 hour remove and replace requirement on all items and the flir/ir pod was not falling into the category. the chief engineer at rockwell got up during a meeting and proceeded to say nothing for 15 minutes regarding the problem. with all my suave and finessee that i could muster, i invited him to go up to the desert and watch the removal with me. he declined and cited prior commitments. sure hope jon isn't going thru any of that kind of stuff. but i bet there is some of it going around. i just realized it took me 27 years to vent my frustration over test programs. thanx for listening keep the faith alfie
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -



ever notice how the "dinky peckered" casino suckers never give their real email? must be like the arabs,hiding behind the women and kids skirts.
eirish <eirish1@attbi,com>
SAC, USA -


 

My initiation into bombnav started obviously enough at lowery AFB tech school. The most memorable characters were Mark Wich, Mike Nowak (Hi Mike) , Tom Whitney, and my BNS instructor Dennis Hopper. Hop as I remember his nickname, was a Great guy from the Louisiana Bayou, a fantastic instructor and had a ton of stories. Finally comes my day to go to my PCS Station and I land at Ontario airport just outside of Riverside Ca with butterflies in my stomach and one stripe on my arm. My paperwork said I’d meet a Sgt Jack Short at the airport as my reporting NCO. When I call, a very Terse Sgt Short tells me to take the bus to the main gate. So eventually, there I’m standing at the base main gate and Jack shows up in a small car, takes one look at me and says “Get your S***t in the car and shut the **** up. Gulp, this is not a good start I’m thinking to myself. The conversation on the way to VAQ was not what I’d call casual. He drops me off at VAQ, and Blammo, he’s Gone! I’m thinking this is not going to be a happy place. The next day a completely contrite Jack shows up and tells me the rest for the story. It seems that the night of my arrival was the first day back from his Honeymoon. (I.E. his first day home with his wife.) And her Dog (a Dachshund as I recall) was a little jealous of him. To Show his jealousy, when jack got into bed that night, the dog jumps up next to his pillow, Hikes up a leg and Pee’s right in his face. (Ahhh, Canine amore` )Then the phone rings with yours truly on the other line, waiting for a ride to the base. So ok jack, you had a good reason to be in a bad mood. Next was my meeting with the Amazing Joe Brown……
Mark T Hazel <mhazel@rochester.rr.com>
rochester, NY USA -
I forgot to mention Jack Short, Joel Carrol and Tom Whitney. Sorry guys!
Mark T Hazel <mhazel@rochester.rr.com>
rochester, ny USA -


Hey BNS Troops, Mark (Haze) Hazel here! I was stationed at March AFB from 77-80 with some of the most outstanding people I've ever met, and made friends that have lasted a lifetime. Cmsgt Joe Brown, Sherman Thomas, Bobbie Jones, Jim Welton, John (the hebe) Hebert, Don Nuss, Bill Badstibner, Bill (purpie) Brown, Chuck Wiser (chuckie baby), Lance Ingman, Doug Belt, Ray Harris, Johnnie Olson, Doug Belt, Chuck Wiser, Steve Riddle, Steve Eastwood, Mike Franco, Tim Papajohn, Mark Wich, Karen Opanesets, Doug Hamez, Jim Maddux, Joel, and Of course James Mcneese who remains a close friend. Hold on to your C-Gyros...Some great stories are-a comming!!
Mark T Hazel <mhazel@rochester.rr.com>
Rochester, NY USA -
Hi! I truly liked this work . You may feel free to check the pages created to promote on net betting .
money betting <colvoc_5053-jump@mail.nu>
USA -
RE: Goat at Loring, make that "the APs got involved".
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, pa USA -
When I was at Loring in 1954 the wing commander, BG Bertram Harrison, instituted a monthly rating system for the maintenance squadrons. The top rated squadron got an award and the lowest rated squadron got a goat, literally. They had a big ram with long hair and a beautiful set of curved horns. The squadron that got the goat for a month would then detail their worst screw-up to take care of the goat. One month the squadron in the barracks next to ours got the goat, and soon afteward the goat was found lying on the grass, dead. The base veterinarian was called to do an autopsy and determined that the goat had drowned. Then the SPs got involved and found that the kid detailed to the goat got all pissed off and drowned the goat in the mop basin in the utility room. The kid disappeared and I don't know what happened to him, but I don't imagine it was anything good.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner!@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, pa USA -
In the sunmmer of 1971 while stationed at Loring, a group of us were sunbathing outside our barracks. The SP Sqdn occupied a wing of the same building. A couple of them set up a small ramp beside the building and were jumping a dirt bike off of it. It was cool. Then one of them , bolstered by liquid courage, made an extremly fast run at the ramp , he sailed into the air and ran smack head on into the barracks. That was even cooler!!!
George Mogle <gmogle@earthlink.net>
Chambersburg , Pa USA -
You old guys ever run in to a tech rep named Larry Roach from Glasgow AFB. I think I got the Larry right, don't know for sure if Roach was his last name. Larry was the guy that taught us new 3 levels all about the MA6A/7A system aat Glasgow in the early 60's Just wondering what happened to him. take care
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, Wy USA -
This is a great site for the old soldiers to communicate with each others and share memories, I personally look at it almost every day to keep up with the current chatter it's because of this I resent these pill pushers from trying to muscle in. I get more than enough of these annoying spam "E" mails on my site with out having to see them here, to add insult to injury their web site even contains the tail no. of an old "D" model. I hope that I'm not the only one that feels this way.
Charlie White <cwhite@castles.com>
Fairfield, CA USA -


i caught it too bill just wanted to see if larson was big enuf to admit a typo faux up.
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
I'm a retired Bomb/Nav'er. Began with a year in the American Toy Company (ATC) at Lowry learning the "K" system (ASQ-38) April-Dec 1965. The first PCS assignment was at Walker AFB (1966-67), then on to Blytheville AFB (later Eaker) (1967-69); Ramey AFB (1969-71); Ellsworth AFB (1971-72). Then a long stay at Griffiss AFB (1973-81) and finally Castle AFB (1982-85). I ran across this site through a "Google" search... it was a bit like 'old home week'! I saw several names from my past travels around SAC. Long live the SAC-trained warriors!
Herb "Skip" Maunder <herbmm@frontiernet.net>
Rochester, NY USA -
Alf...Make that word TWISTING, as in "blessed are they who run around in circles, for they shall be called BIG WHEELS"
Bill <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -

define twiating!!!!!!!!!!
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
The rubber band driven B/N system was designated the AN/I4Q-2. Maintenance was a snap. Much of it consisted of twiating which both Bob and Alfie had a mind for. Of course that was much before my time.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park , CA USA -
The rubber band driven B/N system was designated the AN/I4Q-2. Maintenance was a snap. Much of it consisted of twiating which both Bob and Alfie had a mind for. Of course that was much before my time.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park , CA USA -
It is good to hear from so many Bomb Nav'ers. I went to Tech School at Lower from Jan 72-August 73. I went from there to Barksdale and remained there from 73-79 when I was selected to go to Edwards to support the ALCM test program. Left there at the end of 81 and joined the reserves working A-10's. Didn't like them, didn't have a TA to align. Went to work for a private company in 84-91. I am currently back at Barksdale working with the first B-52 unit. I was deployed on Sept. 2001 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. We still know how to put "Bombs on Target". I hope to retire in 2010 with almost 30 years on the best aircraft in the Air Force. Hope to hear from all you Bomb Nav'ers, still can't get used to Com/Nav Mission Systems. J.D.
J.D. Ransom <jd4b52@earthlink.net>
Haughton, La USA -
this is the truth in the 301st. a&e we operated out of a wooden shack next to one of the smaller hangers on the north end of the ramp. in those days communication with job control was thru a dispatch section. it was manned on a rotation basis so everyone got the shaft so to speak. but when it was time to speak to job control it was with a battery operated field telephone. you had to crank it to make it ring. when it would go out we would cann parts from the pay phones located outside the fence. those were the days. regards alfie
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
We used a lot of rubber bands!
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, pa USA -
Bob...Was the BN system you and Alf worked on the "wind up" version or did the SAC bases already have electricity?
eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
Impudent one, USA -
c'mon bob you can be humble.................... my class number was 07-03-6 (mar 7, 1956) your still in first place. regards alfie
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
RE:Who started in B/N first? I started school in October, 1950, and my first assignment was to Rapid City in June, 1951. I guess that just makes me older, not better.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, pa USA -
MADREC, how could I forget this wonderful piece of equipment! As a brand new 3-level in December 1969 at Loring AFB, I was given the 'newbie' job of retrieving a madrec unit a bird that had landed in the wee hours of the morning after 2nd shift had called it a day (no 3rd shift). So here it is, 1st job of the day at 0700 hrs. Well it's tough to pick up the bolts with atric mittens on, so they were removed to do so. Unfortunately I didn't put them back on before picking up the madrec unit to carry it to the maintenace truck. Damn that thing is cold! The next morning, the tips of all of my fingers were black! Luckily the frostbite was only skin deep and caused only minor damage but it was the first AND last time I made that mistake. Oh, by the way, MADREC = MAlfunction Detection RECorder to the best of my memory.
Bruce Dearth <bedearth@westsidefoodbank.org>
Phoenix, AZ USA -
Gene Kopp...where are you????trying to locate Eugene "Gene" Kopp, last seen leaving Grand Forks in 73, heading SOUTH for warmer climates. Contact Alfie, me or Hembree.
eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
And now, for all you really sharp "weenies" comes the supreme test. The guy with the best score gets to spend a weekend with Alfie, or tech rep of choice. Fully paid thru YOUR retirement check or IBM............ At what angle did the coordinate converter outer gimbal "raise up" to allow the inner gimbal to pass? What was the function of the "dither" motor? If the video was above the HRL, delta H=s? The reticle break in the xhairs of the periscope was how large? What type of crystals were used in the RT-324? What was the freq of the RT-400(APN89A) How many elevation points were on the "last resort"? What did the acronymn MADREC stand for? Who started in BN first..Alfie, Ron or Bob? Did Ron really fly with Wilbur? And for you really "OLD" folks like Terrell, Don and "Oink" Ryberg.. How were the weapons loaded into the 36?
Eirish <Eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
If anyone would have known what the BBs were for, it would be Bob Warren. Curious about the photos in the "People" image section. A lot of mid-seventies 320th BW folks there. I'm betting the source for most of those 320th photos is Paul Porter. How about it Paul - you out there?
Terry McKinney <tmac3931@hotmail.com>
Tobaccoville, NC USA -
congratulations goes to bob warren for getting the correct answer. we have some fine parting gifts for bob. funny how you remember things. i was looking at the pictures on the web site and saw the cups. i didn't find out about their use until i went 111. one of our singer kearfott reps was ex raytheon. it seems that during their endurance testing the ends of the antenna would shatter off at about 1000 hrs. of sector scanning. goes to show you how much r & d was done in the old days. as opposed to the converter multiplexer that kearfott made for the -111. ah well. keep the faith alfie it had a mtbf of around 10 minutes.
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Great Design and useful information. I will be back soon!
cheap flights airline tickets <johngeorge77@netscape.net>
USA, none USA -
In January of 1960, SSGT Jon G. Jones and I (A/2c)at the time, went tdy from Walker AFB,N.Mex to Raytheon"s Wayland Laboratories "to attendd factory instructions and repair and adjustments of Radar Equipment." In reality it was just a boondoggle 5that allowed us to stay in a neat bed and breakfast, get picked up each morning and chuaffered to the Labs, then toured around the plant like celebraties-of course wearing suits and ties. In any case,responding to the query about the purpose of the little round cups, or cans on the ends of the antenna reflector, we were told they served as inertia dampeners to prevent stress and cracking of the reflector during sector scan. Someone even related the story of the engineer who sat on the front steps of the Lab for days dropping BBs in a can dreaming up this fix. Seems they tried different BB material and finally settled on stainless steel because some of the other materials tried,turned to powder or welded themselves together during sector scan mode. I love this site and appreciate hearing the war stories and seeing all the names of people I was stationed with or had at least heard about through my AF career. 6/17/03 Bob Warren
Bob Warren <mocuswa@aol.com>
Selah, Wa USA -
Was tipped off to this site by a fellow bombnaver. It was a real walk down memory lane. Good to see the names of so many old friends.
Fred Watkins <fred_watkins@prodigy.net>
Fort Worth, TX USA -
I forgot to thank the web masters for putting this site together; I wonder if you realize how many souls you may touch by providing this forum. June 16, 2003
Bruce Dearth <bedearth@westsidefoodbank.org>
Phoenix, AZ USA -
It's been thirty years since I left Bomb/Nav, what a flood of memories this web site brings back. I've already found a slew of names & email addresses of troops that I worked with. For me the scenario goes like this: Lowrey AFB, Jan-Sep 1969. Loring AFB, Sep 1969-Dec 1971. Carswell AFB, Jan-Feb 1972. Utapao RTNAF Thailand, Feb 1972-Feb 1973. I would be interested in communicating with those who served at Utapao during the LineBacker II campaign in Dec 1972. I apologize to those whose names I have forgot but the memories of that campaign are still with me. Mike Brubaker, if you read this, send me a message.
Bruce Dearth <bedearth@westsidefoodbank.org>
Phoenix, AZ USA -
OLD SAC STORY. In the middle sixties when the Alaska earthquake occured, SAC Hdqtrs. veiwed this as an opportunity to demonstrate their recon ability. They immediately dispatched an A/C from Offutt to take photographs of it.They made arrangements to quckly fly them down to show and impress LBJ at his ranch in Texas. When the Recon A/C returned, the pictures were quickly developed and it was decided that the crew that took the pictures would be best able to explain them to LBJ and answer any questions. The now weary crew arrived at the LBJ ranch just after nightfall.Approaching in the darkness, a couple of the crew managed to step in some cow dung.LBJ was expected shortly and Ladybiird Johnson graciously served them a drink or two, while they waited. When the President arrived and inquired what they were there for, apparently the fatique and the drink effected their speech as they attempted to explain. The President was not amused. He picked up the phone, dialed SAC Hdqtrs. and yelled, "what in the Hell is going on here? Get these drunken bums out of here". This story was told to me by a junior officer assigned there at the time.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
OLD SAC STORY. In the middle sixties when the Alaska earthquake occured, SAC Hdqtrs. veiwed this as an opportunity to demonstrate their recon ability. They immediately dispatched an A/C from Offutt to take photographs of it.They made arrangements to quckly fly them down to show and impress LBJ at his ranch in Texas. When the Recon A/C returned, the pictures were quickly developed and it was decided that the crew that took the pictures would be best able to explain them to LBJ and answer any questions. The now weary crew arrived at the LBJ ranch just after nightfall.Approaching in the darkness, a couple of the crew managed to step in some cow dung.LBJ was expected shortly and Ladybiird Johnson graciously served them a drink or two, while they waited. When the President arrived and inquired what they were there for, apparently the fatique and the drink effected their speech as they attempted to explain. The President was not amused. He picked up the phone, dialed SAC Hdqtrs. and yelled, "what in the Hell is going on here? Get these drunken bums out of here". This story was told to me by a junior officer assigned there at the time.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
do any of you oldsters remember why the q-38/48 antenna had those little cups with the bb's in them? ibm story which i've told to zellner i believe. ibm had a facility in huntsville alabama. while they were developing the aou, some of our people would periodically trip down there and they would come to omaha with the same frequency. during one of my trips we were traveling by t-39 and had to stop and pick up one of the xo guys at the redstone army post, which was the gov't trans pick-up point for huntsville. upon landing we noticed a large group of people who had come out to see the "jet" land. the guy driving the re-fueling truck had a stub of a lit cigar in his mouth and looked like he hadn't performed any personal hygene in some time. fueling the a/c was always dicey as you had to have two people hold the wing vent valves open to prevent air locks in the fuel system. some one had to monitor the c/l and make sure the fuel fed evenly to maintain cg. when all this was over our attendant puffed his cigar, thanked us and wished us a good day. all the on lookers waved and after a sweaty battery start (all battery starts were sweaty) we taxied out to runway plumb 40 and took off. ibm subsequently closed the huntsville facility and moved back to oswego. thank you jesus!!!!!!!!!! keep the faith al hall
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
For the benefit of any Carswell B-36 B/Ners and any Q-38ers, who might remember Frank Janecek and Andy Komanoski, I thought I'd close out the book on them. Both graduated from Endicott NY High School at the same time (playing on the same baseeball team), joined the AF together, went to B/N school together and were assigned to Carswell AFB together and spent their entire enlistment there.After discharge, both were hired by IBM for development work on the MA-2 (ASB-4) prototype. Both were assigned to Lake Charles AFB for flight test work.Aparently they played as hard as they worked as they were told by IBM mangement that they would never, ever be assigned to the same location again. Frank returned to Carswell as the lead IBM Rep and Andy was assigned to Walker where I came to know him well. Andy progressed to mamager of roughly the 2nd AF area and then served as IBM Rep at 15th AF Hdqtrs.He died there of an inoperable brain tumor. Frank moved to Lead IBM Rep at Loring where I replaced him about 1961. Frank and I worked together again out here in CA on a Satellite Surveilance program and both of us retired in ths late 1980s. We shared many chuckles over the old B/N days.Frank passed away a couple of years ago.Both Andy and Frank brought a no-nonsense, experienced background to the Q-38 program that was invaluable.
Ron Larson <antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, Ca USA -
About 1965 at Ramey AFB, I met a couple of enterprising B/N Sgts.(Sgt Bobbie Dycus ?). Their hobby was coin collecting and Puerto Rico was the mother lode of old coins. All their off duty time was spent visiting banks all over the island. They would get rolls of coins, sort through them and then swap them in for different rolls. They'd stop at all the little rum shacks and inquire about old coins. They were wildly successful and would catch hops back to the mainland to sell them.Probably retired on the French Riviera now.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park , CA USA -
Early at Walker, John Barinato said To mw (neophyta tech rep)"Come on Ron, we're going to a ameeting".As we went into the conference room, Col. Best ? the Wing Commander and his entire staff was present. Col. Best opened the meeting by saying, "As this meeting was at your request Mr Barinato, would you care to make some opening remarks ?" John said, "yes I would" and then said " as far as I'm concerned, the handling of supply on this base borders on criminal negligiance".The room went very quiet (especially me). Then Col Best asked if he had some evidence of this. John lifted up his briefcase and said "yes I do". We were really being impacted by unit shortages - particularly radar. At that time the AF had just implemented a computer controlled supply system. At the base besides the Q-38 B-52 Wing, we had a K system B-47 Wing (509th) plus remnents of the B-36s being replaced. Supply was really screwed up.As IBM Owego was the only repair depot and supplier of units, we received a DD 250 on all units shipped to Walker and knew what they had there.We embarrassed Supply so many times by locating units they claimed they didn't have that they banned us from entrance anymore.The problem was given to one of Col Best staff to take care of.
Ron Larson <antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
RE:Tech Rep Follies: Anyone who knew Bob Duffy would wonder what he wanted with a tape of the Bible in the first place.
Robert Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
All I said in my weekly report was, "Darrell Nye left for Puerto Rico this week by way of a blonde in Chicago, a brunette in Detroit and whatever he can find in New York City." And it was true. He had been writing both the girl in Chicago and the one in Detroit and had made arrangements to stop and see them on the way through. I made up the part about NYC. And yes, I did get my hand slapped, but it didn't hurt very much. When I was at Seymour Johnson I went out to meet a B-52 for debriefing around midnight on a night when it was raining cats and dogs. I drove out on the flight line and parked near the edge of the ramp to wait when I heard a voice yell, "get out of the car and stand between the headlights with both hands on the hood!" It was an AP on plane guard who was evidently pissed off at having to stand out in the rain while I was warm and dry in my car. He made me put my pass on the ground in front of the car and then lie spread eagled on the ground while he checked it. He made me lie there until I was good and wet and then let me go. I decided I didn't really need to go to the debriefing and went home and took a shower.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
TECH REP FOLLIES: John Barinato, the first Lead IBM tech rep at Walker AFB, told me that he never worried about security violations.While flight testind a prototype ASB-4 System (MA-2) on a B-47 out of Lake Charles AFB, they lost the canopy and an entire set of classified tech orders that he was signed for, were dispersed over the swamps of southern Louisianna. He fiqured they already had enough on him to put him away for life. Andy Kominoski (ex AF B-36 at Carswell) also at Walker had his badge fall off as he flushed the toilet and watched it disappear. Wing policy required the you write a statement explaining how you lost your badge and why it wouldn't happen again. In true western fashion, Andy told them that that he wasn't going to write no g-- d--- report. Consider the fate of Jim Northrup (later the UTE expert) ex Coast Guard and coffee addict, who took off on an early morning mission with no breakfast. As soon as airborne , he asked where the coffee was and was informed that since none of the crew drank coffee, none was aboard. Probably the longest 12 hours of Jim's life. At Wright Pat, Wes Lay, an IBM tech rep and a legend in his own mind, had match books printed up proclaiming his name, title with gold wings against an IBM blue background. The first time his manager, Andy Kominoski saw one, he about vomited. Then at Walker AFB we have the case of Bernie Schriebner with an outstanding background in IBM commercial computers. Bernie was a true soft spoken Kentucky gentleman who was incapable of telling a lie. Obviously not the tech rep type and so returned to the plant. At Loring one dark night, Roger Perrin (kicked out of Navy fight training because he was secretly married) got his head torn open by a lowered ciircuit breaker panel as he crawled up into an airplane.The base hospital patched him up for a nominal fee.When I found out all the paperwork required to be filled out by IBM, I made a deal with Roger that I would pay half the cost and we'd forget the whole thing. Could there be any truth to some rumors that Bob Zellner got his wrist slapped by IBM management for including comments on sexual exploints of fellow tech reps in his weekly reports? Nah, couldn't be true. Al Loring Pete Sudyk, GPL doppler expert (also WW2 submariner) had taped recordings of the Bible, which he loaned to IBMer Bob Duffy. Bob transferred to Beale AFB and didn't return the tapes, which really pissed off Pete. (I know this story stretches credulity, but it's true).A couple of months later, Bob called Pete for help on doppler problems. As soon as Pete recognized Bob's voice, he shouted out F--- You Bob Duffy and slammed down the phone. One dark night, as I drove done the parking ramp at Walker, to help on a pre flight, as we were requred to do at the time, I was pulled over by a Security Truck. After verifying my ID and flightline car pass and and correctly reciting the password of the day, he asked me "Why are you in civilian clothes?" I replied, "Because I'm a civilian." That apparently satisfied him.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Nebury Park, CA USA -
During the early 80's the 92nd Bomb Wing was deployed out to the old airstrip at Moses Lake, WA, while the Fairchild runway was being resurfaced. We stayed in the old moth balled base housing, that was still on site since the base was closed. There was still about 4 inches of Mt. St. Helens ash still on the ground with a patchwork of emerging grass. When I arrived there was a note on the makeshift table,(2 garbage cans with a piece of plywood), that was set up in the kitchen area . It still remains one of the most accurate quotes I have ever read. It described the accomodations. It read ""ADJECTIVES ELUDE THE STATE OF THIS STRUCTURE."
Chip Billingsly <PowerDawg242@wmconnect.com>
FAFB, WA USA -
I have seen several articles in the guestbook relating to "Chrome Dome" and reminded me of the first scheduled mission. This was in October 1958 @ Loring and the A/C were loaded with nukes. There were generals & colonels everywhere, engines were running and crews were awaiting taxi instructions. Suddenly all engines were shut down and the crews left the aircraft and launch was cancelled. Nobody had obtained permission from Canada to fly over their airspace with nuclear weapons. The weapons were downloaded and the following day the flights were cleared for go without weapons. The aircrews were to be evaluated on ability to withstand 24+ hours flight time. The next day the relief aircraft was launched and debriefing was preceeded by healthy shots of "Old Methusaleh". The fatigue and the "shots" made for some interesting write-ups. The next day the debriefing preceeded the "shots". I dont know when "Chrome Dome" flights with real "guns" started as I left in March '59 for Spain. I don't know how many of the old Loring troop remember this, but C. Hinson & T. Hickox were that at the time. Also, on that day, a U-2 landed & was immediately put into nose dock and wall to wall security was placed around the dock. The U-2 took aff the next day just before sunset. Nobody knew what it was. In 1961, the world knew about U-2's.
Bill Woodard <twobws@verizon.net>
Sun City, CA USA -
Back in 1959 I was the IBM Tech Rep at Seymour Johnson AFB, NC where the B-52s were equipped with the Q-38 system. One of the weak points on the Raytheon radar (I can't remember the number designator) was the antenna tilt motors. They failed with some regularity with the result that the antenna would point straight down and be useless. One day a joint Boeing/AF investigating team showed up on the base, shut down all activity and started interviewing just about everybody involved in operations or maintenance trying to get some ideas for fixes for many of the aircraft and/or system problems. A Major was interviewing the BN troops in the shop and asked if we had had any problems with the tilt motors, and if so, what were we doing about it? TSgt "Hank" Snow told him that we had it licked, we just put a big rubber band on the antenna and when the motors failed, the rubber band would hold the antenna in position so it was still usable. About three weeks later, I got a nasty letter from IBM telling me the rubber band fix was definitely not reccommended, and why hadn't I let them know what we were doing down there in North Carolina. When I told the guys in the shop, they couldn't believe that anyone had taken Snow seriously. We got a big laugh out of it, but the higher ups at IBM, Boeing and the AF didn't think it was at all funny.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Mid Shift entries to the log. (Lack of sleep, circadean rhythm out of wack, or true genius/madness, seemed to play a part in many entries left for the oncoming shift. Here is an excerpt from one such night. "Life and Times of Emily Bimbab" """In a quiet town not far from where you and I live, there was a dame who gave birth to a little dame and named her Emily Bimbab. Emily's life was not unlike your life or my life, because Emily's life cosisted of the things that your life and my life consisted of, around the times that these things happened in your life and my life. Turbulent times, turbulent yet changing times. A time when you didn't have time to worry about the changingtimes in your life and my life and in Emily's life. A time when people couldn't tell time, so time had no meaning, meaning Emily had no time for life. So Emily grew, grew and grew and grew some more. Her growing was not unlike your growing or my growing. She grew from within, she grew from without, she grew from without and within without time. Imagine your life and my life without time. No time for the timeless meaning of time in a time where time had no meaning. I don't care how many times I hear this timeless tale I can't imagine a life without time, without meaning, without the timeless meaning your life and my life without time, without meaning, without the timeless meaning your life and my life consisted of in a town only a short time away from where you and I live. Emily Bimbab is presently destitute and living in an abandoned trailer park just this side of Omaha. She's lost her last eleven jobs due to consistent tardiness. It seems Emily can't keep track of time. """"
Chip Billingsly <PowerDawg242@wmconnect.com>
FAFB, WA USA -
HEY B/N HERO'S LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU GUYS. GIVE A YELL WHEN YOU GET A CHANCE.
Jim Blevin <mblevin@arkansas.net>
USA -
Anyone who has ever replaced an RT Unit on the APS-64 system on B-47's can appreciate this. While I was at Moron AB, Spain, I had to replace the RT Unit on an alert aircraft. I was holding the RT Unit up & in place with my head and left hand and trying to start the mounting screws with my right hand. A maintenance officer was tugging at my pant leg without saying anything. My concentration was on my task and not his presence. A 2nd tug was felt which I ignored. With the third tug, I kicked in the direction I thought the individual was. I stated that the next time I would toss him the RT unit and he could hold it . When I had completed the installation, the CC told me I had just missed the guy and he left immediately. I never heard about the incident, but told the AMS officer of the incident upon arrival back at AMS.
Bill Woodard <twobws@verizon.net>
Sun City, CA USA -
How I emember the 300VDC and the PSM6 (I hated the PSM6!). On one of those long past 12 hour shifts, I had the PSM6 leads connected to a 300VDC supply, and I reached down and grabbed both of the PSM6 brass lead connectore to tighten them. It really woke me up!. Bill Wynn, Turner AFB, GA. 1963-1966. wlwynn@attbi.com
Bill Wynn <wlwynn@attbi.com>
Orange Park, FL USA -
It's no fun to be "chinned" by the theta motor on a B-36 either. There was a display panel directly over the stab unit so you hit your head when you jerked and bounced right back down on the motor. I've seen a guy bounce three or four times before he got out.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
In the mid 50's at Loring, a dedicated B/N troop was troubleshooting a problem and had his big green manual schematic sheets unfolded on several schematics. With a PSM-6 he was checking +300VDC in the CAU and found the +300VDC terminal, attached the meter lead to the terminal and was diligently searching the schematic for the - terminal. Totally engrossed in his troubleshhoting, he inadvertently touched the negative meter lead to his lip. Those who have "chinned" the theta motor on the B-52D stab unit can appreciate the total impact. The poor guy was still "spitting' 2 hours later.
Bill Woodard <twobws@mchsi.com>
Sun City, CA USA -
Sgt Howard Kitchens was in charge of swing shift. Howard was a hell of a man and he thought of all of the airmen as his own kids. And I was the problem child. I used to take a shower before going to bed so that I could jump up and bruch my teeth and shave quickly in the evening before going to work. That used to bug Howard and he could always tell that I hadn't washed my face. I just couldn't understand how he could tell, but he could. From clear across the room he'd say, "Kunich, go wash your face." I thought and thought and thought about it but I couldn't come up with the method he was using to do it. so I tried the scientific approach. Figuring I'd test the limits of his perception I'd wash half of my face and only hold that half towards him. "Kunich, go wash your face." Then I tried just splashing water on my whole face and leaving it wet so I glistened. "Kunich, go wash your face." Then I tried washing just my nose and combing my hair (yes I actually had some at one time) over most of my face. "Kunich, go wash your face." Finally I gave up and would wash my face with a scrub brush before I came into work and damned if he didn't stop it. Personally I think that he was psychic. But I sure do miss him and hope that where ever he is, he's telling some kid, "Hey, go wash your face." Cause whenever I'm about to put one over on someone I remember "Kunich, go wash your face" and I try to be as good as Sgt Howard Kitchens was.
Tom Kunich <cyclintom@yahoo.com>
San Leandro, CA USA -
ED Jones comment about no CNDs,reminded me of the time changes we had to do on some units.Some crew chiefs wouldn't let you mess with the system,if it was good,solution was swap the nomenclature plates,.worked great and no one knew the difference,except cc and 2 BN troops.
L.J. McGaha <ljmcgaha@hotmail.com>
Bossier City, La USA -
I just uploaded a picture of my Q-24 BN class to the images section. We graduated on May 15, 1951 at Keesler AFB, Miss. The guys in the picture are: Fred Wynant, Lou DiNunzio, Vern Johnson, Don Ogden, George Tims, Paul Waters, Henry Paul, Bob Norelli, Hal Eaton, Bob Ritchey, ? Halloway, Chet Benfinger, Jack Welch and Bob Zellner. I can't believe how thin we all were back then.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
I was with the 11th BW at Altus AFB, OK when they won the Fairchild Trophy in, I think, 1961. It was the first time a Q-38 equipped wing won the competition and there was much partying going on when the troops got back. Don Shoemaker was spot promoted to MSgt. and had a party at his house, but kept getting calls from the local police to come down and get some of his BN boys out of jail, so the party sort of fizzled. General Three Finger Black Jack Ryan gave the welcoming home speech at the flight line ceremony and what he basically said was, "OK, you did something good, now get off you asses and do something better!"
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Bill Woodard, thanks for remembering me as young. SJ produced many memories. I have a phot of Spider and me out here somewhere. I have more private stories of the goings on at SJ than I do public ones. Most should probably be kept private after all these years. I still have the ring from BombComp. Still looks new. That was the first year the FB-111's beat us out. I got my revenge in 80 when we took the Fairchild back with the standard Q-38 system with AOU only. It felt good...really good. Sent one of my better troops to the party to see what it was almost like in the good old days. Now Bomb Coomp in BAFB is another source of interesting stories. Bomb/Nav'rs never die...they just go to that big TA alignment in the sky..........
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
Clayton, NC USA -
RE: Compass Swings, Eirish, Wilbur & Orville's flight was VFR,any heading O.K.. Our 781 was signed by C Lindbergh, Paris, France as "compass readings were excellent".
Bill Woodard <twobws@mchsi.com>
Sun City, CA USA -
Gosh, you compass swinging guys must really be OLD. Doubt if I ever used the rose more than 10-15 times..... As for us young troops, we switched to the MC-1 in 62...north line only and then when I got to the BUFFS, we swung to locked star on the astro-pecker. Could I assume that when you used the "rose" Orville or Wilbur signed the 781 or was Larson qualified by then?....................................Keep the stories coming..... Love to read them.............. AS for the CNDs in the 781, just because there's ten squawks, 4 bad bombs and TA inop(tilt) doesn't mean there isn't something wrong. Ops check sat iaw TO 1B52G-2-26 was good enough for me. Ever notice the disparity in squawks between R-E and S crews???? It's O.K., my wife didn't know shit about BN either..........Keep the Faith
Eirish <eirish1@attbi,com>
USA -
Re: compass swings, after leaving the B-47's and the 9th BW at Mtn Home, Idaho hired in at Boeing Wichita running preflights and working flight squaks on the B-52 "G" ASB-9 Bomb/Nav, Doppler, Astro Tracker celestial Nav system, got to stand on the brakes each time the tractor stopped on the compass swing one night on 2nd shift. Was the only othr time I went round in circles besides the time I struggled with the astro tracker preflight untill the senior test engineer came out to the A/C and suggested that I take the cover off the dome. Otherwise, all you 9th Bomb Wing vets the reunion will be on Sept 11-14 in Coeur d'Alane Idaho. Reunion Coordinator is Bibiana Nertney, 7726 W. Mooserun Ct.,Boise Idaho 83704. (208)322-5145. Ran Gemmell, Ron Turner, my MSN address is Kaput along with your e mail address, so hope you see this. In addition, the all-SAC reunion at the old Castle AFB will be Oct 7-12. HDQ is Doubletree Modesto with bus service provided to the base for tours of the B-47, B-52, B-36, B-58 opened up to us. Info for "Gathering of Eagles" at B-47.com, B-52 Stratoforteress Association.com, or at Jocobsensb-36hanger.bigstep.com; hope to see you there!
Tony Ascanio <tobaras@juno.com>
Bothell, Wa USA -
Robert Zellner, Re: Compass swings. The compass rose you spoke of was still in use until the new Rose was built on the opposite end of the runway. I had the privilege of being involved in a few swings on the old one, but the new one was back in the woods. Blueberry bushes and small trout streams were easily available from the rose. Did anyone else from Bomb Nav ever go out on a compass swing with their fishing rod? The old Rose was rendered useless when they built the big hangar in close proximity to that end of the runway. A jet engine test stand was built just off the 270 deg side of the new rose and caused some interference but coped with it. The jet engine guys didn't fish either. Those were good old days.
Bill Woodard <twobws@mchsi.com>
Sun City, CA USA -
Bill Woodward, Re:compass swinging at Limestone. I was sent to Limestone in Feb. of 1953 and was discharged Aug. 14, 1954, just a short time before you arrived. In the early spring of 1953 we realized that all the aircraft would need a compass swing soon, and we were faced with the choice of sending them back to Carswell where they had a real compass rose with a turntable and everything, or figuring out how to do it ourselves. A bright young officer with an engineering degree figured out where true north was and laid out a compass rose on the ramp and had them paint lines every 15 degrees. We made a couple of wooden plugs to fit in the hubs between the wheel on the main landing gear and hung plumb bobs from them. We then pulled the aircraft around the rose, stopping every fifteen degrees and measuring the distance from the plumb bobs to the lines. The officer had worked out a formula to determine the exact heading of the aircraft by adding or subtracting the measurements. Then we would adjust the flux valves for the K-system and the N-1 compass and make all the adjustments on the back of the N-1 indicator. It sounds kind of crude, but it worked pretty good. I had the dubious honor of heading up the crew that made the first compass swing at Limestone AFB. Speaking of the N-1, I knew a guy who was a tech rep for Kollsman on the N-1 of all 8th AF. He traveled to each of the bases for a couple of weeks at a time and taught classes to the BN troops. He was single at the time, and I thought he had the cushiest job in the AF. His name was Al Custode in case any of you remember him.
Robert Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Don't ever think that being on flying status as a B/N wouldn't work on you. About six months after my wife and I married, I was going to PMEL school in Denver. One night I had a dream, "in color!" I dreamed I was flying a 10 hour training mission. All was well until, the yellow eject light came on. I raced down to the Nav. positions and the Port relay rack was smoking. All the circuit breakers were already popped. I was rushing cooling down cannon plug connectors and cutting safety wires and disconnecting units when the eject light went red and both Navigators ejected. I could feel the aircraft shudder as other crewmembers ejected and I could hear the flaps, landing gear and everything else deploying. I grabbed my chute and fumbled into it and dove through the hole where the R/Nav had ejected. I waited until I could see the whole B52 above me, before I pulled the rip cord. Going down, I could see a farmer plowing a field far below me, the soil turning dark behind the tractor. I tried to avoid the fresh turned soil but couldn't. I hit , one leg buried up and I heard and felt it snap. I dumped the chute and harness and was trying to straighten my leg out when the farmer drove up on the tractor and asked me what had happened? I replied that, "Sir I have just jumped from a B52, I am injured and someone needs to notify air rescue." He then took the steering wheel off and started beating me over the head with it! --REMEMBER THIS IS A NIGHTMARE-- Waht really had happened, according to my new wife, was I started thrashing and hollering in my sleep. She shook me to waken me. I immediately grabbed my pillow, stood up in the bed, walked to the foot, jumped almost to the ceiling, and landed on my butt on a concrete floor with just a thin rug on it. She jumped to the end of the bed, asked me what had happened and I said, "Sir I have just jumped from a B52, I am injured and someone needs to notify air rescue." She took her pillow and started hitting me over the head with it and woke me up. I had sweated out the bed, my pajamas and my hair was dripping in my face. I had to go take a shower while she remaid the bed. The next morning, she said "Boy! I thought you had gone whacky there for awhile, I am sure glad your off flying status!"
Jack Jeffers <airdawg@pchnet.com>
Huntingdon, TN USA -
Completed BNS K-Series school & reported to Limestone AFB on 8/20/54. Feb 1955 worked with US Coast & Geodetic surveyor to layout the new Compass Rose. Snow up to the waist & could only tap stakes into snow. Surveyor came back in summer to finalize the survey. After that, I volunteered for the field shop in Computers. Went to Radar & I.C.E.school @ Lowry in July '56 and back to Loring in Jan 57. Stayed in field shop in Radar until Sep 57 and back to flight line. Worked with C.Hinson,G.Spilman, T.Hickox, and many other fine BN types. Left Loring in Mar 59 amd went to Moron AB, Spain in support of B-47 Reflex operations. 3 BN types to maintain 24/7 support on base and housing was 34 miles away in Seville. B47 alert force doubled in'61 and had TDY's from Lincoln AFB & Hunter AFB. Finally in Tall Cotton! Mar 62 went to Hunter AFB GA to wait for phase out of B-47 and in 1963 went to Carswell AFB for B-58's. Worked in field shop Inertial Section & left in Jun 64 for Little Rock AFB, AR. Worked with Base surveyor to establish True North reference (+/-3mins)for test table. Only reference point was end of runway. 5 hours later we were in AMS hallway for the final shot which took about 15 minutes. No more surveying for me!! Stayed @ LRAFB until Jun 68 and was sent to Grissom AFB & stayed there until B-58 phaseout in Mar 70. Had to remain @ Grissom until all test sets were shipped out and did not get to Westover until May 70 & missed out on ARC-Lite to Guam. Finished FTD school & went to job control as expediter until U-Tapao in May 72 and then to Seymour Johnson AFB in May 73. After my arrival, it seems as though everyone retired & I assumed duties as BN supervisor. There were no finer BN personnel than the ones I worked with in the 68TH AMS. Jim Skinner, Spider Lassiter, Tony Messier, Bob Howery, Bernie Becker & numerous young troops that were all shining examples. Jim Skinner & Tony Messier "waxed" everything that showed up @ BOMB COMP '74 and only lost out because of target identification by RN on the first RBS.(99,999ft). The 68th also had the best operational record in SAC for 1974. Not bad for first year out of SE ASIA and also FLIR/CCTV modification. I retired in July 75 with the RIF after Vietnam. Had I not been on a TAC base, I would have had to wait until ???? as Bomb Nav was @ critical manning levels because of retirement rather than GUAM for 6 months every 6 months. I spent 24 years in Billings, MT in Sales & Service. I had customers in Minot ND & Rapid City SD & that was the closest I came to Bomber types. Retired to Southern California in Oct '99 and loving it. I have difficulty remembering if there were any "bad times" as the "good times" were so numerous they overshadow all others. This is an excellent site and is an example of the camaraderie that has prevailed within Bomb Nav since Bomb Nav began. Jon, thanks to you and Cindy for your dedication and hard work to maintain this site. I'll be in touch again. I accept E-Mails from all.
Bill Woodard <twobws@mchsi.com>
Sun City, CA USA -
Jon, and Cindy...Thank You. This place allows us all to be young again. The memories live on, as do the contributions to peace we all made. GW...You had better contact me you little shit. I miss you man. Jim
Jim Pachall Sr <debra.pachall2@verizon.net>
California City, CA USA -
My new address is trike700@sport.rr.com Write to me if you want to b.s. about old times
Gerald W. Harris <trike700@sport.rr.com>
shreveport , la. USA -
ORI memories fromthe early "60s. Gooney bird declares in-flight problems and requests emergency landing instructions. Out steps Gen. Selmon Wells and the SAC IG team. All in-flight a/c were ordered back. Target coordinates were given in latitude and longitude so target prediction people had to select offset aimpoints from topographical maps (no radar pictures). Most experienced crews ( who could probably improve the aiming information and pass it to the following crews) flew last. Alert a/c flew with no maintenance allowed on them. The mission was timed so that in-flight refueling was done, in radio silence, heading west into the setting sun. The bomb runs were done after many hours of flight allowing ample time for radar or other problems to develop. There wasn't much that you could do to beat the system. If you had placed some troublesome a/c over on alert to get them off your back for awhile, you really sweated it out.
Ron Larson <antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
i was told i could not use CND to sign off acft records, i had to change some thing and break a perftly good acft, i said no and ended up in job control, it does not rain or snow in job.
ed jones <amxjones@earthlink.net>
warrensburg, mo USA -
Did you ever complete a 349 with the comment "Short Between the Headset"?
Jack Jeffers <airdawg@pchnet.com>
Huntingdon, TN USA -
Some chrome-Dome stories. Did ja watch the Wings history Channel episode where the chrome-Dome (CD) routes were shown. Lot of flying back in them days. Seems to me that we (Glasgow AFB; 4141 strat wing then 91st Bomb wing) flew CD missions all the time I was stationed there. We had a break of about two weeks, but the wing that replaced us failed an ORI or a Bar None so we went back on CD. We didn't have many problems we couldn't fix on the ground. We did have some querky RNs though. Little Joe "B" always carried as small tool kit. Most of his write-ups were usually the result of his "tweaking" the system. His most common one was "the crosshairs are jitterey". This was on the old MA6A/7A system that had that humongus bomb sight. I think it had 4X magnification. Real usefull at 50,000 feet on a cloudy nite. Anyway, the RNs used the optics to make sure the wheels were up. During launch, when Little Joe "B" was on the crew we would get a call, the cross hairs are jittery. Old John Clovis taught me a trick. We would open the SAU or CAU rack and one guy would pretend that he was ajusting the sensitivity pot while the other guy would play with the tracking handle. Worked for us. Then old Stormy "W" an old WWII 8th AF B-17 RN would send out a call that the radar was blooming, usually too much gain. This guy couldn't adjust the scope, I think he was going blind. We would climb on board, one time through the wheel well as the AC was just starting to roll, one guy at the SN135 or the SN158 would pretend to do something while the other adjusted the scope. As for parachutes, our AC all-ways carried at least 4 extra chutes on the cot in the upper deck. they made nice pillows when we worked all nite on a problem. And jumping out thru the nav egress. I always wondered about that. Here we are at 50,000 feet flying at about 600 knots, outside temperature is minus 60 below and all we are wearing is those thin insulated flight coveralls. Now if we have to go out, the wind chill must be about minus 100 below, do we have a snow balls chance in hell of surviving? And someone once told me, probabley John Clovis, the protocall for abandonding the AC was to lower the landing gear to slow the AC. take care trinidad
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander , Wyoming USA -
for Jim Pachall met John Cormier while having an inertial nav system installed in a "g" at barksdale in '76. he was ncoic of b/n 10 years later i ran into him in lake charles la when i went to work for boeing doing the kc-135 pdm. he was a govt. inspector working for what was known as dcas. john was a shining light in a sea of idiocy. they had inspectors who were formerly inspecting clothing, power systems in the tva, etc. nothing aircraft related. their leader was a social promotion. one of the lady inspectors ran away with a production guy. needless to say it was really an event to remember in dealing with them. i left about a year before they shut down the program and went back to the oilfield which had rejuvinated by then. as bill eirish can tell you i will look around my data base of phone numbers for john in the next few weeks. will let you know keep the faith alfie
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Guess I’ll post another 32191 story. I was head of the TA alignment team, and as several others have mentioned, our first one took several days. But we learned some tricks as we went along as others have mentioned, specially having a TA computer and R/T unit married in the shop before beginning the alignment and finally got it down to around 4 hours. As I mentioned before, we had a 32191 Super-Chief as NCOIC. I was working on B52Es with the AN/ASB4-4A-MA16 B/N system. And, we were having trouble, if we made 4 or five missions before the TA system shot craps, we thought we were doing good! We were even doing TA alignments before any bird went to the Hurry Area for ground alert. Finally one day, SMS Fremlin called me on the carpet. He read me the riot act about us rushing through the alignments and not doing a good job. He said “I am tired of all these Broken Fail-Safes, if there is something wrong with the design of the unit, I want to know what it is. I also want a new one put on every aircraft before they go on alert! I have checked and there are none in the forward supply point! I want one on today! And, I want it checked out in the shop before it goes in the forward supply point, if you have to work all night to do it!! By next Monday, I want to have at least three, shop tested Fail-Safes in the forward supply point, and I want one carried on every pre-launch!” He wouldn’t let me get a word in edgewise, sidewise or up and down. When he finished, He told me “He was not interested in anything I had to say, to shut-up! and get to work!” Soooo! I built a bogus what-cha-ma-call-it out of electronic junk. Researched the model nos. and gave it a bogus model number and FSN. Named it a B52E TA Fail-Safe and took it to the forward supply point in the Avionics bldg. and told the supply clerk to be sure and tell Sgt Fremlin the Gremlin that it was there in the morning. The next morning, about an hour before breakfast, I was called and told to report to the A&E Commander’s office post-haste. When I got there, I could here Fremlin shouting inside the office. When he came out, he wouldn’t even speak to me he was so mad. The commander called me in and told me that Court-Martial charges were being prepared against me, to return to the barracks, and consider myself under “House Arrest”. About two hours later, I was told to report to the DCM’s office. When I got there, I had to wait about an hour before they told me to go in. Col. Furrie was as red as a beet. The ADCM told me to close the door and take a seat. When I sat down, Col Furrie just sat there looking at me. I looked at his desk, and there sat my “Fail-Safe”. I looked at the ADCM and he had his hand over his face, and tears were running out of his eyes. About then, Col. Furrie started pounding on the desk, and I jumped straight up in the air. Suddenly, they both started laughing so loud you must have been able to hears them all the way across base. Col Furrie got his handkerchief out and started wiping his face. When he regained control, he said “You know you’re not very popular in the B/N shop right now. By all means, you should receive a Court-Martial but I have convinced Sgt. Fremlin that this would make him look more of a fool that he already is and there is no way that Headquarters would fail to hear about it.” “For right now, you are being transferred to Job Control as the A&E expeditor. Go move your stuff to the Headquarters Squadron, and for God’s sake don’t pull anything like this over there. The Headquarters Squadron, First Sgt. Is Jake Melish, and he has no sense of humor at all! Now get out of here and try to keep your nose clean for awhile”
Jack Jeffers <airdawg01>
Huntingdon, TN USA -
Bomb Nav ALL the way. Touched my first Buff in 1968, last in 1986. Retired in 1991 after 4 years on the B-2. To some of the names I see here I know well: G.W Harris, Ray Turner, Tom Colen, Larry Anderson and there are more, but I'm in a hurry at the moment....I miss you all. To the rest of you that I don't know, or simply can't remember at the moment, a huge Bomb Nav hello to you too. I love the old Q-38, but my true claim to fame is the New OAS, and now that is being replaced by the Mid-Life Improvement Project. So, life goes on, and so does Peace of Sorts, Primarily due to this weapon system, and all of us who have kept her running all these years. To all of You...Thank You! Jim Pachall Sr. I definately wish to hear from any of you who care to e-mail. Anyone out there know where John Cormier, and Pappy Allgood got off to? And if they still walk this earth?
Jim Pachall <debra.pachall2@verizon.net>
California City, CA USA -
1973 buffs going home from guam (rash) got up in buff on 5 min line, no radar , no modulater, told rn would have park acft, rn said you tell pilot, got on headset to pilot, pilot said if i did not want yo go home early to "GET OFF HIS AIRPLANE", i thought aboutit.
ed jones <amxjones@earthlink.net>
warrensburg, mo USA -
In 1973 While TDY on "Bullet Shot" there was a poor eledtrician working in the wheel well, on a "Red Ball" on a "G" model, when the aircraft took off so they had to abort the combat mission and stay local, shooting approaches, which was something you didn't see often. I'll bet that was fun for the electrician.
Charlie White <cwhite@castles.com>
Fairfield, CA USA -
don't understand the lack of chutes. at bergstrom there was always a chute on the can downstairs and one upstairs somewhere in the area of the ip seat. they stayed with the aircraft. different strokes i guess. ..............keep the faith ..................alfie
alfie hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Nice site keep it up. But make una comot una hand hereooooo.
Mgbabda Nwangwa <mgbada@yahoo.com>
Lome, Aneho Togo -
This also happen at Larson AFB, Washington back in 1960 a a Bomb/Nav troop named Jim Harbin was working on a malfuction before take off and the crew taxi out to the runway and took off with poor old Jim Harbin... No chute no flight helmet and no lunch... The flight crew was one of the best they had with the 327th Bomb Sq. The crew didn't want a late take off or abort the mission charge againt them... So off they went with poor Jim..... Well you can guess what happened, there were some butts rip outs... After that on the launch truck there was an extra chute and flying helmet, so this would never happen again... Then the only ones who rode in the launch truck were the guys on flight status for that current month... This web site has brough my Bomb/Nav days back from the past. I loved my part on what I did in Bomb/Nav. Worked with some great guys in my four years in Bomb/NAv...... Worked on B52D models, my AFSC was 32150E. System was MA-6A, was also on flight status, Came out as an A1C (E4)... Don't know what that rank would be in today Air Force... I would like to give credit to JON VANOVER and CINDY JEFFERS for getting this web site on line...... I am now a old man, but this website makes me feel young again, thank you.. By the way when did the women come into the Bomb/Nav Field.. (this is only a question, by no means am I putting them down) D.R. Adams (DOC)
D.R. ADAMS (DOC) <ADAMS_B52D@HOTMAIL.COM>
ROSEVILLE , CA USA -
Great memories! I was Bomb/Nav from 1954 until retirement in 1975 @ Seymour Johnson. First duty station was Limestone(Loring) AFB, Maine. B-36, B52D, B47, B58 and back to B52D. I have seen a lot of familiar names and hope to get in touch with in the future.
Bill Woodard <twobws@mchsi.com>
Sun City, Ca USA -
Jack Jeffers,an important point you didn't mention was that you didn't have a chute. Your normal egress is to go headfirst through the hole after the Nav. ejects. I witnessed a somewhat similar situation at Loring where a tech was fixing a system and when t/o time came, they shoved a parachute up, closed the hatch and away they went.But at least it was only a normal mission,
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, ca USA -
Bill Eirish contacted me about the Chromedome memory, here is the rest of the story. The rest of the story was; When they popped the hatch, it was so cold when that hot OK air came flowing in, the aircraft fogged up. It must have been at least 105 deg. F. on the flight line. They told me I wasn't even supposed to have been on the flight, because I wasn't on the flight manifest, and for me not to go to debriefing. The debriefing truck picked the crew up and left me standing in front of the aircraft. I didn't get more than 3 or 4 hours sleep on that whole 24 hour mission, and I had been up about 8 hours when the plane took off. For me, It was the last straw. I grabbed my ditty bag of tools and the 2 bad mag/amps and started walking in to the shop. It was at least 3/4 of a mile cross-country from the aircraft. The further I walked, the madder I got! About half way there, a station wagon pulled alongside and honked. I just waved them off without even looking to see who it was. They pulled ahead, across my path, and rolled the window down. Lord have Mercy! It was the DCM! He was all by himself. He waved me over and told me to get in. I got in and apologized for not recognizing him at first. He handed me a little bottle and told me to have a drink. It was 20 year old cognac! He told me that nothing could be done officially to recognize my effort, but that it would not go un-noticed. That was Col. Frank Furrie. A big (6"4") red headed Irishman who was one of the best men I ever served under. Don Shumaker had shipped out and his replacement, a SMSgt Fremlin, was one of those new E-8 generic electronic maintenance managers (32191), who hadn't even been in Bomb/Nav before. I got off flying status, because he expected us to work our regular shifts and fly too. You'd catch a 4 1/2 hour training mission, with preflight and debriefing that added up to 6 1/2 to 7 1/2 hours. Then you had to go to the shop and work to the end of the shift at 4 P.M. If you had caught a 10 hour night training mission and got back about 6 AM, you had to work the rest of the day, 8 hours.
Jack Jeffers <airdawg@pchnet.com>
Huntingdon, TN USA -
Here is a quick story from the memoirs that I am writing. I was riding B/N launch for a Chrome-Dome preflight. It was August, SW Oklahoma, and hotter than the hinges of Hell. We even had an A/C ground air conditioning unit hooked to the hitch of the Launch Metro, blowing cool air into the backend. The A/C was just about to taxi, when they hollered “B/N, on the double!” I ran into the A/C, slapped the B/Nav. On the shoulder and asked what the problem was. He pointed at the 10” indicator. It had a bright spot and no sweep. I grabbed an interphone extension and hooked up my headset and crawled into the wine-cellar because I could smell something burning, and it was the mag/amp on the 10” indicator. It was so hot the black paint was turning gray and curling up. I told the A/C commander to call and have a mag/amp rushed to the A/C. Then I had the Nav. Shut the system down and had them run a small CO2 fire extinguisher up from the alert truck. I squirted the mag/amp to cool it down, and had started disconnecting it, when I got a call from the A/C Commander, that they were having trouble getting a mag/amp quick enough, but for me to hurry. I got the unit disconnected and about that time the A/C Commander called for me to hold on they were going to taxi. While they were taxiing the commander came on line again and wanted to know if there was anything I could do to prevent a late take-off. I told him I could remove the mag/amp from the 5” indicator and install it on the 10” because the 5” wasn’t mission-essential. He told me to proceed. Just as I got the unit off the 5”, some one threw a box into the wine-cellar. It was the mag/amp unit from supply. As I started hooking up the unit from the 5” onto the 10”, I felt the A/C began to taxi again, The B/Nav. came on the radio and told me to “Hang on, they were taking off.” When we got airborne, the A/C came on and told me to tell him as soon as I got the unit checked out. It only took another 4 or 5 minutes. I told the Nav. to power up, before I could crawl out of the wine-cellar, he reported to the A/C that we were “Go!” and we were! I spent over 24 hour’s sitting on the honey-bucket, in short sleeved fatigues, wearing somebody’s spare flight suit with newspaper stuffed around my torso and legs trying to keep my teeth from chattering. I ended up eating leftovers from the crew’s flight lunches. P. S. The spare unit was no good. John R. Jeffers
John R. Jeffers (Jeff) <airdawg@pchnet.com>
Huntingdon, TN USA -
I arrived at Lowry AFB in May, 1962, Signed into PATS. then into the 3443 School Sqdn and started Bomb/Nav school Our class graduated in Feb. 1962. Classmembers that I can remember; Joe Kaplako, Jon O. Cutchin, Robert L. Bell, Kenneth J. Rebar, and Richard Price. Jon, Joe and I were assigned to the 11th A&E, 11th BW, Altus AFB, OK. When I got there, MSGT D.S. Schumacker was the NCOIC, CMS C.B. Norton was the section chief. I worked for TSGT H.L. Scott. Other B/Nav'ers; SSgt Carl Lease, SSGT D.W. McCreadie, Airmen Eric Geis, K.P. Farris, H.S. Crow, J.D. KIrby, J.S. Farris, J.J. Holman, R.C. Boulware, J.A. Robinson, and others whose first name or initials I can't remember; Mason, Czya, Tri, Bateman, Wierzbici, Nadboralski, Wohoski, Pedersen. I was at Altus from Mar, 1963 to June 1967. I have many memories if working on the AN/ASB4-4A-MA16 B/N system, ACR and MADREC on the B-52E's at Altus. I'll post some war stories later. I would like any of the guys to contact me. John R. Jeffers airdawg@pchnet.com
John R. Jeffers (Jeff) <airdawg@pchnet.com>
Huntingdon, TN USA -
hey
amanda ridder <amanda_ridder2001@yahoo.com>
rockford, oh USA -
In 1963, on a temporary visit to Barksdale, I attended a wing maintenance meeting where they announced a major change in SAC maintainance philosophy. Generally no more maintenance preflights prior to the crew's and no inspections based on hours but only on write-ups.I recall this vividly as the CMS making the presentation called it the "no-leakee no-peakee" policy. Basicly, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. I guess all the pre-preflighting and over inspection was causing more problems then it was preventing.I recalled the early days at Walker AFB, when a Tech Rep was required to accompany the B/N troops on all the maintenance preflights.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newury Park, CA USA -
THE NIGHT of the RT UNITS. In 1961 at Loring AFB, asI came to work one morning, M/Sgt "Sparky" Spangler, shop chief, approached me as I came into the Bomb/Nav shop and told me there wa a big commotion out on the flight line about RT Units. We hopped into a van and drove out. Sure enough, there were four RT Units stacked up in front of a B-52 and a peeved T/Sgt LeRoy Chase further out front, smoking his customary corncob pipe.We asked him what the problem was and he stated that all four RT Units had been checked out from Service Stock and all were bad.Anyone else we would have questioned more but LeRoy was one of the finest technicians that I had ran across.A man of few words, you would normally see him smoking his pipe and studying his Tech Order (pocket sized one given out by IBM remember them?) prior to going out on a work order. Usually he had the write-up solved before he hit the a/c. As it turned out, of course he was right. One shop shift had repaired the units without aligning them and the next shift, assuming they were completed, had yellow tagged them and put them in Service stock.
Ron Larson <antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
February 20, 1963-February 20, 2003 A Tribute to 1st Lt. Thomas Joseph Hallgarth- Bomber Navigator By: Tammy Josephine Maher I started wondering how 40 years can come and go so quickly when it occurred to me that I have almost outlived my father by 20 years. He would have been 63 years old two days ago with his last sun setting at the age of 23. His B-47 and crew perished 40 years ago today. He would have made a career in the Air Force. His career spanned a mere few years. His mission now complete, mine is to find out more about him, his crew and if possible to find their children. I am almost 40 years old, married fifteen years and have three children of my own. I thought about the questions that have haunted me since I was 7 when my parents told me that I had another Dad, one that was in heaven. Most of the questions still linger and time seems to be running out to get the answers. My 9 year old son fell in love with the Air Force after I took him to an aviation museum in Sacramento at McClellan Air Force Base March 1, 2003. Like a ghost town, we explored the outdoor tarmac with great enthusiasm. As he ran from plane to plane, he could hardly contain himself. Is it genetic? Was my Dad that excited when he went to flight school? Oh the stories those planes could tell if only they could speak. We thought we heard their whispers as we visited them. My boy played with the radar equipment on one large Œbabe¹ like he lived there and knew Œher¹ My son really liked the nose-art. He¹s a boy, what can I say? My son is an old soul who possesses his grandfather¹s eyes. I bought him a flight jacket and a pencil sketch of a B-47. I tried to answer all his questions about his grandfather. My Dad trained at Mather AFB in Sacramento, not too far from McClellan, completed Navigator school in Texas and died serving at the base in Lincoln, Nebraska. He rests in Golden Gate National Cemetery. He expected to retire with the military. He probably would have served in Vietnam. Then waxing nostalgic, I pulled out an old suitcase my Mom gave me about six years ago that contains all that I know about 1st Lt. Thomas Hallgarth, and I showed the Lieutenant¹s grandkids the stuff that he left behind. There are the USAF wings, hats, pins, and buttons. There is the Air Force Officer¹s Guide, as fresh as the day he got it I suppose-I doubt he had time to read it. Just off the Cuban Missile Alert of October 1962, he was still new to Lincoln Air Force Base and his crew, February of Œ63 when he died. He was posthumously ranked from 2nd to 1st Lt. so the certificate says and there are the lettersŠ.the many notes of condolences from President Kennedy to the Mayor of Comfrey, Minnesota, all mailed on official looking stationary to my Mom, who refused to open her door when the car pulled up to their house on the base that day, Feb 20, 1963 when they came to tell her that he wasn¹t coming home from the simulated low level training flight of that morning. There are the pictures too. The ones of a newly married couple-just starting out-and the pictures the Air Force took of my Mom receiving a Commendation medal ­ 8 months pregnant with me and all alone. There are the little trinkets ­ mostly of a life short lived, of a savings passport book, a wallet, a keychain, a Catholic Missal. His Air Force pictures in his uniform, serious, smiling, and one with a parachute. I inherited his eyes, his nose and his sense of humor. While filing through his personal effects, most specifically his pictures, I experience the feeling of looking in a mirror and seeing someone you think you¹ve known all your life but haven¹t met yet. Who am I? Who was he? Whatever happened to the families of Capt. Donald Livingston, Lt. Col. Lamar Ledbetter and Lt. Michael Rebmann, the crew that didn¹t return. My Dad was born and baptized in New Jersey in 1940. He was a good student, especially in math & science, which makes for a good navigator. He was a boy scout who loved big band and rock and roll music and he played the drums. He hung around the Jersey shore and went to the same High School as Jack Nicholson, the actor. My Dad loved playing in his garage band, The Rockets, and could do a pretty awesome drum solo, according to school chums I was able to find. I can only imagine what a clown he was or so people have told me. In many ways, we are so much alike. His best friend from High School, Bill Stanford, found me eight years ago, and his stories from the High School years are priceless. Bill said the "Rockets" were asked to audition for the Ted Mack Amateur Hour but weren¹t selected to appear on the showŠthey were beaten out by a musical spoon act. I never would have known that story had he not told me. We are great friends now and having Bill in my life has been such a blessing. Each little story is but a small window into the life that was my father. One of the things most treasured in my Dad¹s suitcase is the letter from the Mayor of Comfrey, MN dated March 5, 1963 To the Family of Lt. Hallgarth, The past Saturday afternoon, March 2, our community held a memorial service at the site of the B-47 crash, the place which has truly affected your lives. I am trying to express our sympathy to you and yours. Words have a futility at such a time as this but it may be said that never has a community been more united in wishing to convey its¹ most sincere expression of sympathy to the wives and families of these men who gave their lives in the service of our country. We, the people of the village of Comfrey, and also the nearby farming area, feel that these men so guided their plane until the last possible moment to avoid crashing into the village, because of this effort, their bravery saved many lives. I¹m certain it could be sincerely stated ­"Greater Love Hath no Man ­ than he who gave his life for his country or his fellow man." Prayers for you and yours have been heard in churches of all denominations in our community. You, the families of these heroic airmen, have our deepest sympathy ­may their devotion to duty help you in these trying times and may God give you strength to carry on for them. Arthur J. Lilla ­ Mayor Comfrey In the course of trying to find more information about those years and about my Dad, an unusual thing occurred that involved a close friend of mine, whom I have known for the last five years here in California. She and I were talking about the B-47 accident a month or so ago and she read the Lincoln Star newspaper article about the crash. She called her Mom who was raised in Minnesota and found out that it was her two uncles who recovered the pilot¹s bodies from the wreckage that day. Another bond across time and space between us. A truly small world. In some way, it was a consolation for me that I was able to find out about this. My story is not unique. It is a common thread running through the tapestry that is our military family in the United States of America. A story of sons and daughters, wives and mothers, husbands and fathers, who in serving their country, died for Her, perhaps never knowing their own children and leaving many grieving loved ones behind to start over. It is the Supreme Sacrifice. They are the sacred ones whose names are carved in stone in the rows of concrete which grace our National Cemeteries and move us to tears. What gets me are the ages of some of them, like my Dad & his crew members, at the twilight of life at age twenty-three. His crew members being 23, 31, and Col. Ledbetter 41 at the time of their deaths. Did they think of us as they realized their fate? -I think so. Even in the course of duty their thoughts were on others, those they loved and those they did not know but were willing to protect. How we live this gift of life is what really counts. Life had to go on and it did for my Mom, who remarried, giving me my lifelong Dad- my buddy, a new name, and a family with two sisters born in the late 60¹s. I¹m the odd one though, somewhat taller than them, and just different, not better. It¹s the parts of me that I can¹t find in them that must be him, the man I never knew. But I get glimpses now and again in the eyes and faces of my children, his grandchildren, his legacy which has gone far beyond February 20, 1963. As I come into this anniversary year since that day 40 years ago, some questions remain unanswered. How did Lt. Col. Ledbetter¹s children fare? Is it true that Capt. Livingston¹s wife had a baby girl after the accident just like my Mom did with me? What happened to Lt. Rebmann¹s family? I am bonded to these people by a single day and I can¹t find any of them. Which is why I decided to write this in honor of my Dad. First to say thank you to all the heroes of the 343rd for serving our country. The 98th Wing was the strong-arm of the cold war era. I feel part of your family. Your service means more than words can express. You are America. Secondly, if you are reading this and can give me any more stories to share with my children or store in my heart, I would be grateful to hear from you. I will always be a daughter of the 98th Bombardiers and hopefully a Pyramidier by proxy. God Bless the USA. Tammy Maher 3627 Waldwick Circle El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 USA 530-676-2467 jdtam5@sbcglobal.net
JD & Tammy Maher <jdtam5@sbcglobal.net>
USA -
Unfortunately did not get into Bomb Nav until Nov 82. Attend BNAV class at Lowry and assigned to 319th AMS Grand Forks AFB, ND. Worked with some of the finest BNAV techs. Switched to B-1B IATE when Grand Forks converted to the B-1B. I'm very proud of the people I worked with in both career fields and extremely proud to be part of both aircraft. Retired in 1994 when B-1B left Grand Forks. DOD smartly decided to shut us down instead of the other three wings. Smart because we could fly ours out. If they closed one of the other three they would have to haul them out on a rail car or by truck. Anyway, great job on this site. One note of bad news for anyone who knew or worked with Donald K. Nelson. Don died in September 1999. He was a great friend and fishing partner. He is missed by me and my family. Holidays aren't the same without him and fishing will never be the same. Don had a lot of great stories about BNAV and would talk for hours on the subject. Don was a loner who was hard to know but would do anything for anyone. Don was stationed at K.I. Sawyer, Mather, Fairchild, March, and Grand Forks.
Terry Decker <tdeckerb1b@aol.com>
Grand Forks, ND USA -
Any of you old gray haired F--ts out there that were at Little Rock AFB in the 70th or 384th A& E Squadrons from 55 to 61 still able to sit up and take nourishment? If so let me hear form you. In the Subject put LRAFB so that I will read it before deleteing it. I spent about six weeks in the RB wing before transfering to the 384th Bomb Wing. I arrived at Little Rock AFB before they had enough barracks so they let me go home to Hot Springs for thirty days without charging me leave. The only thing that I ever got out of the AF that I didn't earn. :)
Daniel W. (Dan) Hawthorn <dwhawthorn@aol.com>
Lowell, AR USA -
Just got to Glasgow in Sept 1961 as a bran spanking new three level. A1C (have no idea what that is in todays' airforce) Mussleman was my trainer. Back in them days we were issued a full complent of tools which included a 3 foot long stake-on tool. One of our jobs was to carry our trainers tools. Most guys carried their stuff in the little canvas bag that was part of the tool issue. But not Mussleman. He (read that as me) would take his compete tool box out on the job. Even when we went to to debriefing. Man that thing wieghed a ton. Sure glad when I was assigned to Willi Nash. He carried all the tools he needed in his pocket. Once a year we had a tool box check. Any tools that had been lost or stolden were replaced. After my first check I elected not to do any more, after all I could keep track of my tools. Once I got my 5 level, I adopted the Willi Nash method of carring tools. Seem to work pretty good. As I neared the end of my enlistment, the airforce gave an early out to folks who had enlisted from Dec 7, 1960 to Febuary 7 1961. I got out twenty days early but my good buddy Grey had enlisted on Feb 8th. there was one angry GI. Any way to make a short story long, on my next to my last day, I went out to help on a problem. Took my canvas bag filled with most of my tools. Left it on the Nav's table. Must have been a TA problem cause we spent most of our time in the cockpit. When we came down to the Bomb/Nav section, my tools were gone. Called the MPs. Made out report. Went to supply to turn in what was left of my tools. Well, it seems that the report would take about two weeks to go through the channels. So, it cost me $34.14 to get out of the service. Some where there is a moral, I think. take care trinidad
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, Wyoming USA -
I served in bomb nav at Walker AFB from 1960 thru 1963. We are looking for some of the old troops that have not been in touch for many, many years. Anyone who served there in the early 60's, please contact me or 'Mac" McDonald. He can be reached in Maryland at (410) 592-5360. We have held 4 great reunions in the 90's and all enjoyed the experience. If any of those old B/N guys happen to check this site, PLEASE get in touch. We have found quite a few lately and we want to hear from some more. Thanks E.J. Ericksen
Erick J. Ericksen <ejericksen@usadatanet.net>
Norwood, NY USA -
My best bud from our old BNS days told me about the site. Have lots of stories and pics from Fairchild, in the early 80's. P.S. Was the TA EVER supposed to work correctly?
Steve Neylon 92MAAMB 1981-84 <ApacheFog@aol.com>
Parma, OH USA -
I LIKE TO GO TO THE MOVIES THEY MAKE ME LAUGH
Jim Lamont <james.lamont@whiteman.af.mil>
Whiteman AFB, MO USA -
Thank you for producing such a down to earth site. As a writer I can tell you are a skilled communicator. Thanks again.
Communication Skills
Davenport, New York US -
Hey! Nice site. If you are ever in Las Vegas let's play golf. lonniejames@hotmail.com.
Las Vegas Golf
Las Vegas, Nevada US -
Standard practice until the mid 70s at Mather AFB was for all maintenance new arrivals to the 320th AMS to be issued a full set of tools. All shops had a large rack where all the boxes were supposed to be locked up when they were not in use. Security in terms of keeping your tools locked up was a topic visited frequently in the all the shops. Msgt. Bob Warren was the Bomb/Nav In-Shop Supervisor when I arrived at Mather in 1973. Sgt. Andy Stahl was one of the flight line troops there for a while. Andy had the twin bad habits of leaving his tool bag sitting unsecured in the area as well as leaving his box unlocked in the rack and then leaving work. Bob chewed Andy out over this several times, and then started calling Andy at home and demanding that he come back to the shop and properly secure his tools. But Andy still kept forgetting to lock up. Bob came out of his on-base house one morning, headed for work, and discovered his kids' cat lying dead in the middle of the road. Bob just scooped it up and put it in the floorboard of his Triumph; he didn't have time to do anything else. The cat sat in his car all day, and this happened to be one of the days where Andy left his tools unsecured again. Bob called Andy and told him to get into the shop and secure his tools right ASAP. Then he headed out to his car. He jumped into the car, saw the dead cat, and grabbed it and went back into the shop. He grabbed Andy's unlocked toolbox off the rack, took it to one of the workbenches and opened it up. He turned it upside down and emptied all Andy's tools onto the workbench. Then he grabbed a couple of tubes of EPOXY and emptied them into the bottom of Andy's toolbox. Then he tossed the dead cat into the bottom of the toolbox and carried it back to the rack.
Terry McKinney <tmac3931@hotmail.com>
Tobaccoville, NC USA -
I have a brother-in-law stationed in Germany, so far he has not been sent to Iraq. My family and I would like to say thank you to the men and women who are fighting for our freedom and wish them a safe return home to their families.I feel that if the United states has to show that we are not going to stand for any thing against the United States. May God Bless you and your families in this time of war! Be safe and take care of business.Also thank you to the people who have fought in the past for our freedom and rights.
Patricia Poynter <patriciapoynter@msn.com>
Eubank, Ky USA -
I have a brother-in-law stationed in Germany, so far he has not been sent to Iraq. My family and I would like to say thank you to the men and women who are fighting for our freedom and wish them a safe return home to their families.I feel that if the United states has to show that we are not going to stand for any thing against the United States. May God Bless you and your families in this time of war! Be safe and take care of business.
Patricia Poynter <patriciapoynter@msn.com>
Eubank, Ky USA -
Andersen AFB legend: There were either 6 or 7 Andersen G-models shot down during Linebacker II in December '72. Of course, maintenance records went down with the aircraft. Legend has is that an equal number of MADRECs were pitched off the end of Patty's Point into the deep blue ocean below. The ghost of Charlie 70: An A/C parked on C-70 launched on a mission. The plane drilled into the ocean off Patty's Point. Two days later, another Buff was parked on the same site. About midnight, the crew chief was sacked out in the gunner' seat. No one else was on the bird. He reported feeling a touch on his shoulder, and looked up and around to see someone or something dressed in wet flight gear, complete with helmet. He said that seaweed was hanging off what ever it was. The crew chief jumped from the gunner's seat through the open hatch below without touching anything during his egress. Guam Mods? TA was NOT a priority on Guam, so many of the TA computers were SNAFU - warning lights illuminated, etc. We didn't have time to fix them. We disabled one of the switches and removed the lamps from the warning indicators. The plane was then prohibited from flying low-level. Andersen birds flew with a host of signed-off Red Xs. The last bombing mission was flown on Aug 14 or 15, '73. Overnight, SAC started reinstituting all the things that were overlooked when the focus was to keep the bombs falling. We started doing TA alignments and all the other stuff that was overlooked. Spit and polish reared its head too. I was working a plane one morning and got pulled off to go stand a squadron open ranks inspection. I looked at my boots - they hadn't been touched since I got there. Fortunately, we had a couple of cans of black spray paint on the bus. In Tin City, all the freeform cubicles were broken up, and the bunks and lockers were rearranged according to the book. The barracks cleanup also began. The floor of the barracks I lived in was brown when I arrived there. I got off work one day, and came back to the barracks to discover that someone had been tasked with GIing the floor. I was amazed to see that there was an aqua colored tile under all the brown! The best chow hall on Andersen was the one on the North Ramp. I always tried to eat breakfast there when I could. There was a Guam native girl who worked there, clearing the tables. She was a HUGE girl - her nickname was C-5. I remember one morning where I took my tray to a table, then went to get juice. I returned with my juice in time to see C-5 carrying my tray away, munching my bacon as she walked away. The Yom Kippur War started in October. The decision was made to return all the G-models to their peacetime base assignments; and all their oops went with them. It took either 2 or 3 days from the time I learned of the decision to get them home. The only G-model left on Andersen was the hangar queen, 222. It left, but had to turn back. Andersen was a spooky looking place with all the G-models gone. It was like a ghost town - or ghost base. But then, there's a lot of those these days.
Terry McKinney <tmac3931@hotmail.com>
Tobaccoville, NC USA -
Ain't those maintenance folks on the 52s doing a great job!! .....thanks for all your efforts....us retired folks owe you a drink, anytime. Well done!!
Eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
Great site! I spent a single enlistment term B/N from 6/72 until 5/76. I've spent the last 4 days trying to remember names of the B/N troops I worked ( WHo said hindsight is 20/20?). I know I didn't get them all - especially the folks I woked with on Andersen in '73 - but here goes: Terry McKinney 6/72- 5/76 Lowry AFB 8/72-3/73 My BN class: SSgt. Bradshaw - Sets instructor A1c Alan Trammel- CO, to Titless WAF (procurement) A1C Tom LaPointe - Wright-Patt A1c Christiansen - Griffis? A1c Thompson - Wurtsmith A1c Roy Gifford - Fairchild Lowry BN students - other classes A1C Ed Abel A1c Wes Fullwood Mather 320th BW BN troops I remember MSgt. Bill Cobine Tsgt. Pat McDermott SSgt. Paul Porter MSgt. Bob Warren TSgt. Billy Reynolds SSgt. Jim Nagel Msgt. Dustin TSgt. Campbell SSgt Orv Hansen MSgt Ted Patterson TSgt. Ted Dlugosz SSgt. Larry Anderson MSgt. Joe Alex TSgt. Don Brass SSgt. Larry Piepmier TSgt Jerry Johnson Sgt. Gerald Mooneyham A1c Bill Richardson Sgt. Obrien (OB) A1c Bob Jones Sgt. Andy Stah Sgt. Rick McGill Sgt. Armond Wilhite Sgt. Mark Barber Sgt. Tom Wetzel Sgt Alan Riedel Sgt. Ernie Riedel Sgt. Ken Martin Sgt. Tim Riley
Terry McKinney <tmac3931@hotmail.com>
Tobaccoville, NC USA -
Hi, when I made my orignal entry my address was dwebster8@kscable.com. Its now dwebster8@cox.net
Donald Webster <dwebster8@cox.net>
Wichita, KS USA -
Good Work Jon. I was wondering who the yay-hoos where. Blot them out !!!! B-52's Peace through Strength. Victory through Annihilation.
Gene Lewan
Medical Lake, WA USA -
We got spammed! Some war protester jacked up the guest book but it is back up now. B-52... Keeping America free for over 50 years!!
Jon
USA -
God bless America.
Spirt of Bombnav
USA -
Old Bombnav troop. B-47 Lockbourne 56-59, Mcdill 59-62, Lincoln 63-65, B-52 Seymour-Johnson 65-69, Barksdale 69-73 with 1 yr tdy to guam, Grand Forks 73-76. Then retired. Spent the next 20 years in Electric Warefare at Robins in civil service. retired in 96.
Glenn Kees <ggk34ga@cox.net>
Bonaire, GA USA -


Early in the 1970s I worked on a satellite surveilance system (still in operation) that would detect and track all Russian missile launches.At that time, Russia had about 2,000 nuclear armed missiles aimed at the USA excluding submarine and A/C. We would run a test program that would simulate simultaneous launch of these missiles.It was a sobering sight to see a map of Russia with simultaneous initiation of 2000 launches and as tracking occured, the predicted impacts, in less than 40 minutes,on USA targets .These launches never took place, probably not because of love I suspect, but more likely because of the deterence of SAC bombers and missiles on alert status so as to respond before obliteration.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Nebury Park, CA USA -


A gentle reminder for Kim.......We all agree that war sucks. In SAC, our job and the task of the current military was/is to ensure that a war is NOT fought on American soil.I'd say we've done our job and done it with honor.....However, Kim, you too have a job as a peace loving, freedom enjoying American. Your job is to ensure that each and every American is respected for who they are, assured of their right to liberty and the pursuit of happiness.That each citizen is assured of a safe environment, free from crimes of rape, burglary, murder,kidnap, corporate greed and incest. ....We've done our job Kim, why the hell don't you start doing yours?
Bill Eirish <Eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -


to kim jenson: you might remind your little boy that those of us on this web site spent many long hard hours maintaining the bomb/nav systems on the war birds that won the cold war so that perhaps her son wouldn’t have to.
Charlie White <cwhite@castles.com>
Fairfield, CA USA -


Thanks for the good words, but I would like to see this stay on the board so everyone can be reminded of what is out there. We, and others, fought so these people could do this. Thank God we won.
Gene <GeneCo@Hotmail.com>
Los Gatos, CA USA -


way to fire Geno i guess you noticed the dude (ess) didn't have the nads to put her e-mail address on her comments. of course dude esses don't have nads any way. the naivete' of these persons continues to amaze me. getting a real job would probably help out their prospective a lot. contributing to society instead of criticizing would help a lot too. i hope jon gets on this right away with a big eraser. keep the faith al hall
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -


Wow!! Golly gosh.. You mean it's THAT easy? You sure opened my eyes. That means that in the 1700's the people could just have loved good ole' King George. In the 20's they could have had parties and cake with the sweet, lovable Kaiser. In the 40's we could have just gone over and covered good ole' Hitler and that scamp Tojo with Love, Love, Love. Of course it was too late to invite 6M jews to the party. Now, maybe we can go over and party hearty with that loveable little imp in Iraq. Of course, it will be too late to bring back those fun loving people he gassed. The women he beheaded in December for protesting, and the deformed Kurdish children he had gassed. But, what the heck that was all in love. Right? Right? Someone...Anyone....Bueller? Maybe the American GI's buried in foreign countries because of their LOVE for your freedoms and liberties would have been spared if they had just listened to you and loved the people that were trying to take away those same liberties and freedoms. Thanks for your deep insight and flash of perspective. Remember, nobody hates war more than the people that have to fight it, but know that sometimes it has to be done. I hope they just love good ole' Saddam to death. God bless and protect our troops. Peace out Dude(ess)
Gene <Geneco@hotmail.com>
Los Gatos, CA USA -


(I see ole Kim used spam as her email address... just like a war protester... too chicken to put anything of value on the line.  Men and Women have died for her freedom here in America... I bet she would spit on their graves as long as she can have her French Coffee and Apple Computer.......Get a Grip on reality)

I'm happy to sign your guestbook.

consolidation loan   credit card debt
My little boy came home yesterday and asked why people go to war.
equity loan
It was hard for me to explain except to say that some people have forgotten how important love is.
refinancing mortgage
Let this serve as a reminder to everyone. Love and Peace.
mortgage lender

Kim Jenson
Atlanta, GA US -
Just found this site today,16 Mar 2003, GREAT SITE!! Iwas a BNS toad for many years. At Lowry 1960-1961. 5th A&E,Travis AFB CA 1961-1964. 7 Level School at Lowry 1964-1965. Back to Travis 1965-1967. Ellsworth 1967-1968 with a paid vacation to Guam Jan-Jun 1968. Then to Lowry as, at that time, BNS instructor on FB-111. Then off to RAF Upper Heyford UK, F-111E Automatic Test Station Operator 1970-1974. Then back to my first and only love Bomb Nav at Castle AFB 1974-1976. Then to Luke as a WCS/INS FTD instructor on F-15's 1976-1978. 1978-1980 FTD F-16 WCS/INS instructor at Hill AFB UT. Retired in 1980. I would love to hear from fellow BNS troops. Reconized some of the names i.e. Dave Ross Travis 1961-67 and Earl Polly, Guam Jan-Jun 1968. Keep up the good work on this site. Ben McCormick (Mac)
Ben McCormick <mccormic@visi.net>
Newport News, VA USA -
Does anybody remember my father Arnold (Arnie) Sorem ? Dad was a B/N Troop he retired in 1973. He was stationed at Carswell, Dyess, Blyeville, Larson, Moses lake . I joined up in 1976, My first station was at Carswell 1976-1980. I was a Crew Chief on 0586,0692.0073 D models of course. Retired a line Chief in 1996, flew on the same Buffs my Dad did. We would seat around for many hours talking abought the good old days, Dad died DEC 11 2000, but he was sharp to the end. He was still doing TA allingments in his sleep. I would like to here from anybody that remembers him I sure miss him and the stories. Thanks (One Of The Twins).
Jim Sorem <jimsorem@attbi.com>
Rowlett, TX USA -
http://www.1heluva.com/cgi-bin/join.cgi?refer=17476 COOL WEBSITE....GO KICK SOME BUTT GUYS AND LADIES!!!
Sherri <heluva76@yahoo.com>
USA -
for those of you who may be interested there is a "gathering of SAC eagles" at castle air park, formerly castle afb this coming oct. the details are listed at www.stratofortress.org which is the b-52 stratofortress organization web site. you california guys have no excuse however guys like myself and zellner will have to hit the road early. ........................keep the faith ...................al hall (alfie)
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Mastagni and Raftopoulos. That sounds like a personal injury law firm. I have no doubt that he was the same Mastagni who was at Rapid City in the mid-fifties.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Mastagni and Raftopoulos. That sounds like a personal injury law firm. I have no doubt that he was the same Masgagni who was at Rapid City in the mid-fifties.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Mastagni?? Seems to me that we had a lt/col Mastagni as Co of the 4141 A&E in 1961 when I got to Glasgow AFB. Back in the early days of Glasgow, the A&E Floor of th barracks didn't have a CQ. When ever the barracks phone rang, Whoever was closes to the phone would answer. One week Mastagni and the first shirt Msgt Raftopoulos conducted an inspection of our floor. This must have been during an ori or Bar None. Any way the place was a mess. Mastagni, at the next commander call, call our place a pigpen. That night, Mastagni telephoned the floor. One of the com/nav troops (think it was Wilson) answered with a "Mastagni's pig pen which hog do you want." Mastagni went ballistic, wanted to know who answered. Wilson hung up. Next night, we had an NCO pulling CQ. Guess you had to be there. Cheers
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, WY -
I was a Com troop At Elmendorf 1979 to 82, and Wurtsmith 81 till 88. My best man at my wedding was a Bomb/Nav troop. Nothing but good times with Bomb/Nav troops. Would really like to contact some of the crowd from those days. WODERFULL SITE KEEP IT UP.
Tom "Ogre" Lowe <TCDCANDPR@Aol.com>
Bedford, Oh USA -
Hey Bob, I was at Keesler AFB from August '51 till Feb '52. Fundamentals and Q-13 school. Old Army non air conditioned open bay barracks.School 6 days a week, three shift operations, class KPs, mess server duty and marching everywhere.Sen. Kefaurer (sp) was conducting his probe on prostitution and gambling in Biloxi.Top 10% of graduates got their second stripe.Then I was assigned to a ground AC&W site.But we were making $78.00 a month, wasn't it great!
Ron Larson <antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
Back in 1951, the Electronics Fundamentals class was located at Keesler AFB, Miss. and was 22 weeks long. The B/N class was also located there and was 13 weeks long and covered either the Q-13 or the Q-24. The K-systems school was still located the the Sperry factory. My question is, when did it all move to Lowrey, and did they shorten the fundamentals class at all?
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Oh, THAT General LeMay! When I was at Rapid City in 1952 training at the local FTD to get ready to go to Ramey, our instructor, a TSgt. Parra, was also running an in-flight maintenance class for the RN's. There was a know-it-all Major in the class named Mastagni who expressed some wonderment that "all those little Bomb-Nav troops out on the flight line know all this stuff your teaching us?" Parra responded, "Sure they do, of course it didn't take them as long to learn it".
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
I retired 7-1957 665th AC&W Calumet, MI. Great little place
Gene H. Rice USAF-RET <magrice@hotmail.com>
Mondovi,, WI USA54755 -
After exchanging a couple of emails with Bill Hawkins, I recalled another happening at Robins about 1963. Lt/Col Tolman (A&E Comm), smoking his custmary cigar, approached Bill and I and said that he had been asked if the In-flight Maint. Manual could be improved to make it easier for the RN/Nav to locate the failed unit to be swapped. We pointed out the pictured locations, color coding and all already in the manual. Then Bill said " maybe we could run strings from the units that the IFM manual says to replace over to the actual units in the equipment rack itself.Them they could just follow the string, hand over hand, over to to the right unit." Lt/Col Tolman laughed as he walked away but I thought it was one of Bills better ideas.
Ron Larson <antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, Ca USA -
GENERAL CURTISS LEMAY WAS THE FOUNDER OF SAC. HE THEN BECAME CHIEF OF STAFF OF THE AIR FOACE. HE PROBALLY DID MORE FOR THE ENLISTED MEN THAN ANY OTHER COMMANDER IN MODERN TIMES. I WAS AT LOCKBOURNE AFB OHIO ON RB47E,S THEN WE GOT ECH47 FROM BARKSDALE. IN 1959 I WENT TO GRIFFISS AFB N.Y. WE STARTED THE 4039 BOMB WING AND I WAS IN AERO REPAIR. IN 1962 IWENT TO RAMEY AFB PR WHERE I WAS IN TRANSIT MAINT. EVERY JAN. WE HOSTED THE WORLD WIDE COMMANDERS CONFERENCE, TWICE I GUIDED GEN LEMAYS PLANE TO HIS PARKING SPOT. I NEVER MET HIM, BUT DREW A CROWED. IN 1964 I WAS SENT TO A HELL HOLE CALLED KINCHLOE AFB MICH. UPPER PINCH. 10 MONTHS AFTER 10 YEARS 1MONTH AND 11 DAYS, I LEFT TO GO TO WORK FOR ALLISON DIV GM. I RETIRED AFTER 27 YEARS BECAUSE I HAD OPEN HEART SURGURY, AND RETIRED SO MY WIFE COULD HAVE MY BENIFITS IF ANY THING HAPPENED. SO MUCH FOR MY LIFE.IAM NOW 66YEARS OLD AND GOING STRONG, BOB
BOB SHADBOLT <DAD-SHAD@MSN.COM>
INDPLS, IN USA -
General LeMay? Who was he? :-) Ron Larson, I seem to recall the phrase "highly paid tech rep" floating around at a lot of SAC bases back in the 50's and 60's.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner!@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Tales from the "mole hole' (NCO stag bar at Loring AFB). One of my deer hunting companions was M/SGT Sparky Spangler, NCOIC of the B/N shop. Sparky was blind in one eye- but thats another story.He was a great fisherman but a lousy hunter.Consequently, as I was only after a trophy buck and Sparky was after meet to feed his large family, I agreed to shoot the first deer I saw, providing he would put it on his deer tag.So for two years in a row, Sparky had a deer hanging in his backyard on opening day which actually I had shot.But he acquired a reputation as a master hunter and would be sought out while we were tipping a few in the "mole hole" for his expert advice which he would freely expound on after a wink at me.i seemed to remember the phrase "highly paid tech rep" which seemed to be brought up when a new round had to be paid for. One memoriable night after passing an ORI, the Wing Commander bought a round for the whole place.A SAC legend for the youngsters out there.Gen. LeMay was asked onetime if ORIs were completely fair as sometimes just some bad luck might cause a failure. He replied that as far as he was concerned, that there was no difference in being unfortunate or incompetent.
Ron Larson <antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
To Alphie: I remember well, it was things like that that made it fun to be B/N troop. Too bad we didn't get a picture.
Charlie White <cwhite@castles.com>
Fairfield, CA USA -
re: the restoration project. i'll call the park in mobile and ask them if their cockpit is intact. if so i can take a run over there and get some photo's for you. another way is if some of these younger guys reading this have some tech data left over from the old days, showing the layout, they could help you out. when i retired the "d's" were being relagated to a sea surviellance mission and the dbns was a punch card reading device called the aou, (automated offset unit) it was scheduled to be mod into the g's and h's i did put an inertial nav system into a g at barksdale in '76 it was laying around a program office at wright patt. it was still flying when i retired. i heard it went into the d upgrade. blast from the past.................do you remember the night fiedler made a rope out of wax cord and hung james redd up over the shop door? i remember maj. vacarro coming into the shop to use the phone talking to job control and then looking at redd and saying something like what's he doing hanging around? keep the faith alfie
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
To Alfie: One of my post retirement careers was as a welfare worker for Riverside cty in So Cal and one of my coworkers was LCO Edge's daughter as the saying goes the acorn doesn't fall far from the tree. I currently am a volunteer at the Travis AFB museum were we have a BUFF 56-696 it is in a sorry state, I just started and plan to start restoring the cockpi first. the A/C was a digital BNS from Carswell when it arrived here in 1983. On a slightly humoruos note SAC billed the Museum for the 40,000 lbs of fuel that was aboard. I have never seen the digital BNS and we have no tech data on it, so I have no idea how the lower deck is supposed to look. Keep the worl informed on the happenings at Castle in Oct. Sounds interesting. Vince Peraino lives in Merced, I think. Later!
Charlie White <cwhite@castles.com>
Fairfield, CA USA -
back to you charles................... two things come to mind when i read your input.................the night you killed the rat in the coffee shop with your syringe while holding it with the broom.....................and your favorite trick blowing smoke through plastic tubing by the modulator on the mock up...... went through west texas the summer before last and saw some of the old turf we flew over. it was just like yesterday. the mansion facade from the movie "giant" has now collapsed and is just kindling. but then so are we........ never forget going across mcallester ok at 100' at 6am. pucker factor was maxed out. but then bill edge (now deceased ) was at the yoke. heard from blinky wilkes awhile back. he's living in austin very retired. will send you his e-mail off the board. as i told ron larson under direct e-mail they're having a thing at castle this oct. might be good to get together and watch each other's eyes water up. there's a "d" on display at battle ship park in mobile alabama that i visit on occasion to bring myself back to reality. keep the faith alfie.........
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
For Alfie Hall: The low level training route that you were referring to out in the Davis Mtns of W. Texas was "Poker Deck" 15-3 or 15-6 if you recall we would fly two flights a day on Saturday when they were checking the Bergstrom crews out on T/A. They would fly the route and terminate with a camera attack on Alpine or Valentine TX, I can't remember which. The wrench taped in the radome certainly wasn't our proudest moment, but as Terry Feidler would say it was a good" farmer fix" but then there wasn't a heading error. Your mention of Gen. Wells reminds me when we were on Guam in the fall of 1967 the Bomb Nav truck was dropping the night shift troops off in front of the Airman's club when Wells pulled up behind them and told them to police the area, one young troop took off running into "Tin City" and suddenly all the troops ran leaving the general standing there. We did have some good times over the years Bomb Nav troops were a tight bunch
Charles White <cwhite@castles.com>
Fairfield, CA USA -
Bill McKenzey!!! OK I answered your email, now refresh this old brain. Ain't been back to upper Maine since Loring. Get enuff snow and cold this year right where I am on Cape Cod.
Bill Farris <dipnet@gis.net>
Chatham, MA USA -
Loring AFB Me from 67 to 74. BN Tech. Rep. Was there with Bill Farris, Art Plant Sgt. Barnett, Sgt. Lions, Sgt Higgins. Now working at Space Division on the GPS program. No more Snow or 40 below Boresights.
Bill McKinzey <Billy.McKinzey@LosAngeles.AF.MIL>
Hawthorne, Ca. USA -
Loring AFB Me from 67 to 74. BN Tech. Rep. Was there with Bill Farris, Art Plant Sgt. Barnett, Sgt. Lions, Sgt Higgins. Now working at Space Division on the GPS program. No more Snow or 40 below Boresights.
Bill McKinzey <Billy.McKinze@LosAngeles.AF.MIL>
Hawthorne, Ca. USA -
Loring AFB Me from 67 to 74. BN Tech. Rep. Was there with Bill Farris, Art Plant Sgt. Barnett, Sgt. Lions, Sgt Higgins. Now working at Space Division on the GPS program. No more Snow or 40 below Boresights.
Bill McKinzey <Billy.McKinze@LoaAngeles.AF.MIL>
Hawthorne, Ca. USA -
Anyone remember the Rendezvous and the Turf Club in Rapid City?
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
BOMB NAV RULES. I GOING TO PASS THIS SITE ON TO THE OTHER TROOPS WHO WERE STATIONED AT FAIRCHILD. ESPECIALLY THE MEMBERS OF THE PELICAN CLUB AND PRINCETON SHIFT.
Gene Lewan <AZAmes242@aol.com>
Medical Lake, WA USA -
I was involved in the training for "Wing X" to go to Ramey, but I was already at Rapid City when the training started. I waa transferred to the new wing and went through complete Q-24 training again and when they were getting ready to ship out the new wing, they transferred one third of the personnel to the 28th and a like number from the 28th to the new wing to give them a nucleus of experienced personnel. Guess who got transferred back to the 28? Thant's right, me! It made a lot of sense to me, NOT!
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
I was in B-29's in 1951 at Fairchild AFB in Spokane and went to RB-36's andto Rapid City SD for training in 1951 and then flew to Ramey AFB Puerto Rico as a radio/ecm/gunner and spent 2 years in Ramey. aour primary aircraft was no. 4492022 but we had a number of flights in 4492015, which was a problem aircraft for us as we made 3 emergency landings in Mcdill afb in Tampa Fla with engines out. We flew 2022 to north Africa in 53 and over England and France and back to Ramey with no problems. It was a great airplane in my estimation even with the engine fires and other problems. Thanks for the good site. My aircraft commander was Louis T. Pines and he was a good officer.
Dean Body <dbody@theofficenet.com>
Kettle Falls, Wa. USA -
Been looking at this site regularly and decided to send a couple of pics from Fairford. Okay, I was OAS (B-1B) originally from 1989-1994 (Grand Forks AFB) but found the light Barksdale AFB 1994-2000, and keep the BUFF in good words today 2000-present Instructor at Sheppard AFB. I'd send some old tech school pics, but maybe you don't want B-1 trainer pics....
Bill McGurk <sabmc@yahoo.com>
Sheppard AFB, TX USA -
At Griffiss AFB circa 1961,on a friday afternoon, I was out on the flightline assisting on a repeat writeup. Early evening, the trouble found and corrected, we returned to the A&E bldg. where I encountered Lt/Col McKinney, A&E Comm. (a fine officer and gentleman).He said that the decision had been made at the afternoon maint. mtg.which I had missed, to request Depot assist.and a TWX had been sent.I assured him that the A/C was ok and that depot assist (a mixed blessing at best) should be canceled.A tough spot for him but he said maybe he could scrape up a crew for a test flight tomorrow morning.Then he asked me if I could make the flight also and I agreed.The crew was staff people, no EWO or gunner or instructors.and not too familiar with the system.I had to point out a few of the switches to them.Off we went to the RBS where we made two Large charge runs with four excellent scores.No writeups. Returning to the base, I was able to move from the IN positiom (commode) up to the IP position to watch a landing for the first time.The copilot was making his first solo landing and it was a beauty. Turned out to be about the most perfect flight that I ever went on.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
mugu@mugu.comoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
mugu@mugu.com <mugu@mugu.com>
USA -
The early scoring of bomb runs by the Nike sites was dreaded by the R/Ns.An example of what could happen occurred about 1961 with our Bomb Comp A/C at Loring. Both our A/C made consecutive hi altitude, straight and level runs against a Nike site (checking out our last minute tweaking) and received scores of 10200' and 10400' in about the same location.Immediately after the site closed down.There were no system writeups.After checking croosshair placement and plotting the actual groundtrack,we determined that there was no way we could have received such scores. We accepted the 200' and 400' as the actual ones.At the time you could not protest and appeal and get the scores corrected.That year, in Bomb Comp, we recieved the best bombing scores but lost because a tanker ground abort cost us half of a mission that the air crew had gone ahead and completed. I'm sure Cecil Hinson remembers this one.
Ron Larson <antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
I didn't know the site was down. But noticed no comments for quite a while. Started at Altus AFB, 11 AEMS in 1960. There my nickname was "Moose". I remember, Shoemaker, Carl Norton ( if he has a email address sent it to me ). Keep up the good BNAV sight.
Donald Webster <dwebster8@cox.net>
Wichita, KS USA -
I just fixed the guestbook.
Jon
USA -
I just found ot about this website from an old Bomb/Nav tech, Lenoard Mcgaha here in Shreveport/Bossier Louisiana. I was in the 55th
Jim Engelke <silverfoxjae@msn.com>
Shreveport, La USA -
for ron larson................ when the last resort bombsight came out the tcto was written for field installation. i remember shooting the a/c with a transit with something on the front cutouts as a reference...................then i remember the system mgr changing the level to depot installation. we had a nike site at bergstrom and the day i made my first nike defense bomb run (1900') the a/c went and made a last resort run behind me and they gave him a shack. talk about taking a few hits from the upstairs gang. gen wells was the division cmdr. when i was at westover, he threw guys out for the slightest infraction. i left westover in dec 58 and he had a car wreck during the christmas holidays. guess he didn't retire because of that. i think he went to guam after that. talk about a real sphincter..................... keep the faith al hall
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
I think about 1967 at Plattsburgh AFB, T/Sgt Larry Knobbe NCOIC of Autopilot section determined an error of some type in the alignment of N-1 compasses from depot and wanted me to verify it before stirring them up with a UR or TWX.A couple weeks later, the A&E Commaander and Larry came and got me, showing me a TWX saying the Depot agreed with us and had corrected it and now we would all go and show it to the DCM.On the way, the A&E Comm. picked a red butte can, wrote with a felt pen "May your gyros always keep spinning" grabbed a handful of wild daisies and put in the can. We proceeded to the DCM's office, barged in and the can was placed on his desk.He said "What the hell is this"? Thr A&E Commander showed the TWX and said the Depot confirms that we were right about the N-1 compass problem.The DCM paused for just a couple of seconds and then said, "Get the hell out of here"!
Ron Larson
Newbury Park , CA USA -
At Loring AFB in 1962 I think (the year of the big snow) I was helping out on the boresighting of an antenna. We attached the boresight fixture, sighted through it and placed the test equipment as far out as we could, which happened to be in the 10 foot snowbank across the runway.After screwing around for awhile we fired up the radar and looked for the return signal but got nothing. Finally we went across the runway to check the test equipmnt but it was gone.We trudged in the cold back to the shop. There we found that the DCM had picked up the unit in his pickup and was lecturing our Maint. Supr. about neglect of test equipment.We were pretty pissed off about it and he ended up apologizing profusely. Any old timers remember "map matching" runs or the "last resort" bomb sight in front of the pilot? How about how SAC IG Gen. Selmon "Sundown" Wells got that nickname? During the very early years of SAC, he was known to say about non performers, "I want that man to be a civilian before sundown".
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webiv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
Anybody got any good bird strike stories? We had a good one at Fairchild in the 70's that required the fire department hose down. The ones of us assigned to manually pick the parts out designated ourselves "The Gut Patrol". Even wrote it on our orange hats! Nice hot day with the horsehair and broken antenna parts everywhere!
Ruben Ontiveros <rfdo1055@aol.com>
Spokane, Wa USA -
Hello to all the old Bomb Nav Troops out there. Lot of history to look at. I started "Fundys" at Lowry in Dec '73 and went through Tech School starting in Jan''74. From there I went to Fairchild Nov '74. As you all know, at that time Bomb Nav hardly went anywhere. So I sat for years, got married and finally got orders to Grand Forks in 1980. After another five years I was able to go back to Fairchild and there I sat until retirement. Yeah, I saw pre-EVS all the way to STRAT. Got pretty good at TA Alignments. Even did a few airborne (Boresight Pot and R-23 adjustments with O-Scope). Crew was really trusting as long as they didn't know what you were doing.
Ruben Ontiveros <rfdo1055@aol.com>
Spokane, WA USA -
Way back in 1960, before the days of ACR, I was tech repping with the 11th BW at Altus AFB, OK. One day we got a bad modulator in the shop and it was diagnosed as a bad power supply, which is a depot reparable item. There weren't any in stock, so I decided I'd open it up and see if I could fix it. Unfortunately, I forgot it was filled with oil, and when I got the last screw out and lifted up the cover the oil spilled out all over the bench, me and the floor. I stood there with a red face while all the guys in the shop laughed like hell! It sure made the point that tech reps are far from infallible. Another day some guys came if from the flight line complaining about a problem with the radar display. They had changed every subunit that could cause the problem, so I advised them it had to be a bad Topo Comp. So, they changed it, but it didn't fix the problem. My name was duly entered in the Bird Dog Hall of Fame as the only person to ever bird dog a topo comp. Very embarrassing!.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
the new mexico peak larson is speaking of was on the way into lajunta co. did that one many times as well as hastings, ironman, badlands, pepper pot, as to the ob (oil burner) route numbers, its been too many years i think hastings was ob-27 but not sure any more. back to the west texas thing this was an area containing the davis mts. the glass mts.some of the peaks are close to 6k ft. we also would go to del rio and fly around laughlin afb but all the flight student butter bars would form up close to see the big jet. there was also an area near mc allester ok. that was an entry inot ft. smith ak. but all these were not controlled and you did your thing vfr, there was no rbs and the only thing on radio was country and mexacali rose.
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
RE: Comments from Willy Farris...................Willy WAS a super BombNav troop, about as smart as they come. Knew the system, knew the tie-ins and wrote most of the 3 level BN course at Lowry. Great instructor plus loads of line experience with 52s.................However in answer to his allegations.....Everyone knows that BN troops REQUIRE rewards to accomplish any task, that's why we're AMS. In this case it was beer and pizza. Too, we all know that if you didn't spend your budget, the budget was REDUCED the following year(Hawkins taught me that) Too, we know that
Eirish <Eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
In the extreme NE corner of N. Mexico is an extinct volcano named Capulin. This was an entry point into a lo-level route across the Raton Pass area and across southern Colorado.Much of the early TA flight tests were conducted there.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, ca USA -
Alfie........Where the hell did you find a "peak" in west texas, to cal against? Were you using dirt piles or the west texas state tree(phone poles). Which reminds me of an LLLC we were attempting in Texas. From the pre-mission film, OPs picked a turkey farm for the offset AP, bright shiny metal that NO ONE could miss. WE DID, seems in Texas they move the turkey houses and forgot to tell us. You ever fly OB-18 at 150 feet?
eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
my brain worked today and i was reminded on the t/a days or dayz as they were sometimes known. to enable the flt. crews to fill their 50-4/50-8 requirements i flew every saturday for about three years 62-65 out to west texas. the standard sortie was to cal the system against a peak and then fly a nav leg with a bomb run against alpine or marfa. my job was to tweak the system based on the cal results. after that i would either ride the ip seat or strap into the ewo seat which was empty on these mission and crank up what ever receiver it was that locked on to fm radio. during one of these sorties while tooling around and getting knocked all over from the thermals the r/n called up and complained that his sweep had stopped. i dropped down for a look and discovered the nav scope in the same shape. no circuit breakers were popped so i advised the r/n to turn the system to standby. we went home early and upon landing exited the a/c i happened to put my arm up on the chin dome and it was soft as an eggshell after being cracked. it was then the co-pilot said he had thought we had hit a buzzard but he wasn't sure. i guess the motto of the story is if you're going to hit a bird make sure it's big so you can go home early, unless you need the flying time keep the faith alfie
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Geesh Eirish. I see comments about your GI parties at Lowry. Ha! I remember a few, slopping the paint around and the beer. Remember re-writing all that darned study guide material? How about the trips to supply point for all the stuff we really did not need?
Bill Farris
USA -


Got an email from Billy Burke as in Hope, Arkansas. He said that his latest Barksdale retiree paper said that Sgt Raymond Smith passed away. Smitty acquired a pizza shop franchise after he retired in the 70's and did quite well. He was a shop troop while I was stationed there. Wish him many good RT alignments in the sky. Also, does anyone have a location on Charles A Stevens, Gary E. Barber, or Mike Nolan who were B/N Troops at Barksdale in the early sixties?
Fred J. Double <Fpooderdoo@aol.com>
Bristolville, Oh USA -
I am seeking information concerning my father James Johnson,Jr. He served in the army from 1962-1966. I know that he was stationed at Toul AFB in 1965 and I believe he was with the 97th engineering Bn. Co. B. He was stationed here to the best of my knowledge from at least Aug. 1965 - Dec. 1965. He also had a nickname that many people used and it was "Red". If anyone has any information concerning him please contact me at erjohnson2@msn.com. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Earl Johnson <erjohnson2@msn.com>
Livingston, SC USA -

One more and then off to bed. Circa 71 WPAFB. RN comes into debriefing looking to sale a bad bomb. Wrote up run away crosshairs on one bomb run. Next day I reviewed madrec and sure enough he was chasing something with the crosshair control. Moseyed over to BNAV OPS and asked to review the film. sure enough he was chasing something. Seems the offset was a train station and the RN just happened to hit as a train was pulling out. While trying to chase the train,, he put one in the boonies. True story. But that is just one of many.
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
Clayton, NC USA -
Old story: Once upon a time and this is no shit...... I seemed to always be the one on call to talk to distressed RN' after the midnight hour. I always kept an In-Flight Maintenance manual an a -26 by my night stand. Sure enough, one early morning about 2 or so the phone rings. It is the Command Post patching a desparate RN into me. Seems he is about 20 minutes out from IP and while running the checklist everything went to hell in a hand basket. Had an altitude hole, TAS and HA were frozen. Asked for the values, told him to take it out of bomb test and wished him happy trails. Really happened while at SJAFB circa '75.
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
Clayton, NC USA -
Happy New Year BNAV!
Jason Mattocks <jasonmattocks@earthlink.net>
Germantown, MD USA -
Found out about this site in a Christmas card from Dick Mosher. Sure brought back alot of memories, mostly good. I went to K school in '68. Spent 5 years at Seymour Johnson, 7 at Griffiss, 2 at Castle, and my last 5 up here at Loring. Been out for 12 years, but after seeing this site it seems like yesterday!! Glad to hear from anyone who might remember. Steve
Steven Sandelier <sssrpqi@mfx.net>
Presque Isle, ME USA -
Found out about this site in a Christmas card from Dick Mosher. Sure brought back alot of memories, mostly good. I went to K school in '68. Spent 5 years at Seymour Johnson, 7 at Griffiss, 2 at Castle, and my last 5 up here at Loring. Been out for 12 years, but after seen this site it seems like yesterday!! Glad to hear from anyone who might remember. Steve
Steven Sandelier <sssrpqi@mfx.net>
Presque Isle, ME USA -
Just looked up your site thanks to Steve Sandelier. Great stuff. Lots of familiar names and stories. I was a Bomb/Nav troop from 1969 (graduated 30SEP69) to 06Nov72.Spent time at Beale,Loring,Carswell and Guam. Bruce Dearth,Tony Trimarco, Joe Sepos, Steve Sandelier,Mike Hadley and Bob Cook were in my graduating class. I keep in touch with Tony and Steve... anyone out there know the where the others may be? I looked up my old roommate Bill Davis while I was CA last summer. He still lives in Marysville,CA. We met at Ginny's Bar. Shared lots of old stories. The bar is closed but Ginny still lives in the same old house behind the bar. We drank Diet Cokes around the old card table, quite a change from the old days. I look up Dave Fouche and Don Brass when I get to the Dallas/Ft Worth Area but I haven't talked to them for a couple of years. Keep up the good work.
Len Wheeler <lensandy@montana.com>
Helena, MT USA -
Great site. I worked Bomb/Nav at KI Sawyer AFB, 410th AMS 1972 to 1979.
Bob Broene <rjbroene@macatawa.org>
Holland, Mi USA -
Great stuff & lots of memories. I was at Lowry in 1969, then was at Loring, Maine from 1969 until 1977. What a long, strange trip it's been. God bless you all.
Tony Trimarco <trimarcot@aol.com>
Grand Forks, ND USA -
Happy New Year. I would like to locate Gene Wade. Gene was and excelent B/N man.I lost contact after he xfered to Ft Worth, I was suppose to go there but decided to get out instead.Would appreciate any info. Thanks
willie perdue <w1perdue@aol.com>
vinton, va USA -

Merry Christmas to all Bomb Nav'ers.
Jon and Cindy
USA -

Well guys and gals; It's Christmas Time. I spent 3 Christmases in Glasgow AFB. Could have been a lonely time I suppose except for my B/N family. Usually had Christmas dinner at one of the NCO's homes. Payback was baby sitting while they went to the NCO Club. I sure miss the warm welcomes all of us lower grade GI's got from the families. Every now and again I think about all the good times and spirits with Willi Nash, John Clovis, Kidder, Plourd, GD Young, light Green, and all the other B/N troops that attended the many parties. Even Col. Bonitz came one year. Thanks to the families of Frank Clark (deceased), Johnny Morrow, Joe Chounier (sp), and Darrel Daley. Merry Christmas to all Trinidad Herrera
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, by God, Wyoming USA -

Bomb/Nav? Sounds familiar. I was Altus AFB 63-67. Kinchleo AFB 67-69. Out in 69. I loved the old bird and still use the troubleshooting lessons in work today. A great challange. I was one of about 5 that were qualified on the Aircraft, shop and UTE. I was a shop troop. One day while in Michigan in the winter I was asked to boresite and the temp was about 10 degrees. I quickly lost my Aircraft qualification after that.
John J. Holman <w9dnd@arrl.net>
Northfield, MN USA -


Regarding Charlie Schleininger: Charlie passed away today. He had been a 321X0K at Lincoln AFB, NE, and was one of the best techs ever. No trouble. He fixed aircraft and enjoyed life. He was responsible for several mods that made our life on the aircraft a lot easier. Charlie was very active in helping his community, both in the military and out. R.I.P. Charlie
Gene <Gene@AStreet.com>
Los Gatos, CA USA -

I am searching for any one that was at Lowry Air Base Denver CO around 1952 that could give me some info about an instructor that was there at that time. His name is Leon L. Thompson. He is my father. I have never met him, so any info about him would be VERY helpful. Thanks Joe Joseph E. Thompson USA -
Joseph E. Thompson <jumper1952@hotmail.com>
USA -
anybody out there ever know my uncle Robert Lumley (nickname rocky)he was in 36's when he died around 1955--he was in 17's during WWII (I was told his B-17 AC nose art was "ramp tramp"-- thanks in advance Cliff
Cliff <polky@snowcrest.net>
weed, ca USA -
Did a Google search on my old USAF job code 32150K just for the heck of it and hit this site. Good idea. Went to ASB4/ASB9 school at Lowry AFB in 59 then to Beale as Bomb/Nav Tech for the remainder of my 4 years. Worked the fightline and then in the shop on the bombing radar systems. Got training on the ASB/16 terrain avoidance system. I was good friends with Alver "Pat" Patterson and Ken Johnson who were also in Bomb/Nav but have lost contact with them over the years. If anyone knows their whereabouts please let me know. Got out in 63 and settled in the Boston area until 77 then moved to Buffalo. Presently occupied as an electronics test engineer with Intel Buffalo.
Francis Sawtelle <francis.sawtelle@intel.com>
Grand Island, NY USA -
Just looked at the Ramey AFB history site and couldn't find any reference to the 72nd and the RB-36s. Was I asleep for three years in the mid 50's?
John Wire <paragons@skypoint.com>
Minneapolis, MN USA -
Hey...where are the old hacks from the 384th Bomb Wing (Medium)? Anybody out there stationed at L.R.AFB from 1955 through 1960?
Frank O. Hunt <frankohunt@hotmail.com>
Charleston, SC USA -
I was a gunner on a B-36 at Carswell AFB in 53, and a tail gunner at Walker AFB 54 to 56. I met another B-36 gunner, Roger Tell in 02 at Cas Lake, Minnesota. I would like to contact Ken Tyson, (Pilot) Roofer (A/C) and Bull Turner our bombadier at Carswell
S/Sgt. John bohney <Johnbohney@aol.com>
St. Louis, MO USA -
web site for info about Ramey, AFB. www.rameyafb.org nick gerbasi contact me.
ed jones <amxjones@earthlink.net>
wrbg, mo USA -
Nice site. I enjoyed it very much!
David Jay <david_jay58@hotmail.com>
USA -
I went out on a debriefing - B-52D, sometime around late '65 I think. At Moses Lake (Larson AFB) this was held in a trailer adjacent to the refueling pits. We were sitting in the trailer for a hell of a long time while the crew was staying in the bird for some reason. Finally after about 30 minutes (??!!) they got out and filed into the trailer VERY QUIETLY. This is the story they told: They were flying along at cruise when the A/C for some reason looked out to Port and there was a glowing ball of light right off of the Port wing. While he was looking at it they pulled away from it. There was some discussion about it and they were asking the tailgunner about it when he said, "Here it comes!" It then came up the Starboard side of the aircraft and sort of hung off of the wing for a couple of seconds and then they pulled away from it again. All of a sudden it passed the aircraft up and pulled directly into the path of the aircraft. This bright ball about the size of a basketball was coming right for the windscreen and it scared the living hell out of the cabin crew. As it was about to hit the windscreen it went up and over the fuselage in the slip stream. The tailgunner told them, "Here it comes again!" and it went by much faster than the plane was flying and turned directly in their path again and appeared to stop cold. This time I think that the pilot tried to climb over it and the ball hit the chin radome with a trememdous blast, a flash of light and it shook the plane. They Mayday'd and flew back to Larson. You know flight crews and I assumed that this was the mother of all practical jokes. I walked out and looked at the chin radome and there was one of those cartoon jagged line lightning bolts plainly visable inside the layup. The outside was perfect with no burns, scrapes or pitting. Just like from Depot. Except this lightning bolt showed plainly in the layup. This was really a good practical joke but I knew how they did it - they'd painted this thing on inside the radome and the translucent material allowed it to show through like that. After refueling they towed the bomber over to the recovery pad and I was there to pull it apart and catch their joke. When I opened that radome the original paint was still on the inside. The cartoon was a little fuzzy on the edges but looked plainly just like what you would draw as a lightning bolt in a Woody Woodpecker cartoon. The cartoon was INSIDE of the layup and showing through. Ball lightning is funny stuff.
Tom Kunich <cyclintom@yahoo.com>
San LEandro, CA USA -
Who remembers this? About 1958 at the 6th Bomb Wing, Walker AFB, Three of A&Es finest (one a B/N troop) were out for a night on the town in Roswell.Somewhow they decided that it would be a great adventure to go to the local zoo and cut off the tufted tip of the resident mountain lion's tail. Caesar by name. Amazingly they accomplished this and and made another round of the bars displaying their trophy.Caesar was much beloved by the townspeople and needless to say all hell broke loose.Maybe it was something in the western air because around the same time an AP guarding a B=52 parked out in the boondocks and bored at watching jackrabbits, decided to practice his quick draw ala New Mexicans Pat Garrett and Billy the kid, managed to shoot a hole up through the wing of the A/C he was standing under. Too bad we didn't have the "space alien" defense yet.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
Great fun reading your web site. Brought back a lot of memories, I was a BOMB/NAV troop from July,1966-Nov,1972. The majority of it spent in B-52Gs with about three months of B-58 school at Little Rock before the program was shut down in 1969. Some of the names I recall are: Barksdale, '66-'69-- Billy Burke (from Hope, Ark, Home of the World's Largest Watermelon), Dan Gillikin, Phil Pittman, Tom Lingenfelter, Clifford Shoates, Earnest Jones, Reasonover, Bynum Jenkins, Jerry Malone, Jerry Ferrero, Tom Lyskawa, Cousineau, George Weiss, Richard Mulhare; Seymour-Johnson, '69-'72, Steve Rogers, John Niederkorn, King Wilson, K.O. Chapman, Kerry Brown, Tim Helwig, David Ventry, Jim Chandler, James Cotton, Bernie Becker, Duck Dimmick, Glen Love, J.C. Holding, Dale Schnitger, T.A. Tommy Thompson, Ryberg, Swisher & Chastain. Of course there are more that I can't think of right now but they all left something with me. If anyone has info on any of them drop me a line. I'd love to know what happened to them. I have kept up with some of them but not many.
MIKE GREENE <MGREENE11@COX.NET>
BYRON, GA USA -
It was the winter of '66 at Grand Forks AFB.I WAS A Bomb/Nav SSGT working a tour in Job Control. (What a blessing. I volunteered for the job nobody wanted. 40 below zero on the flight line and 78 degrees with a steaming hot cup of coffee on the inside) WHEEEEOOOWWWW...WHEEEOWWEE. A base alert. I struggled to my feet at 3 in the morning and headed for the giant composit building sitting next to the flight line. I can't remeber the code name but it was a much anticipated ORI. All I know is what happened next is something I rember vividly. It was the show of a lifetime. It had snowed heavily during the night and the wings of the BIG BUF "H" modles sat with mounds of the white stuff that resembled ski slopes. We didn't have much time before launch. But how could we possibly De-Ice that many airplanes and still make take off times?? EASY!!! or so thought our DCM, Col.Wong (real name)and wing commander Col.Moffett. The two Full Bulls came up with the idea of a "HOTBOX". That's what they called it. A hotbox. As many of you know the aircraft are paked tail to tail in rows of five. That's 40 jet engines revved up at a comfortable level. Now all we had to do was taxi the alert birds between the rows of running engines. The heat would melt the snow and ice thus eliminating the de-icing trucks and save valuable time. It worked!!!! the snow and ice melted from the taxiing aircraft. That is while they were still in the so called "hotbox". Do you know what happens to water at 40 below zero. OH MY GOD, says Col. Wong..HOLY SH--T says Col. Moffett. Everything that was supposed to move was frozen solid. The enire ORI mission was aborted. Who made the decision to create this "hotbox" the big would ask. Both Wong and Moffett were great guys. Real friends to the troops. We couldn't let them take the blame for this CHARLIE FOXTROT. The senior controller on duty was a SMSGT Anderson(43171-E). Anderson could Chew gum...drink coffee and smoke unfiltered Camels all at the same time. It was my fault he said. I came up with this brilliant scheme to save time. Anderson took the blame. Wong and Moffett were off they hook. It was now up to them to take action against SMSGT Anderson. And they did. They promoted him to CMSGT and until now nobody but us folks in the 319th Maintenance Control section knew what happened. That's been 35 years ago. And you know those same aircraft are still living up to the original motto. "PEACE is our PROFFESSION". I don't know what ever happend to Moffett, Wong and Anderson. I left Grand Forks in 1968. They were still there when I left. Respectfully, Frank Hunt
Frank Hunt <frankohunt@hotmail.com>
Charleston, SC USA -
What a great site! Brings back lots of memories. Not a BombNav'er myself, but worked for a few ...that's another story. Was AutoPilot at Castle and Eileson 63-66, AutoPilot and ECM at Ramey 67-70 ... Tom Ferrebee was our DCM. Was ECM at Seymour Johnson 70-71, and then ECM at Utapao 71-72. Cross trained to 511X1 after Thailand and spen time at Langley, USAFTAWC at Eglin and finished up at AFMPC Randolph. Amazing the memories that came flooding back as I read through the guest book. I will do more thinking about the BombNav'ers I met through the years and post some more information as my brain properly gets hold of the past. Again, thanks for a great site.
Mike Lawler <mlawler@suscom-maine.net>
Brunswick, ME USA -
Chet Seidel ring a bell to anyone? SSgt at Dow in 66, then Robbins.
bill <eirish1>
sac, USA -

RE: Debriefing........ Thank God for the Chiefs of BombNav Ops who attempted to keep his little "kiddies" straight and for the DCMs who backed the troops, plus the super BN Chiefs I always managed to work for. Yup! lots and lots of "ill informed" left seaters(upstairs and downstairs" thought the world should recognize their expertise.(?) Usually woundup with an ass-chewing at the morning standup, from the wing commander.But me, Being a kind, considerate and compassionate person (Anderson will choke on this)I usually told the idiot that he reminded me of my wife. To which they would ask WHY? With a straight face I would reply....." She doesn't know a f..king thing about Bomb Nav either." ......P.S. I owe lots of favors to lots of Chiefs for bailing me out. IT WAS FUN!!! "Intelligence will always triumph over ignorance and bliss", a direct quote from Eugene Kopp, MSgt USAF, retired.Then from somewhere in CA is the BN motto (E Pencillus Whippus".
bill <Eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
Down at Robins circa 1970, we had a pilot named Big Jim (last name ommitted in case the big bastard's still alive and can read this), who ALWAYS came into debriefing with one TA writeup - "TA INOP". It was very difficult to get details and his CND rate was very, very high. But, one night, he had something new. He wrote up the upstairs TA dessicator. Said it was smoking. We understood that the brushes in the motor had probably vaporized since he mentioned lots of black smoke. During the "clarification" of the writeup, he said he had made it stop smoking. We asked how. He had reached back behind the CP seat where the dryer was mounted and yanked all the wires out of the plug! No CND that time.
Larry Anderson
Waitin On Turkey, OK USA -
Back in 1961 I was working with the 11th BW at Altus AFB, OK when they won the Fairchild Trophy. This authorized the A&E Squadron to make two enlisted spot promotions. They promoted the lead BN T/Sgt to M/Sgt. and then promoted a T/Sgt in the auto-pilot shop to M/Sgt. The CO's rationale was that he'd take the M/Sgt's stripes any day, even though there were some S/Sgts on the team who did more to with the Bomb Comp. There was a lot of pissing and moaning in the B/N shop, but there was no way to change it.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Around 1962? at W/Robins AFB, we got a new A&E commander who was quite innovative. He arranged a "go to work with hubby day" for the wives and allowed a pari=mutual type betting on our ORI bomb scores. Odds were were established as a combination of A/C and RN bomb score averages as compiled by MDCAU better known as "malfunction Junction". I remember that the commander asked T/SGt "Peeps" Hawkins about promoting a T/Sgt M---- to M/Sgt. Peeps replied that if we had a whole Air Force of T/Sgt M-----,that we'd have nothing!
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Nebury Park, Ca USA -
Just read the post about arguing with a crew member at de-brief. While not of sufficent rank or intelligence to de-brief, one Ssgt Dedee came back to the shop , at the 42nd AMS with writeups after a de-brief shaking his head and cussing. An RN, a LtCol to be exact, had written up the time to go indicator stating that by his stop watch it was 2/10 of a second off. when they made their bomb run. Apparently this guy did it every time he flew. I thought 2/10s off was phenominally accurate.
George Mogle
Chambersburg , Pa USA -
Re:Debriefing, I'm sure you've all heard about the RN who wrote that the ECO (Erection Cut Off) light came on during flight, so he changed the bulb, but it still kept coming on. This is supposed to be true, but I can't verify it.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Hadn't seen a good whiney crew at debrief story lately so here is one. It was late swing shift in the arctic waste land known as Griffiss AFB. I had doned my parka and trudged from AMS to the debriefing building next door. The crew came in and was complaining about TA WARN lights at 2800 AGL. In a moment of weakness I tried to rationally explain it was OK. The pilot said he's call sheet said 3000 so the plane was broke. He had lost training and wanted a code 3. After a futile attempt at further explinations i asked to see the forms so I could read the entire 3 block write-up. I signed it off and handed him the forms back. He turned a little red and re-entered the write-up. I took the forms and signed it off again. He then turned a brighter shade of red and entered the write up yet again. He then said something like. SSgt Burkhead, you will not sign that write up of in my face again. I agreed and said I would wait for him to leave the room. By the time it got back to the squadron the next day (We were back in on day shift for "Training Day") i had told the DO to FO. My commander asked what my problem was and I told him the story. He was an ex BUFF pilot and went to explain to the Captain that if he ever pulled that shit again he would give him a check ride to remember. So, I'm in the clear right. Well not exactly, My branch chief, a fighter weenie by trade, tells me if I ever argue with a crew again I will be barred from debrief. I held the laughter until i left the office. I had just been told if I argued with a flight crew, I would have to stay at the shop and drink coffee while someone else went out in the cold to go to debrief. I then started planning what to pick a fight about at my next debrief.
brian burkhead <bburkhead@netzero.net>
montgomery, AL USA -
Nice Site, Keep it up!!
private Krankenversicherung <webmaster7@qualityinsurance.de>
Munich, -
Trinidad Herrera here. Seems like there are a lot of lifers on this site. That's good, you guys lived through the evolution of the Bomb Nav systems. Most of us guys that served 4 years usually worked on one system so some of the terms you guys use are a bit strange to us. Is the wine cellar the same as the Hell Hole on the C's and Ds.? What the hell is a weenie, I've never heard any one called that. Been call a lot of other names tho. Refer to my post back awhile ago when I stopped in at Lowery and visited the museum. There wasn't one reference to any of the schools we attended much less any of the mockups. How come? Are there any mock ups on display any where. I've never seen any information on them. This is where you lifers come in. You guys may have the contacts to procure mock ups of the various B/N systems used since the Norden Bomb Sight (there is one at the Lowery museum). They gotta be some where. Seems there is a lot of B-52 restoration programs in progress, why not a Bomb Nav museum or something some where, maybe Lowery. I still have my flow scroll of the MA6A-7A system and another of the ASB-15 modification. I would be plum glad to donate them to some organization that would display it next to a mock up of the system. We sure do a lot of talking about our old days, but when we are gone, the history of B/N dies with us. We shouldn't let that happen. This is a challenge to all Bomb Nav Troops.
trindad herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, WY USA -
una biko i don land this place oooo
kessington idemudia <kess@mugu.com>
EKPOMA, EDO USA -
REWARD... free drinks at the club.. Looking for Don Howe, P.J. Myatt, Denny McCullough, Henry Nelson Kell, Scot Story, Frank Matlock, Henry Harrison, Walt Thompson and Jon VanWagoner.Got an email???
bill <eirish1@attbi.com>
sac, USA -
joe's gay
Kelly Monaghan <www.bookboy12345@aol.com>
Burlington, ONT CANADA -
i remember my instructor for data flow in tech school a/2c henry howell. we had two fellows for sets that were more interested in reading hot rod and other auto mags. they got so interested that 80% of the class was failing. so they brought in a civilian who really taught you how to troubleshoot. never forgot what he said. while going thru q-48 school i turned the instructors flying ice cream cone upside down every day for 6 months. then one day we locked him out and demanded a new instructor. and we got one.
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Eirish was the shift supervisor at Lowry (mid-70's - the calendar years, not his age!) on C-shift. We only had a couple of classes at one time, and Bill thought it would serve the BN community better if we provided significantly more in-depth training than the plan called for. So we spent a lot of time on the mock-ups and, most inventively, Eirish would send the more senior students into the other classrooms to conduct training for the junior troops. This really worked well, enhancing the training for all the kiddies involved. We turned out a lot of excellent 3-levels during those years. We also did some other "unorthodox" things with these guys, like shutting down early on Friday to GI the joint. That's what everyone else did, but we included passing the hat for beer and pizza money, enjoyed by both students and instructors in the instructor's lounge. Good times (and it was certainly hell on the home front, wasn't it?)
Larry Anderson
OutThere, OK USA -
RE: The story of "this ain't no BS"........Would you believe a Boeing, sustainig engineer, to speak the truth? Especially a B-1 retread?.......................However in this case Larry has spoken the "gospel truth". The "Hawk" is exactly as depicted,though he must have been in an exceptionally tolerant mood that day. One LC made a narrow escape from the wrath of Hawk.
Bill <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
Re: Ramey, this wing was created at Rapid City AFB, SD, (now known as Ellsworth) during the summer of 1952. It was known as "Wing X" and they brought in a lot of Q-13 BNS troops from various SAC bases around the country, (many from Biggs) and assigned them as cross-trainees with the three bomb squadrons at RC. They also put them in classes in the local Field Training Detachment. I was selected to join Wing X and had to go through the training sylabus even though I was a qualified Q-24 tech, but I figured it was worth it to get transferred to Ramey. After all the training was finished, and a few weeks before we were to leave for Puerto Rico, they took one third of the Wing X troops and reassigned them to the 28th at RC, and took a like number of troops fromt he 28th and put them in Wing X so that one third of the Ramey wing would be experienced. To my dismay, I was one of the guys reassigned to the 28th, even though I was fully qualified and experienced. My first sergeant then promised me I would get the first available transfer out of RC, so in the fall of 1952 I was transferred to Carswell AFB, TX. It was only after I arrived that I found out I was in a new wing destined for Limestone AFB, Maine. (Now known as Loring AFB) Talk about out of the frying pan into the fire!
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
This ain't no BS: In '70, I served in the 19th AMS with a crusty E-8 named Bill (Wild Bill or Peeps) Hawkins. I was a buck sergeant at the time. He sent me out one sunny day to work on a MADREC wide heading trace writeup for the Hound Doggies. We'd tried changing the heading select relay about a half dozen times and Peeps said that I was NOT to change it, no matter what. We "developed" the MADREC tape on the ramp and the trace was still AFU; the AMMS weenies wanted the relay changed. "Not gonna happen", I said. They went back to their squadron and brought back a MSgt who suggested I might wish to reconsider my position. Nope. HE went back and came to the line with a Captain and the freakin' squadron commander, a light bird, bald as a cue ball. The LC essentially ordered me to change the relay and I told him that Hawkins said I should not. He got me and the Captain in a car and we shagged over to AMS. I took them to the shop. Peeps was redlining a stack of 349s about 6 inches tall at his desk. The Hound Dog CC jumped into his face and said that we had better, by God, get out to that B-52 and change the relay. Peeps wore those old GI reading glasses that always slid down his nose. He looked up from the stack of 349s, dropped his pencil, pushed the glasses back up to the bridge of his nose and told the LC, "First off, that relay ain't ours; it's autopilot's and we've just been swapping it out as a courtesy. BUT, if it was mine, I'd tell you to stick it up your ass!", and then went back to reviewing work orders. The bald light bird turned absolutely purple - I thought he was having a stroke! I tried real hard to blend into the paint on the walls, but he found me anyway and wanted to know where he could find OUR commander. I told him and the whole gang disappeared down the hall at something approximating light speed. That was the last we ever heard of the whole deal. I guess our light bird told theirs the same thing. True story.
Larry Anderson
Edmond, OK USA -
I was at Ramey 66-68, but I worked with Bob Betner at Wright Patterson early 70's, he was at Ramey during the B-36 days.
ed jones <amxjones@earthlink.net>
wrbg, mo USA -
Anyone in the 72nd A&E Squadron at Ramey AFB from 1954-1956? Anyone old enough to have been around RB-36's? Remember "007" and the "featherweights"? Help me refresh some old memories and stories.
John Wire <paragons@skypoint.com>
Minneapolis, MN USA -
Had just cleared a hard-to-isolate malfunction near midnight on a winter's eve. It had taken hours...it was in the spaghetti and I finally got it by replacing connecting cables one at a time. Back at the shop I realized that the tool bag was back at the A/C. I was "speeding" across the deserted pad at about 50 in the our "full-race" AEMS stepvan...pissed-off and tired...when the maintenance officer, Lt. Fuzz, asleep behind the wheel of his Ford lizard wagon decided to wake up. I was in the A/C when he stuck his head through the hatch yelling. That scared the crap out of me and I stood up straight nearly giving myself a concussion on the Main Arming Switch housing in the ceiling. I let loose with a string of profanity that would have shamed a squid to compensate for the pain. The look I gave him must have been very serious because he just sank back through the hatch and went back to sleep at the wheel.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
If you ever wanted to see a sorry bunch of guys, you just had to be the BN instructor assigned to teach the maintenance officer familiarization course at Lowry. These "students" were mostly butterbars just out of OTS who caroused all night, showed up red-eyed in the morning and tried to sleep through the course during the day. The BN instructors(ever resourceful and creative, as were all BN troops by definition) acquired a large number of very raunchy porno slides and inserted one into every 5th slot of the projector carousel. (They were available at the Supply room where you also sent unsuspecting BN students to requistition a new "falopian tube" for the radar system.) You could hold their attention for about 4 slides between the wakeup shots. Crude, but effective...right in character for BN.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
REMEMBERING: Pallets of "squadron liquor" slung in the bomb bays of Buffs cycling back from Anderson. WAFs being assigned to Anderson in large numbers for "morale purposes". Little bags of "semi-precious" stones coming back from UTapao Young Tiger. Customs suffering from temporary blindness.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
No Firearms Issued to AF Troops....In '66 when I was teaching BN School at Lowry some of my Photo-Recon weenie buddies(who had been through short-school there and already been to the field) turned-up one evening at my apartment. They were on PCS to an outlying and small base in RVN. They had all just bought pistols while on a layover in Denver because their buddies already over there had told them that the AF had stopped issuing firearms to the troops in Nam, and the base they were headed for was getting hit & run attacks at night by mortars, B40s and little people throwing grenades and satchel charges. Of course, as soon as they got in-country the firearms had to be "turned-in". The AF gave them a locked rack of M-16s in the barracks....and one guy with a key to issue ammo, in case. AF techies could just not be trusted to keep track of a weapon or not shoot themselves in the foot. BN troops would have been more inventive and better armed had they been in-country. Well, there was a lot of crap going on around the perimeter of Utapao early in its existence.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Bill, I just had to throw The Country Club item in there 'cause we're all tired of hearing how tough we all had it on the flightline. It WAS a BN story!
Tom Sanford <tomsanford>
Nashville, TN USA -
Tony Ascanio - I'm pleased to have stirred-up some good memories for you, as some others here have done for me. By the way, The Zanzibar was still open on Colfax in the 60's, but had gone to seed. The "in" place was two blocks back toward town from Syracuse on Colfax. It was called The Blue Onion. Airline and AF types only....and some nurses from the school at the hospital. Lots of pilots and stews-in-training to "fly the friendly thighs"(United AL School)...and BN/Pocket Rocket types. It was a "meat market", but of a more "refined" variety. (The WAF training slogan of "if you just have to do it, do it with an Airman...they're clean" was in-effect.) Had a piano bar and you could hear your steak coming out of the kitchen on its metal platter. On my instructor tour at BN School I managed to be a single troop on separate rats(don't ask) and had an apartment off of University near Stapleton Field. It was heavenly. I taught school on A Shift from 6-12, and unless I had to oversee RT(Remedial Training)from 1-3, I was free. And a five-day work week. It's why Lowry was know worldwide as The Country Club.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
True, honest story. Only the facts have been changed to make BN look better. We're across the pond in Zaragoza, a fantastic place to be stationed. SAC screwed up somehow and gave me a choice assignment instead of snow, snow and more snow. Anyhow, we received reflex birds on Tuesday and Thursday and returned the others home on Wed and Friday.They sat fully cocked and on alert status with JATO for 21 days. Without a whole hell of a lot to do around Z, we became proficient at compass swings, radar(any type) and ECM. Somehow the Navy got wind of us and wanted us to swing a C-130. Now we used the MC-1 (preswung valves) and only needed the north line and about 1 hour.The God's to be arranged the whole thing and us lowly BN weenies met the bird for the swing. The AC was a Chief Petty Officer and the Co-pirate was a commander(major) in the navy. ONE big problem arose....we didn't have a tow bar to fit the 130... The Chief says" Hell I'll taxi this f...ker over that line" Well most tugs took three or four shots to get a bird lined up right on the line. So the chief jumps into the 130, cranks two and I swear he was doing 30mph.... lines that sucker up on the north line damn near perfect and stops dead on the marker.That's when I figured out Navy pilots knew their shit. Compass swung..Navy says thanks and does a spectacular JATO takeoff in less than a 1000 feet.WOW!
Bill <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
One of my fondest memories (hah!) is of swinging the compass on a B-36 at night in the middle of winter in Limestone, ME. The K=system flux valve was located in one wing tip and the N-1 flux valve was located in the other wing tip. Walking back and forth between the two with a 20 knot, -10 degree wind blowing was lots of fun.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
ok guys just one -111 flux valve story. the valves were located in the tip of the vertical stabilizer just forward of the rear looking ir system. when the ground lugs to the flux valves got a little corrosion on them, which at pease was quite often salt air and high humidity took its toll. anyhow the heading would oscillate in sync with the tail nav lite flashes. each time the light would flash the heading would jump a couple of three degrees. you could sit in the cockpit and watch the hsi, adi, the nav control unit, and the computer control unit all do a number. fortunately the instrument shop took care of both flux valves. what else can you expect from an aircraft that would scramble the nav computer if an electric sweeper drove by in the hanger. thanx jon...........
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Tom Sanford, you really brought back old memories. Arrived at Lowry in May of '55, basic electronics on Lowry #1, then a week of k.p. on Lowry #2 in the 3422nd Sturon. Took us to the flight line to chose between fire control on F-100 Sabre or into hanger to see a B-47, wondered what the hell a Bom/Nav system was. Found out in due time. Even back then some guys would squat and spread their legs in front of the Antena in Sector Scan to prevent pregnancy in case the rumor was true. The Stab unit was located on top the table over the Antena, leaned over with the top off and touched the high voltage DC on the Theta motor with the metal button on my fatigues, knocked me on my kester and left a little white spot on my chest which eventually disapeared. After graduation and assigment to 9th Bomb Wing at Mtn Home working on the "B" models with APS-23 and K-4 BNS went back for next afsc level trying to get the !@#$%^() Tracking computer back together. Turned 21 back in Dec of '56, went out the Syracuse gate to corner of Colfax, was a bar called "Club Zanzibar" for my official first legal drink. Ordered a Martini, showed my ID, took a big swig, sputtered and turned red, very bad show. Don't remember the band, they were singing a song about "I know a girl that lives up the hill, she won't do it but her sister will". Used to go down to base ops on Saturday mornings trying to get a hop on the B-25's with the desk job pilots getting their flying time in. Back to Mtn Home for new "E" models with APS-64 and MA-7 BNS, Guam rotation in Oct of '57, bailed out early in Dec "58. Hired in at Wichita in Feb '59, preflight & delivery squaks on B-52G models, ASB-9, Astro Tracker, Doppler and IFF transponder to end of production, Electronics Lab doin initial bench test and alignment of ASB-9A BNS, Dual wageguide Terrain Advoidance Radar and TA alignment; don't think I ever did one in 4 hours thru end of production of "H" models. Was good to see the last one out, 61-0040 at the 50 anniversary in Wichita, but big cover over the hole where the astro tracker used to be! The young assistant CC didn't know an Astro Tracker from a bucket of range marks when I mentioned the cover. The AC "Greybeard" was very gracious and understood us old grey haired Bom Nav troops, told him I would give my left one to ride one TA mission, but guess they don't do that any more. Thanks for letting me bend your ear, any other old 9th Bomb Wing Bomb Nav grunts besides Ran Gemell and Ron Turner, remember the Runway tavern on our way out of town for beer to last untill we got to Boise; Tom, you really stired the old memories, Bomb Nav forefer!
Tony Ascanio <tobaras@msn.com>
Bothell, Wa USA -
RE: Harders comments. A neat book already in print is "The 11 days of Christmas" fairly accurate and conveys what SAC was up against in Nam.Lot's of folks you know are in the book.
Bill <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
I am a former D Model Buff Nav [ McCoy] with 145 Arc light sorties 68 to 70. I am now a writer and have begun a new project, a novel set during the 1972 Xmas Party. I am looking for input from RN's and EW's especially on some details that only guys that were there would know. For example, I would like to know what the offset aiming points used, especially on the nite of Dec. 20, 1972. Also interested in ECM tactics, etc. If you can direct me to any of the guys that were there, would really appreciate it. I want to get the thing right, as much as is possible! Snail mail, for the old-fashioned types, is: Robert O. Harder, 1360 West Belmont Ave., Chicago, IL 60657
Robert O. Harder <RnD.Harder@att.net>
USA -
Mr. Hall (Alfie) To you I give papal dispensation for all stories as a "part time" BombNav troop. Including but not limited to time served with FB111s.
john <VanUnder@whitehouse.com <-----   Is this a joke?  Jon 
USA -
can't do it Eirish Jon said just bomb/nav stories and he's the webmaster. in -111 land we were known as WCIN weapons control/inertial nav maintenance was a piece of cake but the reliability really was horrible. 50% of the maintenance actions were cannibalizations. sorry bucko!!!!!!!!!
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Thule, yea I heard of that place. We had a bunch of EX-B-47 troops ship in from Thule. The whole dam family had a suitcase full of rocks. They got there late fall 1962. When the winter ended in 63, they all put in for transfer to a warmer climate-Thule. Man it was miserable working minus 40 with a 30 mile wind. I was a brand new three level when the old smoke jumper from Idaho, John Clovis and I were assigned to change an antenna on a a "D". Dammed near lost the radome when we slid it off the nose. Had to hold the vent tube mouth right at John's hands while he took them little bitty screws off the wave guide. Burned my hands, froze the rest of me. Then the wind caught the antenna while I was trying the the bolts off. Spun me right off the b-4 stand. After we had started the bolts on the "new" antenna, we replaced the radome, slid it just far enough that we could get the heater vent tube inside the radome. Good place to work, no wind and a lot of heat. As I slid off the radome the stand, I hit my knee on one of the guide pins on the A/C. I was so cold I didn't feel a thing. Happened to notice a small panel on the fire wall of the A/C. John told me that when we had antenna problems that could not be duplicated on the ground, a B/N troop was placed in the radome, buttoned up, and the small panel was remove to allow access for a drop cord and oxygen tube for the troop. Almost bit on that one till I noticed that the small panel was right in line with the little mirror on one of the gimbals of the Stab Unit. Oh, yea, when we got back to the shop and taken off our cold weather gear, I noticed that there was a small indention on my knee. As I warmed up, the indention started bleeding. Hurt like hell too. Take care
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, WY USA -
Alfie's story got to be the best and I sure can't top it. Wrenches in the radome???? No doubt you and Charlie would do that. You win Alf!....Now tell us about those "pseudo" SAC bombers you worked on (Aardvarks). How long were the missions, 45 minutes? Did they pack 108 500 pounder's or slightly less? 2o ALCMs? They were pretty good "ravens" though, no?
Bill <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
Ed, the shroud-cutter solution to sudden life raft inflation did finally get to us. The sheet-metal machine shop took the hooked blade from the standard aircrew knife, lost the hooked end and placed the resulting short edged blade in a wooden handle. It was a practical solution to a scary problem.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
have to counter Eirish's flux valve story with a couple while my memory is still half intact. i was at Bergstrom when the mc-1 came into use. if there was something new either myself or Charlie White or both got the duty. anyhow we were working in the chindome much later in time and charlie found two wrenches in the area where the flux valves were mounted. in those days on the c's and d's they were in the very tip of the nose in an aluminum frame. he said he recognized them as some he had thought he lost in the past, so he popped them in his tool bag. the next time the a/c flew it had a humongous heading write up. so we went out and taped the wrenches back in the spot where they were. they had left a rust outline on the frame. whipped a cnd in the 781 and the a/c flew clean on heading till we closed the wing...... story #2...got to Fairchild in July of '66 outstanding wing, outstanding people. wing commander was then Col. Alex Talmant for those of you who remember. labor day weekend was coming up. we were swapping a/c with the rest of the d wings due to deployments and the big belly mod schedule. got an a/c in from Glasgow with heading write-ups up the ying yang..... problems had been there for at least two years. the flux valves had been moved out to a mid wing position during the conversion to the q-48 system... never knew why but there they were......the wiring had been spliced a gazillion times in almost as many places. to said no more than 2 splices. so here we go long weekend and I'm "selected" to change the wiring just because i found the problem. thanks to Lincoln Davis, my supervisor, he and a couple of the guys built the wire bundle for me between recoveries. comes the weekend and my self and Darryl Frazier and Dan Lightcap hit the ground running. they removed the Adel clamps and the old wiring and i strung the new. you had to slack the wire to allow for the wing flex, which was tricky because it was a best guesstimate thing. we strung the wire thru the wing into the bomb bay up to the pressurized bulk head. every thing that went thru the bulkhead was done with Teflon sleeves and potting compound. since it was a weekend and command decisions were hard to come-by i decided to put a cannon connector at the bulk head. seemed to make sense. we did it potted around the mounting area and built the rest of the cable to the transmission error comp. (tec) we finished up on Sunday night and so we still had Monday off. never swung the compass and the a/c flew with good heading. saw the a/c many times during deployment still doing fine.. would do it again in a heartbeat. your turn Eirish.
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Hello to all, some I know some I don't. Well I can say what a long stange trip its been and my journey is finally over, last duty day was 4 Oct 02 and I final out Next Monday Nov 4. Official retirement date is 01 Feb 03!!! At times I didn't think I would make it but somehow managed. For those of you who don't know me 1981-2003 B-52D/G/H, 1981 Fundies at Lackland with the crypto geeks, TDY en route to Carswell to be corrupted by Johnnie Olson and others, March AFB Jan 1982- Dec 1982 I hadn't seen the name Chuck Wiser aka Mr. Resistor in a while, but he was the first real Bomb Naver to corrupt me. Others including Doug Belt, Jack Simko, Bill Morrisey, Randy Hamm, Karen Opanesets, Eddie Perez, Kevin Irvine, Hardy Schmutzler and others. Next moved to Blytheville Arkansas 1982-1991 9 years in hell... to the day, more fun than a cannon at retreat? Somehow I suspect alcohol was involved, in fact I am sure of it. Got in lots of trouble here! Was corrupted by more deviants... John Gowetski (head deviant), Simko (again. still) Tim Elseman, Kerry Brown, Jim Blevins, Jerry Osborn, Bill McGimpsey, Brian Riedy, Bob the Slob Hansen (give it up DBNS is dead) and a host of others including fire control troops. Oh yeah and some guy named Vanover too! Well they finally closed Blytheville then called Eaker, another excuse for a party!! Moved on to KI Sawyer from 1992-1994 when they closed it, see a trend here yet? KI was great, if you like snow! The down side was we had just become a part of TAC ooops that's ACC and part of operations and for some reason Bomb nav troops were supposed to become crew chiefs, 2 things that don't set with me too well. I will contend always if I wanted to become a crew chief or Comm Nav for that matter, I would have joined the Air Force as one. Anyway the flightline pissed me off, I got tired of sending the young kids to wash airplanes and do crew chief stuff, so i went to MOC (job control for you old timers) was a good place to piss large amounts of people off at once.... I liked that and was good at it! After KI shut down, moved to Minot AFB, dodge the Barksdale bullet once again and better yet the B1 and B2 bullets. Did several things here in Minot, none of which included any Bomb Nav.... my "disruptive influence" has now proceeded me well LOL. There are more Bomb Navers here farmed out to various jobs than work the flightline!! Finished up my career running support section, what fun that is, I view support as a holding ground for losers they are going to kick out! No not really but almost! Now I suppose I need to go find a real job and have a few things going right now but don't want to jinx myself so I will withhold that info for now. I thank all that I have come into contact with in this great career field (even you comm-nav losers). A few of my favorites as I depart: To Ed Able my favorite MSET inspector 3 times was enough thank for the memories (aka headaches) and being the bestest asshole in the world. To Bill McGimpsey ear drops in your eyes? Oh well another task with my favorite MSET inspector. John Gowetski... where the hell are you?? Bob Hansen sorry didn't mean to put your bird in the freezer. Jerry Osborn, thanks for the guidance and wisdom to keep me going and stay in. David "slim" Whitman... where were those stops signs you ran over? An Jon thanks for the flashbacks with the names and places on this board LOL. Drop me a line if you care too. Brian aka Pbrain (thanks Goobernowski aka Gowetski)
Brian Richard <brichard@srt.com>
Minot, ND USA -
Northern Bases, I thought that was all SAC had, in the middle of no-where land in God's boondocks. It got so damned cold in Loring that SAC had to issue special thermometers that wouldn't freeze and could go past 40 below. Cold? try Thule in December when the sun never shines and the temp never registers on the thermometer. Hell the geese couldn't fly south until we de-iced them for takeoff. The only reason we had refrigerators was to keep the COLD out of the food and the beer warm enough to drink. Each 47 had 5 BT-400s running 24/7 and each and every truck had a BT-400 on the pintle hook to make it bearable. Piss on the MA-3s give me a BT-400 any day.
jack frost <JF@aol.com>
USA -
Just had to add this. 1960 during the ORI. The Red Ball Truck driver was CWO-4 Luther Dotson. Called MSL for a RT Unit to fix a bird for take off. Told AE Controller we were on our way to pick it up. 40 mph on the ramp and the cops pulled along side and told Mr. D to pull over. He gestured to them to bug out until he got this G-- D--- airplane fixed. They left and didn't come back. Mr. D's wife broke the leash law on base and let her cat out. It was sitting on the front porch railing and the cops confiscated it. She called her husband. He called the Provost Marshal, a full bird, and the cops brought back the kitty, along with an apology. You don't screw with a CWO.
Fred J. Double <fpooderdoo@aol.com>
Bristolville, Oh USA -
Tom, we had parachute line cutters, the ones with the orange handles, sharpen to a point instead of a hook, mounted on the eye brow ? panel on each side.
Ed Jones <AMXJones@earthlink.net>
USA -
Just got done watching the "Wings" channel, Doomsday Mission, the History of SAC. OK. now this is for the old corp (pre-TA)B-47 guys. There were a couple of B-47 shown with what looked like small swept wing missile between the engine nacelles. What the heck were they?? Gotta tell ya about Glasgow in the winter. 60 below zero. We went on stand down when a turbine blade broke during start up. Could go only to the chow hall. So we ordered pizza from the NCO Club. When it got up to 40 below, some of the guys wanted to go up on the roof to sunbath. Glasgow in the summer. 120 degrees on the black tarmac. no wind and 16 hours of daylight. Chinook weather. 40 below zero and the wind blowing about 40mph, climbed into the airplane, took off our parkas, snow pants and bunny boots. Three hours later, we re-robed. climbed out of the craft and every body was in short sleeve shirts. the temp had climbed to 50-60 degrees. at least that's the way I tell it 40 years later. take care
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, WY USA -
Wow! Jon, great site. Brought back a lot of memories. I see from the gallery you found the two BUFF wrecks near the lakebed. Aren't those crash sites interesting? I really miss Edwards the people there and maintenance. I have moved on from maintenance to operations since getting my commission in 2001. Beginning in 2003 I'll be a 13B1K on the JSTARS... They better hope I don't fly with my Leather man! It was nice to see a few familiar names. Like Brian Burkhead, who will ever let me forget that I was training two airmen to change a FLIR with the TO still in the truck! hehe. Then of course I could never forget the time I was at Lowry for 5 level school with Jon, Bob "The Slob", Dave, Kevin, Mel? The mayo in bob's bowling ball, video taping tons of porno because you cant get it in OK, giving plasma for extra money, pencil shavings, and finally the padlock on my duffel bag. So many memories, so many names... So little space to write them all. Thanks!
Craig Osborne <c0sborne@comcast.net>
Tyndall AFB, FL USA!!!! -
Ed, that life raft incident at Ramey was one of the reasons all the Gs at Robins had an icepick mounted conveniently on the cockpit instrument panel.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
DCM/NCO Bachelor Bar - Our DCM was always looking for an invitation from a senior NCO for happy hour at the NCO Club's bachelor bar. It was the only way that he could drink in peace, as the NCOs paid him no undue attention. At the O Club he was under constant siege by Lieutenants bending his ear about something!
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Shop Moral Scale....We had a particularly humorous buck sergeant named Senn in our shop. Each morning he posted the SCSF (Senn's Calibrated Suck Factor) rating on the scheduling board scale ( 0-100). It kept everyone in the shop entertained as his mood, and the "suck factor" oscillated during the shift. Senn, you got a TA alignment at 10PM and an BBD check at 2AM....SCSF=98! Senn, take some comp time today....SCSF=3!
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
A maintenance-intensive A/C - While doing a stint as the AE Controller, I had taken delivery of a document instructing us that Robins was a designated emergency landing site for the SR-71, including a manual on how to handle the bird should that situation arise. I browsed and filed it. On a very quiet Sunday afternoon about a month later I was alone in Job Control...the Sr. and FMS Controllers were sitting by the phones and enjoying a ballgame in quarters. That's when the Command Post rang advising me that something called an SR-71/A-11/Y-12A was landing, and that I was supposed to know what to do with it. I'm to bring my knowledge (the manual) and myself out to meet the bird on the maintenance pad via the X-Ray vehicle(DCM's Ford wagon)...and to get on the radio to advise everyone. (They added that the base switchboard was swamped with UFO reports.) I did not want the CP to know that I was alone, and quickly rang the Sr. Controller, who said he'd be there in five. While I'm stalling the CP, the bird landed, popped a chute and stopped on the taxiway....the pilot demanding a sweeper in front of each engine intake before he could taxi...very delicate turbines to be that worried about FOD. The Sr. Controller arrived while I was going back and forth on the radios/phones confirming the need for sweepers, and I did not have to leave JC unmanned. We got the bird to the pad, but the crew hatches had to be opened with a special tool stowed under an access plate in the fuselage by someone outside the Blackbird. On this particular bird the hatches did not hinge, instead they had to be removed completely, after unscrewing four fasteners on each one. The crewmen were wearing full pressure suits and were unable to exit the cockpit without an assist from someone wearing wing-walkers giving them a lift under the armpits while straddling the fuselage. Someone asked the pilot what the problem was when he removed his helmet, and the response was that his windshield needed cleaning....none of our business. The A/C was towed to a hangar and backed in under the watchful eyes of the crew. No one was supposed to see the exhaust outlets or the rear of the A/C. By then the DCM and DWC had arrived. After adding some CDF troops to guard the plane, we just closed her up, and did the shortest crew debrief in history. The next day a 135 arrived from the west coast with 45 techs, special fuel, parts and inert gases. (Nitrogen in the gear oleos, not air.) These troops worked on the bird in shifts for 48 hours and finally got her launched for home. Talk about man-hours/flight being high on the Buff???
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
1967 - I was alone in the B/N shop around dinner time preparing for a TA alignment when a RN, a particularly bad-tempered Major, came storming in yelling about his "bad bomb"(not his first of late) and wanting to see the SOB who had signed-off on the GD piece-of-s**t bomb computer and radar that was to blame for all his woes. He was stomping around totally out of control to the point that I wondered how he was staying certified under AFR 35-1. This is all being directed at me, and I'm just standing there waiting for him to wind down. I'm wondering why this guy ain't at debriefing, and where our debriefer and my alignment partner, Jim Bennett, has gotten to. Apparently the Major had stomped out of debriefing and was being trailed by the AEMS first shirt, CMSgt Callan. Callan entered yelling louder than the RN, and specifically instructing him to "quit f**king with my troops" and get his ass out of the shop before he was physically kicked out. Callan was in this guy's face, like a pissed baseball manager on an umpire. As the RN retreated through the door before Callan's blast, Callan added that the Major would be explaining his behavior to his squadron commander and the deputy wing commander by morning. Thank you, Sar'nt Callan! CMSgt Callan started WWII as a 18 year-old gunner on a B-17 in the Philippines. He survived the Bataan Death March and was promoted to the highest enlisted rank by an act of Congress at the end of the war.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Another direct PJ Myatt quote....Morning standup briefing with DCM, crews, Wing Commander, AMS Commander etc. ...Discussing why we're having so many bad bombs and TA runs. "If your G..D..nm crews weren't f...king stupid, we wouldn't have a problem..........Pj was one of a kind and the BEST to work for. NO ONE screwed with BN. Learned a whole stack from him.
Bill <eirish1>
SAC, USA -
In reply to Jim, Alfie and Cecil...Another Gospel True story PJ. Myatt was the "supreme" chief of the 22nd AMS, March air plane patch. Also a super sharp BN troop who took zero "shit" from anyone and who fix birds faster than most. Anyhow, we're do for an Air Force I.G. inspection and PJ always ran a spic and span place, so no one is excited. We sort of dusted around a little and made sure you could still see your image in the shop floor. So the "Bird" I.G arrives accompanied by the AMS Commander at the BN shop door, where PJ was standing. AMS commander says" Chief Myatt, this is Colonel so and so. PJ looks at him, looks at the Bird and says " Go get a fu..kin haircut and come back to see me."Gospel truth..I heard it, Quattlebaum, meacham and Redmond. The sucker got a haircut, came back and was the most courteous person in the world. Don't mess with BN Chiefs...right Jim?
Bill <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
hey skins,,,,,,,,,,,,,,would consider it an honor to do a ta align w/you do you remember project tape? we went thru that in the mid 60's before all the arc light deployments. we performed the asm-46 prealign, documented every thing they asked for. performed the a/c align and documented everything again. then we flew with the a/c and ran cal's against both flat terrain and peaks. we did this on a number of different a/c's once again documenting everything. never knew the results due to arc lite deployments, ta went out the window. like you I've gone thru a few but don't remember how short the time was. but it was quick. remember installing a computer and cranking the bias pot 3 turns ccw and the tilt pot 5 turns ccw. the a/c flew w/50' of bias error. one more turn would have done it. I'm about 4 hours away from Barksdale maybe we could talk them into letting us do a few if they still use it. i can still remember the synchro numbers for boresighting but anything that happened last week is a toss-up. keep the faith alfie
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Tom Kunich, Medals for TA Alignments. I guess I was entitled to a few. Most of us have lived most of these stories at sometimes, from the Red Balls to the TDY's I did time in Homestead and Kinchloe so I worked the extremes. I'll take the cold over the heat and humidity anytime. . You could always "fudge" with out the air conditioner for the systems in the North but not in the South. Nothing kept your feet warmer than bunny boots. As far as the 4 hour TA Alignment. Done them in less by myself and that is fact. Any folks out here that ever worked with me in Seymour, Kinch or Mather should remember it. Haven't done a TA Align. in over 20 years, but I know I could do one today if I had to. So to those wondering how you "tap" the antenna and adjust the phase shifter with just one person. Build some long leads and drag the O'scope out the hatch or in the wine cellar. The TA alignment did one thing. It married all the variables to solve one math problem. So who remembers what Profile Delta Theta resolves to? Even flew with the O'scope and layed in the wine cellar and monitored signals just to see the resolution of the problem during airborne missions. No fiction here Bill, all facts (as I recall tehm).
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
Clayton, NC USA -
don't knock the pocket rocket guys eirish,,,,,,,seems cecil hinson got chewed by the lgma for going to seymour johnson so he could pre-arrange for his re-assignment the guy had just gotten back from a tdy from biloxi doing the same thing for himself. anyone who knew cecil knew the truth. he was straight arrow all the way. i guess the col was throwing his conscience out the window. seems CMsgt charles o'toole who was the gam weenie in the office, took more umbrage than cecil did. he calmly went to the "inner sanctum" and proceeded to state his feelings to the col. as god is my witness the least offensive thing he said was to threaten to throw this guy out of the window. on completion he saluted did an about face and went back to his desk. charlie confessed to me during one of our many "2 hour lunches" he had bought into a small island somewhere in the bahamas or ???.... hope he's still there and living the good life.
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
the bait has been taken eirish first workday at SAC, my boss LtCol frank parella tells me that there's a buf on the tarmac having just done an emergency landing due to a fire in the lower compartment. cecil hinson was tdy so i got the job to find out what the haps were. not having seen a buf in 4 years i welcomed the opportunity. had to walk to the a/c as no red ball trucks were around. on arrival i meet the base commander, a real sphincter, who starts screaming at me to find out whats wrong so he can get this damn thing off his ramp before it cracks his concrete. lucky i had my flt lunch can opener on my key case. popped the zdeus fasteners to the overhead cb panel. big mess of blackened wires. very little insulation. seems the evs mod group had managed to pass a 6" dia bundle of wires thru the largest adel clamp i had ever seen. the clamp shorted to one of the circuit breakers. sierra hotel....hire all that unskilled labor off the street and save that money. long story short i reported my findings to col propeller and i'm sure a maintenance bulletin was issued to inspect the a/c already out of mod. when i returned to the office i was introduced to the deputy lgma who told me he didn't like -111 people and if i pissed him off he would send me down to mset. welcome to sac.
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Looking for someone that served in FMS engine shop and worked flight line at Blytheveille AFB from 66 thru 69. Remember Sgt Shorts, Sgt Masey, Sgt Overlander, Sgt Swarts, Sgt Mullins. E-mail me if you worked flight line during this time. Jerry Smith
Jerry Smith <jandlsmith@iocc.com>
Nashville, Ar USA -
I was fortunate enough to fly on the fist Ta flight out of Loring.I happened to attend the Sat. mission briefing for the Monday flight,and while there, Col. Kaplan Chief of Stand. Board and A/C commander was asking me questions, since it had months since some training at Castle.I mentioned that we had the TA mockup in the B/N shop. So Sunday afternoon was spent playing on it.While there, he asked how I'd like to go flying Monday. I agreed and we had a remarkably good flight.Best of all, we had 2 trained ACR alignment teams and this system and this system had been aligned by them. Oddly enogh, one of the ACR alignment team worked parttime as bartender at the officers club. After the flight, one of the crewmembers was tipping a couple and was asked by him how the mission went. The crewmember asked him why he wanted to know and he said "because I did te ACR alignment on that A/C'.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, cA USA -
SAC Street Smarts: I remember the first A/C that cycled through the depot for the TA mod that arrived at Loring AFB.It was from another base as you seldom got your own A/C back. To shorten the story we ended up replacing about 17 units that we found bad.The depot crew.really didn't use the system and the depot was not required to check out the system.It was obvious that the oringinating base had stuck in every bad unit they had, knowing the A/C would not return. It solved their supply problems but about wiped us out. Why were northern bases always undermanned and southern bases always overmanned? I remember messages from SAC Hdqtrs. requesting that we send our "most highly qualified" 7 levels for B-58 training. Sure we did! Rumors about minor problems being placed on A/C systems that would show up on preflight so a miraculous fix could be made, a late takeoff averted and maybe a letter of commendation that would help promotions? Nah, couldn't be true.
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, Ca USA -
lost Buf Ramey, PR 1968 ? life raft under pilots seat inflated after water burn off went in to water, RN NAV & GUNER got out. Buf hit egale at 29,000 over east coast same year ron'ed in Georgia 3 days til pick up. watched Buf crash Wright Pat early 70's, lost all tail control, made it to runway, broke off crew compartment on impact, rest of acft fliped and burned, crew got out ok. lost friends during nam, had heart bipass, lost a lot of memiories. still cant' spell. Ed
Ed Jones <AMXJones@earthlink.net>
USA -
In the interest of truth in war stories: How large were they? The SAC installation at Robins was surrounded on three sides by a true swamp. The mosquitoes were so large that POL once fed 500 gallons of JP4 to one before they discovered that it was not a transient A/C. The alligators weren't that large, but they were attracted to the warmth of the alert pad at night. And many a class "A" fuel leak resulted from ricochets when nervous CDF troops fired on a "saboteur" crawling along under a wing inside the red line.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Response for Ron Larson: I got to Robins in '67, but the story about sending the Loring bird home with a 465th "Black Knight" shield on both sides of the nose was still in circulation as gospel.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Respect is due the hardchargers who braved the weather of the Dakotas. However, they should imagine what it was like in a South Georgia July at 98/98 in the shade and 120-140 on the pad. I admit we always had the consolation of being able to whipup some bacon & eggs on the inboard canard of an AGM-28. However, this did not compensate for the fact that we had to settle for Bob White, while the Dakota boys hogged all the good pheasant and prairie chicken shooting.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
GROUND RULES FOR WAR STORIES..........................Story must be plausible and believable to a 321 after 4 hours in the club.Story must contain at least 1 bit of factual information. Embellishment of the "facts" is encouraged but use common sense(if available). No fair picking on the other "weenies" of A&E or AMS, especially the gun plumbers and dorks of comm/nav. ECM, AP, Camera and Doppler are wide open for comment though. Too, don't disparage AMMS as most of them were BN troops who couldn't hack the course and opted for the easy life. You might try a comment or two for the "white smock" puritans of PMEL but I'd bet they wouldn't understand. AS for the folks who served in LGMA..be considerate of your elders and respect them for the sense to work 9-5, in a warm/air-conditioned environment with 2 hour lunch breaks. If your entire career was served in the tropical south, remember the true BN troops who fought the wars in snow, sleet and 40 below weather 12 months a year(Grand Forks) Write on and keep me in humor!!
eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
REMEMBERING: The "heady" days of Airborne Alert(Hard Hat/Chrome Dome)...14-hours up around Thule. "Positive Control" points(ne Fail-Safe Points). Spare "spares" for your in-flight tool bag...another AS-15(or was it an AE-15?), some cards for the TA Computer. "Crew Fatigue" and the hammock strung behind the IP seat. The luxurious comfort of the IN seat. "Altitude Sickness" & "low-cabin pressure". Going to DEFCON III during the Middle East War. Iron Bombs down Brownsville way. ADM-20 penetration testing against the ADC at Tyndall. Buffs running the "Oil Burner" route at 500'...sometimes 300'through the Alabama flatlands on a clear day. The "Buff Bounce" at low-level. Fried chicken and ham & cheese box lunches. Everybody "hugging" the piss can. "Bombing" at the Statesville range. Bird strikes putting holes in ol'Buff. The thought of "exiting the A/C" through a hole left by the Nav's ejection seat. S-1 and S-2 alerts while the Squids ran the Russkie missle boats away from the coast. The sound of JP4 running through the exposed 8" Pipe in the upper deck ceiling during in-flight refueling. Being told to grab your Dispersal Bag when the Pueblo got nabbed. That wonderful Alaskan King Crab that came back from "Deep Freeze" in return for the fresh bread we had sent along on the 135s.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
A2C John Waers was a pretty good tech. However, he was the apple of the shop commander CMSgt Jim Scott's eye and that irritated me to no end. John himself was getting into the normal amount of trouble but somehow he would always slip away untouched by it and if I so much as sneezed at the wrong time I'd catch hell. Needless to say, there was a little competition between us. The usual suspects assigned to the TA's were SSgt Hembree or TSgt Harbin and sometimes both and we A2C's would have to stand around with our hands in our pockets for hours on end. Finally they started assigning John and I to TA's and we were spinning those things out so fast that TA time started falling like a B58 with an engine failure. The first TA's took 18 hours. I remember that distinctly because the rated calibration life of the TA computer at that time was 16 hours. We'd usually have to replace the TA computer at least once during an alignment and sometimes twice. Our experts (Hembree and Harbin) were the thorough sorts who would recite the check list item by item and check each item over and over. It would drive John and me crazy since we'd both memorized the checklist backwards and forwards. Finally guys like A1C Norm Pryor would be assigned to the TA and he knew that if John or I were on the TA he'd just sit aside and follow it in the checklist to make sure everything was done correctly. Then eventually they started giving TA's to either John or I and our lower seniority A2C's. I did a TA in 12 hours and then John did one in 10. I did one in 8 hours and John did one in 6 hours. That was such an achievement that Sgt Scott put John in for a commendation and he received a letter of commendation from the wing commander. Well, I wanted one of those so I got the best guys and went out on another TA. This time everything went perfectly smooth and in 4 hours I rolled out of the hatch high as a kite and pretty happy that we'd not only beat the record but probably set it to a point that couldn't be beaten by more than minutes. Outside there was this Bird Colonel and he sort of said something like, "How long is this going to take?" Since I was high from the effort I said, "Why we just pencil whipped this thing out in 4 hours!" with a grin on my face. He disappeared and I finished the paperwork, gathered the team and the equipment and we drove back to the shop. There was a real quiet group there when we arrived laughing and joking and Scott asked me to hang around for awhile even though it was the end of the shift. Harbin and Hembree disappeared on a TA and I was put to the usual cleaning up the shop. Finally Harbin and Hembree turned up again and showed Scott a clearance plane sheet and Scott relaxed. It turns out that whoever that Colonel was, I insulted him with my glib comeback and he reported me to the wing commander who, having JUST signed a commendation for a 6 hour TA didn't believe that I could have done one in 4 hours. Luckily we never cheated on anything that might endanger the flight crews. No matter what happened to anything else that ALWAYS took presidence with me. And instead of a letter of commendation I barely missed a court martial. That damned Waers beat me again!
Tom Kunich <cyclintom@yahoo.com>
San Leandro, CA USA -
ORI LAUNCH AND NO RADAR...I had the honor of serving with surely one of the most "colorful" B/N troops in history of the AFSC. This particular TSgt was a pioneer on the "K" system, and along with a couple of less "colorful" Techs was a mainstay of our shop. In short, he knew his stuff, he taught it to others and he was always fun to work with. He also never backed down when he was right. We were in the middle of an ORI launch, and I was standing by on the alert pad in the van with him when one of the RNs called in with a "no radar". The BUFF with the trouble was one of the last on the Tree, and I got the van moving post haste. My companion said he'd handle it, and disappeared through the hatch. Immediately after that the DCM pulled up in the X-Ray vehicle and he also entered the A/C. Within two minutes, my B/N partner exited the A/C and proceeded to sit down cross-legged directly under the hatch. All engines were running and all I could do was motion to him. He waved me off, and I saw that he was shouting something to someone just inside the A/C. The DCM then exited the A/C and left in the X-Ray vehicle. While this was going on, my partner re-entered the A/C and within 60 seconds I heard the RN on the radio reporting that his radar was "go". My guy returned to the van and our alert birds all got off in good time. Afterward the Tech explained that while he was corecting a simple problem, the DCM kept asking him what was going on. So he just left. The DCM was the one shouting to him from the hatch, wanting to know what he was doing. He told the DCM that he could fix the problem in a few seconds, but not while talking to him at the same time. The DCM told the Tech that he was right and left. We had a good DCM.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
I was on duty in the B/N shop one evening at Robins AFB back in '67, when the phones from Job Control and Command Post started ringing off the hooks. All radio and television reception in the Warner Robins, GA area was either competely out or full of static and strange interference. Base communications was suffering as well. It was thought(rightly so) that the source was electronic radiation from one of our A/C, and we were to find and stop it ASAP. I knew it wasn't Bomb/Nav radiating with a main radar because there were only two of us on duty, and we were both in the shop. Job Control said they showed ECM at one of the A/C on the pad, and no one was answering the phone at the ECM shop. I hopped in the van and headed out to the A/C where they were supposed to be working. I had some second thoughts about approaching the A/C if they were radiating, because I had plans to start a family one day. (Remember holding the flourescent tube in front of the main radar antenna when it was radiating? And those ECM boys could put out some wattage!) There was no one outside the A/C, but the GPU was running full bore, so I sucked it up and pushed on through the hatch as rapidly as possible. When I got up the ladder to the top deck, I found two brand new ECM guys just radiating away with several systems. Both of them were so new that switching to the dummy loads had been totally overlooked in their enthusiasm to play with the new toys. They quickly shut down all systems, and sure enough Warner Robins got back to primetime television programming along with uninterupted music from the popular radio stations....not to mention base communications. But truly it had been the night that TV, not the lights, went out in Georgia! It continues to amaze me that those systems were capable of creating such electronic havoc over such a wide area while the A/C was on the ground. (I apparently escaped without frying any delicate tissues because my kids and grandkids are just fine....but I was worried there for awhile.)
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Another war story, to inspire Jim,Alfie,Tom and Willy to write again. We're sitting across the pond, retrieving the reflex birds and cocking them to alert status. The WORD comes down from on high that a 47, of unknown nationality, is due in for a compass swing this afternoon. You WILL swing the compass and the bird WILL depart at 0530 hrs. The bird lands,is surrounded by APs, the crew gets out(I counted 5)and we begin debriefing the crew. Home Wing...nothing..Tail number...nothing, writeups...nothing Swing the compass, don't ask questions and we were never here. For all you old farts..remember the super"MC-1" in place of the rose? So we lug the big mother out to the north line to install a "pre swung valve". Only problem is they wouldn't let us in to the airplane to do the job.From on high, the Nav shows up to "escort us into the bird, plus a retinue of commanders, DCM and birds. Amidst all the bullshit, the MC-1 decided to crap out leaving us the option of the rose or tweaking to the N-1 compass.The crew arrives for pre takeoff and states" you got 45 minutes"... so I grabbed the ladder, the one that hung off the vertical stabilizer by 1 leg and commenced tweaking the BNS to AP. In the mean time the crew started all six for an on-time departure. Ever hung on the tail with all six running? Me and my speed wrench worked miracles on the last screws and I doubt if they were all in. BUT...the compass was good and the unknown bird made a successful mission. I can only guess where? As for us, BombNav always accomplishes the impossible. We missed chow but the bird flew and someone said thanks. Can you think of another AFSC that ALWAYS accomplished the impossible?AMMS was close!
eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
SAC, USA -
To any 98th A&E (AMS) troops of the '54 to '58 era: Charlie Schleininger has been hospitalized with cancer. It spread from his body to his brain. Doesn't look good. If you wish to contact him, let me know and I'll get his E-mail address to you. If you can't do that, please at least keep him in your thoughts. Charlie was definitely one of the good guys. Thanks....
Gene <Gene@AStreet.com>
Los Gatos, CA USA -
Saw Eirish's comments about the B-47's that never existed and that reminded me. We returned from TDY Anderson AFB, Guam, on December 30, 1966 after the Bob Hope Show. He and Phyllis Diller were pretty good. You'd think that I'd remember the token babe but I don't. We arrived at Tachikowa, Japan, early in the morning of the 31th with a set of radios that wouldn't reach the end of the runway. We were due for Nome so we couldn't fly without radios. I helped the Com/Nav guy work on the radios but we came to the conclusion that there was trouble with the radio wiring in the Starlifter. There was another C141 Starlifter there with a load of Green Berets headed for VietNam. A quick negotiation with the AC of that flight and all of those Green Berets were forced to stay in Japan over new years and until they could get parts in to fix the Starlifter while we stole theirs. While walking over to look over the new Starlifter I noticed some hangers with guards on them. One of them was partially open and through the doors I could see another of those B-47's that never existed. The bomb-bays were open and you could see lenses sticking out. We left Japan the afternoon of December 31, 1966, arrived in Nome on December 30, 1966, took off after refueling (18" of ice on runway) and landed in March AFB, Riverside, CA, early morning of December 31, 1966. Checked in, went on leave and arrived home in the San Francisco Bay area in time to celebrate New Year's Eve.
Tom Kunich <cyclintom@yahoo.com>
San Leandro, CA USA -
Anyone have any information or news on the following B/N troops from Robins AFB 1968: Bennett, Vargas, York, Patrick?
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Anyone remember any of these incidents at Robins AFB(465th/19th BW) '67-'68? #1 - In the fall of '67 at Robins AFB, I did the Bomb/Nav portion on a simulated AGM-28B launch from the RN position during which the #1 Hound Dog was in fact released from the pylon. This happened around 10PM on the maintenance pad. It was hushed-up very quickly, and one AMMS troop who was stationed at Robins at the time has told me recently that he doesn't recall it happening. Of course it did...I was there. He only remembered a forward collet failure. # 2 - Also in late '67, we were doing a bomb door test on one of the Gs. When I hit the manual BBD button both doors were twisted badly because the rear hydraulic pack failed. The hydraulics shop troop had reported all actuators disconnected when the checklist was read....he just hadn't bothered to really do it. We nearly had to pull the crew chief off of the guy for "bending" his bird. #3 - What about the Sunday afternoon in early 1968 when the SR-71(ne Y-12A/A-11)declared an inflight emergency and landed at Robins creating a flood of UFO calls to the base switchboard. I was on duty in Job Control as the AEMS Controler that afternoon and was in charge of the manual telling us what had to be done in the event of such a landing.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Drove through Lowry on a business trip 3-4 years ago. Entered through the old gate off East Colfax and I stood on the slab of the old Bomb/Nav school building. The entire base was nothing but a field of slabs....no buildings left standing. A couple of years prior to that I had made the same drive. At that time the buildings were still standing...just boarded-up and deserted.
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Went through Bomb/Nav school at Lowry '64-'65. Did an instructor tour at the school immediately after finishing, as did three of the four guys in my class*. '67-'68 with 465th/19th BW, Robins AFB, GA. (*Earl Day, Tom Drygas, Denny Berg & myself)
Tom Sanford <thomas.r.sanford@gte.net>
Nashville, TN USA -
Would like to contact Kenny Green stationed at Glasgow AFB during the 60's. Kenny was the best radar tech we had back in the APS-64 days. I may be taking a trip to NY city. Would like to visit. As a side note, remember the MITO the 91st, 92nd and the two tanker wings participated in (I believe August) 1964 out of Fairchild AFB. Musta been 40 planes involved. Man, that was something to see!! There were airplanes all over the sky.
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, Wy USA -
more names have surfaced in my mind jim lineberger, hans dritchler, john dean, ray palmer, ray williams, al jankowiak, pat booth, dave lambden, bobby crist, g.w. harris, ralph sheets, lloyd mozingo, robert miller, bruce (bluce) strandberg, charles hughes, willie roberge john hebert (a-bear), jim stafford (peaches) james hicks, gary cockerham, ed smith, harry olden and the guy who influenced me the most don genton........
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Hi everyone, I an ex Bomb/Nav Systems Tech (32150L) from 1970-1974. After basic, spent 10 months at Lowry, then off to Dyess, then TDY to Guam (Feb 72 - Jun 72), then PCS to Utapoa Jul 72 to Jul 73, then finally back to Lowry unitl I was discharged in Apr 74.
Larry Bell <lawrence_t_bell@hotmail.com>
Springboro, Oh USA -
The number of Spams in the guest book is really starting to get to me.... I will be switching the web site to a free membership system very soon.  The registration information will allow me to hopefully keep out the spammers as I will have to have a confirmed E-mail address for everyone wishing to have access to bombnav.org. 

Jon


Need info on the B-66 Destroyerr
David barnett <Barnettdm@aol.com>
Richmond, VA USA -
SPAM REMOVED
All you former 9th bomb Wing (B-47) sparkchasers the reunion next year will be October 11-12 in coeur D' Alane Idaho. Contact former 99th Nav Denis Knepper at denisfk@earthlink.net or (208)665-9908. Ron Turner and Ran Gemmell I e mailed you but they both came back undeliverable. Could it be a short between the head sets?
Tony Ascanio <tobarasmsn.com>
Bothell, Wa USA -
any fellow B-52 Navs or aircrew from wright pat (1966) still around?
Milt Spivack <m.spivack@verizon.net>
USA -
Hey you Bomb/Nav troops. Remember this? Nosepicker Redball Phase Dock PSM-6 BB stackers hammerhead line badge FUBAR Beer Can TOPOCOMP wine celler dash 60 hog night slosh night ORI chrome dome Busy owl bombcomp TA alignment SAC SUX prop wash zeus fastner why not minot? compass row b4 stand CND code 169 alert pad Bread truck red x Lowery 1977 to 1978 32150K ellsworth on to Warner Robins 19th AMS 1978 to 1981. Job control in 1979. flight line and shop. Now work for the FAA in Atlanta as an inspector. I miss the beer, the partys and the smell of the plane and the great people that I proudly served with. I wish I could go back just one time and win bombcomp, do an ORI and get hammered at the NCO club on Old Mil. Just one more time. GOD BLESS BOMB/NAV AND THE AIR FORCE
JJ(Johnny Johnson) <planetj7@bellsouth.net>
Dallas, GA USA -
Looking for men who served Crash Fire & Resque, Carswell AFB, Fort Worth, TX in 1949-1951. Corporal Marcoe, discharged Feb. 2, 1951. Looking up old buddies.
Robert J. Marcoe <marcoe@mari.net>
Menominee, MI USA -
Talked to a couple of old Bomb/Nav guys and they're looking for some other guys: Anyone know what happened to some guy called "Wally" Wallace? Loebner? David Appleford? Terry Fiedler?
Tom Kunich <cyclintom@yahoo.com>
San Leandro, CA USA -
I am trying to find a SAC Bomb Comp Patch from 1969. I was the Crew Chief, stationed at Beale AFB Cal. We took First in Navigation, have a beautiful ring and trophy as a memory, but would love the patch. Any assistance would be appreciated. Thanks, Neil
Neil Bonner <nbonner100@aol.com>
Bridgeton, mo USA -
I am searching for any one that was at Lowry Air Base Denver CO around 1952 that could give me some info about an instructor that was there at that time. His name is Leon L. Thompson. He is my father. I have never met him, so any info about him would be VERY helpful. Thanks Joe
Joseph E. Thompson <jumper1952@hotmail.com>
USA -
I have obtained a MD-1 astrotracker from a surplus company in Ft. Worth. For some time I have been looking for a piece of the airplane (B-52, any model) suitable for use as an urn for my ashes when I pass (hopefully not for a while) and this item looked like it would be suitable. I intend to separate the top from the bottom to be sure there is enough room inside for my ashes with the other parts of the astrotracker, but it is not obvious to me how it comes apart and there is a depot inspection tag which cautions that there is 33HG pressure inside, presumably dry nitrogen. Can any former or present bomb-nav troop tell me if these were worked on locally or if they were just sent on to depot? And if they were worked on, how does it come apart? See this link for a photo. http://www.omahas.com/Html/Images/AV411lg.jpg Thanks. Peter J. Seberger, Maj. USAF Ret.
Peter Seberger <sebergerfarm@alltel.net>
Cozad, NE USA -
Went from Lackland to Lowry for school. Assigned to the 362nd A & E at Larson AFB, Moses Lake, WA. Eventually the wing moved to March AFB in Riverside, CA. with me along with them. I remember James C. Scott, James E. Scott, Tola Harris, a whole load of Robert Millers, James Harbin, Bill Hembree, Willy (the periscope fell off) Purdue, Howard(?) McNitt, Jim J. Jones, Mike Hachett, Jeff Dill, Dille, Howard Kitchens (probably one of the biggest influences in my life), N. Jack Pryor, some giant on Guam by the name of Jungeman who was the nicest guy I ever met, and so many people who made me proud to be an American that I can't count them all. I've been pretty successful in my life and I owe a great deal to the influences that I had in my four years in the service -- in SAC and Bomb/Nav in particular. Thanks guys.
Tom Kunich <cyclintom@yahoo.com>
San Leandro, CA USA -
Bill E. Been many weeks since I last looked at the site. Mike Pettigrew was at Loring with me, around '70-'72, I sponsored him. He then moved on to Barksdale and did a couple of TDYs to Guam during "Nam". Left USAF after having enough of the TDY stuff and went to work for IBM. Great job and they sponsored much of his schooling. Anyone remember Tim Herrel (sp?)? Art Plante in Loring? Cheers all.
Bill Farris <dipnet@gis.net>
Chatham, MA USA -
Hi Ed Jones here, 32170K & G, 65-Lowry, 66-Grand Forks, 67-68 Ramey PR, late 68-Loring, 69-Little Rock B58 Sch, 69-70 Grissom, 70-75 Wright Patterson, 76 Barksdale, Lived in wine celler TA alignments first year at GF, TA alignments & underwings put on 40 lbs lifting Madrecs mod's & RT's at Ramey, less than 4 months at Loring orders to B58's, ended up in Job at Grissom till phaseout, flight line & Job at Wright Pat, Job at Barksdale, Many TDY's every where, got tired, got out. joined Army National Guard, went Active Guard & Reserve, retired active duty Army 1989.
Ed Jones <amxjones@earthlink.net>
Warrensburg, MO USA -
Hello from the old grey haired Bomb/Nav 9th A&E Airman, all you APS-23/KA-4, APS-64/MA-7 troops the B-47 Stratojet Association convention will be held here in the Seattle area next month, check out the revamped and simplified site B-47.com for info. 51-7066 a "B" model upgraded to an "E" and later a WB-47 from the 384th Bomb Squadron is at the Museum of Flight at the South end of King County Airport (Boeing Field). I think it was based at Little Rock,Ark. Anyone know of her? She is still a beautiful bird!
Tony Ascanio <tobaras@msn>
Bothell, Wa USA -
CHECK THIS OUT........This Sunday, August 18th on the History channel.."The B-52 story 9 PM eastern time. For you AMMS types that means "Mickey's little hand is on the 9 and his big hand is on the 12.For you Bomb Nav guys it's beer time and for you Comm guys sit back and have a coke.
Eirish
USA -
Great web site. I was an R/N on H models in Grand Forks from 1974 until I got out in 1978. I had one short TDY in D models in 1975. As years go by I tend to forget the bad things about my years in the Air Force and the good things get even better. One regret is that we "crew dogs" either didn't get to or didn't think to get to know our ground support people better. I have done some cooresponding with some former crew chiefs from GFAFB but other than that I guess I will have to be content to get to know the rest of you via this web site. Thanks for the refreshed memories. I will try to dig out some old photos to share.
Dick Larson <dick_larson@bobcat.com>
Lisbon, ND USA -
Hello: To all of the first wave (54-58)of 98th A&E Bomb/Nav troops: Charlie Schleininger is hurtin' and I'm sure he'd like to hear from you. Contact me through this address and I'll pass his address on to you. We've lost a few over the years: "Moose" Deveraux passed from a heart attack several years ago. Darryl Crossno just passed last year. Frank Funicello passed two years ago. However, there are a group of us still around. Contact me to get to Dean Goff for his Alumni listing. I was in Tucson, at the 98th BW reunion, in October and saw B/N people from all of the "eras". There was Bob Beem, Jack Meteyer, Charlie Schleininger, Bob Garcia, Orville Evans and a couple more I just can't remember. This year's reunion is at Dayton, and next year at Riverside. You can get more info at http://members.aol.com/bombgrp98/ So, it's not all doom and gloom. They were good guys that did a great, but tough,job. Remember SAC and the guys that aren't here to read this, everytime you think of b. clinton saying he "loathed the military". Remember SAC everytime one of these fluffy types says that you can't "prepare for peace and war simultaneously". We did. We won. We were a different era and did our job. The new guys are just as dedicated, and I respect them fully. Thanks...
Gene <Gene@AStreet.com>
Los Gatos, CA USA -

Denver 81-82, Griffiss,82-94, Edwards 94-98, Always on the flightline. Call the AFSC whatever you want I'm a BOMB/NAV troop. Worked Q-38 and OAS IOC at Griffiss. Finishing up at Maxwell working in PME. Yes, I said PME, would you belive there have been 3 Bomb/Nav troops working on PME program since I got here in 98. Plus we got a couple of Buff crew chiefs. Does anybody have nose art from Griffiss (Victorious Secret). I know the DCM took all the samples when they made us paint them over.
brian burkhead <bburkhead@netzero.net>
millbrook, AL USA -
Hello: I was in Bomb/Nav at Lincoln AFB, 98th A&E, from 54-65. Those were interesting times. Later went to Beale, Kincheloe, Griffiss with several small stops in between. Dean Goff has been trying to contact former 98th A&E troops for inclusion into the alumni Association and reunions. I tried to contact B. DeHaan from the informtion page, but it came back. What's your new E-mail address? To all who served, thanks. To all who wanted to but couldn't, thanks. To all who supported us, regardless of your own situation, thanks.
Gene C. <Gene@AStreet.com>
Los Gatos, CA USA -
Nah, Larson was just an IBM Tech. Rep.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
More name flashbacks: Jim Helman, Terry Ganzel, Daryl Armer, Jim Bennett, O.P. Malone, Ted Patterson, Linda Hicks, to be continued...
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
Clayton, NC USA -
WOW!!!! Larson sounds like h'e still working the Bomb/Nav system. Sounds like one those shop troops to me.
Frank Hunt <frankohunt@hotmail.com>
Charleston, SC USA -
Old Q-38 tricks of the trade.At Walker AFB in 1958, to minimize radar Tx problems (maggie arcing), we installed 3 phase variacs on the input to the modulator, controlable at the RN station.To help flight line radar maint. or pre-flight, we removed the interference generator (for signal to noise ratio checks-never worked) and installed a dummy load switchable from the RN station so we could transmit almost anyplace. Anyone remember metal chips in the Azimuth Resolver causing intermittent sweep loss on the displays? At Griffiss AFB (1960) installed the mockup radar antenna up on the roof so we could radiate and get real radar images in the shop.Also modified some video amplifier cans (hacksawed them open) by running the video throught a variable time constant circuit, adjusted by the Rn. this gave us sharper radar images on low level runs across mountainous terrain. i think the "K" system had this. At Loring AFB, early 60s (during the winter) before starting a TA alignment out side, we would "marry a RT unit and the TA computer in the shop and install both in the A/C and then do the alighnment. It greatly reduced our time in the great outdoors. We had our fun in the early days too.
Ronald Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
Any of you people remember Captain Jack Hammer from the days of Eniwetok? He was an AC of a B-36 there and received a "Well Done". Thanks,
Kendall Kennedy <Kray726@aol.com>
Phoenix, AZ USA -
Hi fellow comrades.I would like to add some more names to the list of guys, That served, with me in the 42nd ADS, at Dyess AFB, Abilene Texas,Mar. 1957-Feb. 1960.Sam Chechourka,Jerry O. Jones,James Robertson,Daniel Rowe,Marion O. Stamey,Jerry Mesker, Thomas Esposito, Dave Warner,Leon F. Hunt,Robert N. Thompson,Harold Reynolds,(from Anthony, Kansas)Robert Stell, and anyone else, who served with me in the 42nd ADS, at Dyess.I would also like to locate a former Commander, of the 42nd, Major John T. Beal.If any of you guys has any newspaper clippings, or photos of the B47 Bomber that crashed in July, 1957, please e-mail me.If any of you fellows has any old orders in your file with Sgt. Wilcoxen's name and AFSN on it, such documents as training, please e-mail me, I really need to contact him. I was on the flight line that day when we had an alert, and the JATO exploded, on take off, on the 3rd bomber.I saw the flight crew eject, at about 1500 feet altitude, but the enlisted man, never made it out.This was a very tragic incident,and one of our buddies lost his life.Any information on any of these subjects will be appreciated. Sincerely, Edwin B. Kelly
Ebwin Bruce Kelly <ebkellyvet@yahoo.com>
Hamlet, N.C USA -
I was assigned to the 42nd ADS, Dyess, AFB, Abilene Texas,From March, 1957, until 3 Feb. 1960. My AFSC 46150, munition specialist.My crew chief, at time of discharge, was Sgt. Wilcoxen, nick name 'Fuzz'. If anyone has any information on Sgt. Wilcoxens whereabouts, please e-mail me, it is very important that I locate him.
Edwin B. Kelly <ebkellyvet@yahoo.com>
Hamlet, , N.C. USA -
DELETED
Hi, my email address changed. BNAV from 1960-1987, worked on the C,D,E,G and H Models. Been at ALTUS, SEYMOURJOHNSON,PEASE,GUAM,UTAPAO,WESTOVER,BARKSDALE, ROBINS, and Last GRAND FORKS>. Spent lot of time taking care of the dreaded rectangle box call MADREC. I've seen a lot of familar names on the Guestbook.
Donald Webster <dwebster8@cox.net>
Wichita, KS USA -
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Words that Bomb Nav Troops could do without!!!..................................................You've got "standby" this weekend........................... You've got PCS orders...Grand Forks North Dakota............ We have an "underwing" check at 0230 hrs.................... After a PCS....Your furniture is in the warehouse........... MSET is here!!!!............................................ SAC alert!!!................................................ It'll be a short TA alignment, only need to tweak it......... The RN after a few "bad bombs".. the scope was milky, the Xhairs jumped and the counters were erratic. Sounds like a CND ................................................... Pilot after an aborted LL entry... profile mode the trace was high, in HOR the trace was low...broken sweep! CND??? Commander to lowly BN troop...We've selected you to attend the NCO academy...translation..no one volunteered. After a COCO...248 has a loss of radar!!!.................... We need a Madrec on 172 for the AGm sortie( %AM)............ E models... we need to change the computer power supply..... Mickey Mouse needs help on the release cicuits.............. Doppler says the tilt info is bad........................... Any volunteers for North Africa???.......................... Who wants to go to Thule?................................... PCS to OSAN??? I'm SAC not AF Anderson? I just got back?.................................. You can't crosstrain...BN is frozen.........................
eirish1 <eirish1@attbi.com>
USA -
War story time: Anyone from Warner Robins remember, in the early 60s, a Loring AFB B-52 a/c being repainted with the W_R emblem? The DCM figured that we were regenerating too many of Loring's missions and maybe ought to get credit for them. Anybody from Walker AFB remember a B-52 shot down by an ANG fighter on a "practice intercept"? Was it Griffiss or Loring that lost 1st place Bomb Comp because their refueling KC-135 ground aborted? One of Loring AFB early 1960s ORIs was covered in Life magazine. Who remembers the last high altitude bomb runs consisting of abouut 8 90 degree turns,while dumping chaff and flares to prevent being tracked, creating a zig zag pattern with about 30 seconds of straight and level flight before release? Next came terrain avoidance?
Ron Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
Ron Larson's note reminded me of the Minimum Interval Take-off tests they ran at Altus AFB back around 1960. Six or so B-52s took off at 60 second intervals and you can believe the last three had a lot of trouble. I thought one of them was going down for sure, but he recovered at the last second.
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
I was an IBM tech rep on the Q-38 system and watched the first E models rolled out at Boeing Seattle and followed them to the 6th BW, Walker AFB.I was able to fly on the Combat Rediness Test where a total of 45 a/c were launched as we had 3 sqdns and over 50 a/c. My next assignment about 1960 was to Griffiss AFB as they received new G model a/c.I was assigned next to Loring AFB and was there during GAM-77 and Terrain Avoidance modifications. I was able to fly on the first lo-level mission out of there.Did some deer hunting up in the Allegash with Cecil Hinson, Bob Begly, Sparky Spangler, Tom Raeder(A&E Com) and others.Next assignment was Warner Robbins as they received the TA modifications.I found that flight line work was much easier when your warm and being on your support depot base didn't hurt either.Next was briefly at Barksdale and them to Wright Pat to work on system engineering improvements.Participated in "Jet Black" where Q-38/Gam-77 reliability were tested by actual launches.My nest assighment was Ramey AFB and I finished my Q-38 days at Plattsburgh AFB.Met lots of fine people at all locations!
Ronald Larson <Antiqueronkaz@webtv.net>
Newbury Park, CA USA -
Hi I am looking for people that was stationed at Tatalina Air Force Base, Alaska in 1971. And any one that knew Melvin Barnett. DeeDee Carlo
DeeDee Carlo <carlonelson@hotmail.com>
Galena, Ak USA -
Trinidad Herrera here. Joined up on Dec 27,1960. Lowery from January till September. I remember Airman Hall was our Sets instructor, can't remember the fundamental guys. Then to Glasgow AFB Montana to the 4141st Aerospace wing with Herk Parker, Gary Dougherty, and Roy Gibson. Sgt Beattie was head shed. Col. Bonitz was A&E commander. Al Brown was orderly room clerk and my room mate till he shipped to England. Can't spell my Lynns last name, my other non-B/N bud. Glasgow was built when the military brass decided to break up the super bases. The 322D Bomb squadron was one of the three originaly at Fairchild. Another squadron was shipped to Larson AFB. Lots of B/N guys went through Glasgow. We got most of the ex-B-47 guys from closed bases. Steve Grey,Dark Green, Sgt Laney, Cox,Frank Clark, J Others were Ken "light" Green, Gene Kidder,Bush, Terry Plourd, Sgt Chounier, many others. We spent 6 month at Fairchild while the runway was repaired. Good duty there. Went to Ellsworth to ASB-15 school, me and sgt Wright.Got out on Dec 7, 1964. College for acouple of years where my training in beer drinking came in handy. Back to the mines. The Sunrise Iron mine in Sunrise Wyoming. knocked around on survey crews, then to the Uranium Mines in Jeffrey City Wyoming where I worked at every job except hoist man. Eventualy was promoted to Ventalation Engineer then Radiation Safety officer which is what I do now. Went the Lowery in May. Saw the Wings over the Rockies Air & Space Museum. Lots of air planes, one B52B that was used as a recon plane. one big problem with this museum, there were NO mockups of the systems we train on. What the heck anyway. Oh, yea, Simko and crew arrived in Glasgow as I was leaving. and I will never forget my trainee George d. Young.
Trinidad Herrera <therrera@rmisp.com>
Lander, WY USA -
DELETED
Lowry '59-'60, then Wright-Patterson (4043rd when I arrived, later became 17th BW) till '63. Saw one name I remembered, Joe Gordy, for whom I worked for a while. Love to hear from any of the old crew.
George Mechem <mechemg@msn.com>
Lansing, MI USA -
hi, nice site, keep up the great work!
michael
United States -
There are only 2 models of B-52s flying today. 52-008, a B model that belongs to NASA at Edwards AFB and H models which belong to both Reserve and Active units at Barksdale, Minot and Edwards AFBs. All G models are in the bone yard or on display. None are flying due to start II. NASA has a new B-52H, 61-0025 which will replace the B model. I saw the B model flying today and it is weird seeing a tall tail model flying but it is a pretty thing, all silver and spewing thick black smoke as a buff should.
Jon
USA -
Checkout the AMMS site @ ...ammsalumni.com ..Neat site and you'll recognize a whole stack of people....That is, if you were one of the 321s who "humped" the flightline instead of "flying" a desk or "working?" the shop. Could we implement an "alumni list" Jon?
Eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
USA -
Lowry AFB, Bomb/NAV school fro 9/62 to 5/63. Turner AFB 5/63 to 7/66. Then 30 years with IBM working on almost every type of computer made, but still haven't seen anything to match what we had in the B52D's. I would really like to find an old Tracker, Bomber, Polor Converter. The people I work with in computers now, can't believe we did it all with a bunch of motors and gears.
William (Bill) Wynn <wlwynn@attbi.com>
Orange Park, FL USA -
Lowry AFB, Bomb/NAV school fro 9/62 to 5/63. Turner AFB 5/63 to 7/66. Then 30 years with IBM working on almost every type of computer made, but still have seen anything to match what we had in the B52D's. I would really like to find an old Tracker, Bomber, Polor Converter. The people I work with in computers now, can't believe we did it all with a bunch of motors and gears.
William (Bill) Wynn <wlwynn@attbi.com>
Orange Park, FL USA -
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Just stumbled upon this site,lots of familiar names,would like to hear from those that know me. I remember Homestead (1956-1961),minot(1961-1965),Warner Robins(1965-1970),Wurtsmith(1971-1974)and back to Warner Robins(1974-1976). Anyone remember Richard Mauller,John Spiese,Richard Galloway,Ted Enfinger or Don Gordon.
Frank Zujkowski <jfzuj@cyber-south.com>
eufaula, al USA -
Hey, Bob, Funny running into here (Dr. Leffew - USF). The D's and E's are in the graveyard (I believe the D's were actually chopped as part of STARTII). I believe that only Barksdale and Minot are the only two _active_ duty bases for BUFFs (H's). The reserves got the G's, but I don't know which bases got them. Later, Dale Neidhammer
Dale Neidhammer <dneid@nassda.com>
USA -
Hi all, I live near Harrisburg, PA, and while I was out running errands this morning I saw a B-52 flying around, probably doing touch and go's at the Harrisburg airport. It was either a G or H model because it had the shorter tail. It got me wondering, are there any models D, E, or F still flying? Also, what bases still have B-52's? Anybody know? Bob Zellner, ex 32150E(RB-36) & F(B-36) and ex Q-38 tech rep (IBM)
Bob <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Madison, PA USA -
Hello, once again. My first post last night occurred while suffering through three hours of finance lectures. As can be seen, not the most coherent post. Thought I would try again. First, thanks for the site!! Great to have a place to meet up with fellow bomb/nav'ers. The time I spent working on BUFFs had a huge impact on my life for the better. I was heading nowhere when I joined the Air Force. Momma AF helped me reverse the rectal-cranial inversion syndrome I was suffering from. So, I entered Lackland AFB on 27 Apr 77 (amazing how that date sticks in mind after 25 years!) From Lackland it was off to Lowry for tech training. I aced the fundamentals classes and discovered that I did have a talent for this electrical thing. On the Bomb/Nav class. I remember two names from class: Doug Hamouz (sp?) and Ken Lawver. Ken contacted me several years ago and is doing good. He did not make it through Bomb/Nav, but that was due more to the flake he married at Lowry. Doug made it through and was PCS'ed to March AFB. I was sent to Carswell AFB in late Dec 77. Carswell has numerous great memories and a couple a sad moments (Larry Wadkins in particular... gotta wonder what his life could have been if he hadn't died :-( ) At Carswell I met Terry Larson (we were room-mates for quite awhile), Dave Runge, Mike (Chester) Nowak, Jack Simko, Dave Barnett, Chuch Hamaker, Neil (gotta check my hair) LeMaire (sp?), Bob Flynn, Mike "No Chin" Enslin, Gary Lee, Dave Hemeon, Glenn (will that ash ever fall) Thomas, Don Orrel (sp?), Herb Runkle, Jim (the boot) Hutchison,and others whose names I just can't dredge out of the ooze I call a brain. I had a great time while at Carswell. So many memories... Terry and his "I'm a soul man" thing, Dave Runge and his flying, passing out in Simko's papasan chair, riding launch with Barnett and playing more pinochle than any one human should, Larry and Eddie Van Halen's Eruption (still miss him). Alert horns and ORIs and midnight chow and the dance with the babes from TWU, Lake Benbrook, cruisin' the mall, hunting with Chuck and Dave (that stayed with me & "Hello, Mrs. Hamaker, can Chuckie come out and play today?") So, so many memories of a period in time that helped define the man I became. From Carswell, I shipped out to Anderson in Jul 80. Had a blast on Guam. Names I remember... Mark Soli, Ernie (SMSgt), Mark Lavimonaire, Bob, Steve, Chris Hauser (Fire Control), Bob Morgan (Autopilot), Scott Harpster (Autopilot), Rick Krisnoski (sp? ECM),Mark Schafer (ECM), Dave Dotts (Fire Control), and others that I can not recall. Guam was what you made of it. I got lucky and fell in with some great guys and pretty much stayed off the booze (not that I didn't have a few nights in the NCO club!!) and enjoyed the island and Okinawa (anyone remember the Banana Lady?) and Australia. From Anderson it was out with an Honorable and I returned to school on the GI Bill. There I met my wonderful wife of 17 years. I graduated in 1988 with my BSEE from the University of South Florida. From there I went to Grand Rapids to work for Smiths' Indutries doing maintainability engineering. Did several analyses on systems that would wind up in C-130s and AC-130s. Overall, enjoyed the work, but I really wanted to do analog design. I was able to pursue and secure a position with Texas Instruments in Dallas, Texas in summer of 1989. I was with TI for 7 years and realty enjoyed my time there. In fact, I was involved in the "Bunker Buster" Paveway development at TI that came about during Desert Storm. This led to me finally getting a flight on a BUFF during the first two test drops of the weapon. Great airframe!! The old girl can still fly like a scalded cat at altitude. From TI I went to Epic Design Technology as a field applications engineer. This job was a ball!! I left Epic about six months after Epic was acquired by Synopsys. I bounced around several different startups, finally arriving back with the gang from Epic after they all had left Synopsys/Epic. This has been the startup I have been looking for. Stock performance has been good and I should be able to put a significant amount of $$ in the bank. As I returned to Nassda, I decided to pursue an MBA degree. I started that last fall and have enjoyed the heck out of it. I put all this out there to share with you all just what the Air Force did for me. I honestly believe that a great deal of what I have in my life is due to two things: the Grace and God and His Son Jesus Christ and the impact that the Air Force had on me during a very formative period of my life. In fact, I have sent many people who had not figured out life into the military. The overwhelming majority of these people came out of the military and have made great strides forward in their lives. I guess you can say some thing similar to what they say about the Corp... "You can take the man out of the Air Force, but you can't take the Air Force out of the man!" Only wish we had something clever to say like Semper Fi!! Any ways, I'll go through my old photo album and find some pictures to scan and submit to the web site. I have one of a D model just rotating on take off at Anderson en route to Kadena for a typhoon evacuation. In fact, it is framed and hanging on my office wall. It gets comments from almost everyone who sees it. BTW, anyone remember 0099 on Guam (the pump house queen?) Thanks again for taking the time to put this web site together and maintaining it!! Regards, Dale Neidhamer 32150L SSGt (USAF Reserve) - more on that later Sgt (USAF Active) dneid@nassda.com 512-743-6859
Dale Neidhammer
Austin, TX USA -
DELETED
Wow, talk about old memories!! Just found the page and took a long walk down memory lane. Entered the AF in Apr 77. Tech school at Lowry Apr77 to Dec77. From there to Carswell until Jul80. Shippped to Andersen and separated in Sep 82. Went to college on the GI Bill and got my BSEE in 1988. Moved back to Dallas in 1989 to work for Texas Instruments as an analog IC designer for ~7 years. Left TI and moved to Austin to work with a software company and have never looked back. Married for 17 wonderful years and have 3 sons. I would like to track down Chuck Hamaker who was at Carswell when I arrived and left sometime around 81 for Edwards AFB. Lost track of him from there. Great to find the site!! Later, Dale Neidhammer
Dale Neidhammer <dneid@nassda.com>
Austin, TX USA -
You have a great website with lots of memories!
Charlie Taliaferro <charles@kitchentablegang.org>
NAS Lemoore, CA USA -
Just found this wonderfull site. I was BNS at Fairchild from 65 to 68.Seen alot of names that I rember and a few that I know I should. I was the tall guy who seemed always to get with a shorter person either as a trainee or as a trainer which made for trying times under the chindome.I TDYed to Guam either with the Wing or filling in the other Wings.I'll always remember July 7,1967 the day I was hardhat and taxied with the BUFF fixing a radar problem, luckily I fixed it before takeoff but doppler was leaking air pressur and the nav asked if I could fix it but the Maintance Control chief said just turn the valve off and get off the plane. The next day I was told I was the luckest guy on Guam because the plane was one of the two that had a midair collision and was lost at sea.Really did enjoy BNS but I retrained into computers and spent the rest of my carrer bouncing around from Offutt,Indian Mountain AFS, and finially at Duluth IAP.Hope to hear from some you that rember me.
Dan Lightcap <dalite88@lycos.com>
Shamokin, PA USA -
A great site – lots of memories! I’m Ernest Wiatrek, a Bomb-Nav tech from 1967 to 1987, then Mission Sys Br. Chief, then later a B-1B (ugh…) manager until I retired in 1997. I worked mostly in the field shop during my tech days, arguing with flightline troops as to whether the RTC unit was “really” bad or not. Great fun – great times. Hope you don’t mind reading a little of my assignments and the people I had the pleasure of working with, most of which I just can’t remember now: *** Lowry: 1967 – 1968: Technical School *** Minot AFB: 1968 – 1972: Flight line for several months, then MSgt Avilar (Shop Chief) decided I was too wimpy and put me in the shop. The flightline supervisor wanted to NRTS everything but the field shop chief refused to do so! Some great buddies: Clarence Handel, RG Ketchum, Peter Sturges, John Bonato, Jim Burke, John Vaszlavik, Marty Gross, Bernie Becker, Bill Gaudet, Terry Pinder, Mike Cordray, Mike Callahan, Jim Mizell, Jules Frederick, Lyle Schaefer, Harry Warwick, Mike Bollenbach, Rick Gilbert, Bobby Jones, and many others. My time there (with my wife, Liz) was grand. *** Loring AFB: 1972 – 1976: Field Shop and Bomb Comp. Went to work with the “new” 017 and 018 test sets. Stupid MADRECs. Flew in bombers as an in-flight weenie. CNDd many RTCs and RT units. Many friends: Jim Brewer, Mike Schwab, P. Denfield, Oliver, P. Desnoyers, John DeCalogne, Barnett, RPM, Wilbur Chevis, Kim Cudebec(?), R. Swinford, Harold Fulks, Ski, Mike Nunno *** Barksdale: 1976 – 1986: Field Shop mostly, then Shop Chief. Fun!? Incredible tales. Co-workers: Gerry Ferraro, Dennis Clark, Jerome Perkins, Don Webster, Phil Clark, Cathy Rivers (Cathy, I apologize for a lot! Write!), Bill Perkins, Ann Bancker, Laura Linder, Bob Brewer (chess loser!), J. Frederick(s) again, Howard Sherwood….., Don & Terry Linnell, Terry Clampitt, Mark Nault, Jerry Osborn, Robert Price, Jerry Edwards, Mike Lee, Paul Skipper, and dozens others. Memory fails. What a tour! *** HQ 8AF, Guam, HQ 8AF: 1986-1990: Much non-tech, stuff-shirt, blues-wearing times. Ron Hendryx, Ernie Lewis, Debbie Parnell, wow, and I can’t remember much after that. ***Griffiss AFB: 1990 – 1995. Maint Super, but spent much time (less than I wanted, hanging around the BNS radar tower, hoping to tweak the RT AFC circuits on the side. Then we went to OAS and the “beauty” of the ASQ-38 started to fade. At least we got rid of the FCS, and the ECM types finally learned that THEY had the problems, not us! *** Dyess AFB: 1995 – 1997: B-1B life... But I still watched the skies for an occasional B-52 flyby! Bomb-Nav life was the finest, but I wish I could have done some things differently. Things should have been said, others not. MSET sucked, but the ORIs were fun. Weekend standby always had a TA alignment going, and who cares if the Maggie arcs a little bit!! Ernie Wiatrek ernlizzy@hotmail.com Abilene, TX
Ernest Wiatrek <ernlizzy@hotmail.com>
Abilene, TX USA -
Okay, now and then a face with a name crosses the windmills of my mind. Here are a few more Bomb/Nav'rs I recall. Orv Hanson, Paul Porter, Earl Polly, The Armer Brothers (Heber and I can't remember his brothers first name), Kerry Brown, Carl Christenson, James Brewer, Jim Blevin, Speedy Gonzalez (from S-J and Denver. Francis Johnson, to be continued.
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
Clayton, NC USA -
DELETED
Served at 9th a&e, 1st b/n, Mountain Home AFB Idaho 1954-57. Missed the 1996 reunion and wonder if another is planned. Great place, good times, the best people I have ever known. Give me a shout if you'r out there !
Ran Gemmell <rangemmell581@msn.com>
Orange, ct USA -
Am I the only old codger out here old enough to remember the "K" system and the APS 23??? Frank Hunt frankohunt@hotmail.com
Frank Hunt <frankohunt@hotmail.com>
Charleston, SC USA -
Cecil Hinson is at Chinson@nc.rr.com,(thanks to Alfie) and I heard from Richard "oink " Ryberg, still alive!. Amazing... Hickox had to hold his hand and point the way home from the club or we wouldn't see "oink" for the next. week.But oink could sure fix airplanes!. >>Still searching for Don Howe..58s and 52s and Billy Joe Johnson. HELP!!!
bill eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
USA -
3523rd A@e @ Mcconnell AFB.Was bomb nav tech 52-56. Would enjoy hearing from folks that knew me. I worked most of my years for William Cogdill. You around Bill?
Joe Bedwell <papajoebed@aol.com>
Aurora, MO USA -
A few more names.R.J.Williams,Tola Harris,George Carlin(The Comedian)George was in the 376th at Barksdale 1955-58. John Hebert.Robert (Double R) Williams.J.V. Calvert. You Atlas fellows will remember him).Jack Proyr,Mac Mccormick, Vince Perino.Herman Schmidt,(deceased).Gene Wade,Charlie Scott(both of them).Charlie White,Tom Kunich. Willie Perdue
will perdue <w1perdue@aol.com>
vinton, va USA -
Gaylord Mason.....Eppie7@winco.net is alive and well Terrell Hickox..... Terrellinmaine@juno.com is alive and well Does anyone know where Don Howe "Howie is?" Last known address.. Fort Worth
Bill Eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
Aurora, CO USA -
Would like to add a few more B/N guys from the early Barksdale days: Gary Barber, Dave Bell, Bill McDade, Bill Ladick, Gus Fiongos, Mike Nolan, Henry Bledsoe (deceased), Glen Carter, Lonnie Woodard (deceased), Newton Wright, Ed Knable, Don Gooding, Harold Gooding, Lou Jurado, Chuck Stevens, Don Ross, Chief Binom Jenkins, Chief Vernon D. Lieser, William L.Williams, Gaylord Mason, James Southern, Bob Horne,Joe Wall(tech rep), Emory Buffington, Bradshaw, Andrews, Humes. I'll add more later as they come to mind.
Fred Double <fpooderdoo@aol.com>
Bristolville, OH USA -
felt the need to add names to "the big list" a lot are q-48 guys but some go back to "k" systems wow!!!! some are q-38 some are hq guys i met while there but for what it's worth hope it stirs some memories....... ward hogue, terry fiedler, dan lightcap, darrell frazier, ivan knutson, gene collier, john laylon, terry hickock billy robinson, cecil hinson, charlie white, guy (chunky) spilman (deceased) jack (jj) hall (deceased) ralph hall, jack barefoot, dick macke, ralph dickerson, rick ellis, george gibbons, vern constantine, steven mays, donald clor, billy thompson, joe castro, victor garcia, renaldo, rodriguez, joe lakey, dick gould, jack omohundro, bill smith (not the one at edwards), larry peterson, don jordan, bobby jordan, john sahgen, henry pare, gary (festus) hagen, bill overby, ernie tamez, carl lafitte, dorman griffin, oliver guy, les kilpatrick, gil quinton, jim koppa, jim harbin, dave fgrazier, ed griffin, "wex" wiley, john neal, dick purcell, aaron (snake ) snowden bob lawson, brent (crash) landon, hank snow, paul dailey, leo mcgoogan, "qt" quattelbaum, john sidney decologne, bob swisher, butch parthree, gary miller, .......... i have worked with, known them, coordinated with, learned from, hopefully did a favor for and generally have fond memories of the days when we were all warriors and peace was our profession. there is not a day that goes by that i don't miss that time in our lives. keep the faith al hall (alfie)
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
Here's some BombNav types from a long time ago, 1951-1954 at Rapid City AFT, SD (Now Ellsworth). Bill Stevenson, Howie Miller, Jim Boe, Ross Bell, Bob Norelli, Arnie Johnson, Jack Welch, and Nick DeLeonardis. Bob Zellner
Bob Zellner <r.o.zellner@att.net>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
Some Bomb/Nav'rs I recall not already listed: Fred Palmer, Dan Zeigler (Tech Rep), Joe Gordy (Tech Rep), Sam Farrow, Tom pippin, Tony Messier, Bill Gatlin, Francis Johnson, Leroy Pfaff, Bill Chastain, Bugsy Seigel, Spider Lassiter, Paul Harris, Clyde (Hos) Hostetter, Ed Abel, Nick Gerbasi, Paul Desnoyers, Don Nelson, Bob Whitlock, Rick McGill, A. D. Daniels, Bill Rollins, Dan Uplinger, Armand Wilhite, Jerry Johnson, Toby Ledbetter, Bob Smith are a afew I recall off the top of my head. I'll add more as they come to mind
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
Clayton, NC USA -
Great site. A Call to All Bomb Navs. Would like those that are interested to contribute the history of their unit to Air War Vietnam. The site will feature stories and information on SEA flying units and scans of photographs and patches. Those that contribute will have a link from their section to their site. This sites purpose is to honor those that paid the ultimate price and to help promote sites of individuals, units and organizations that have a SEA focus. Thanks for your time. Mark, USAF, Ret.
Mark Bacon <akbacon@alaska.net>
Anchorage, AK USA -
Email for Don Parmele...dparm37702.aol.com.... The most "worthless" BN troop I ever met. Couldn't find his way home from the club without help! Gaylord Mason, wife Eppie. "Eppie7@winco.net......Still the original Gaylord. B-58s and B52Hs.
Bill Eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
Aurora, CO USA -
P.J. Turner gave me Parmele's email. Lord, P.J. and Don must be "ancient BombNav troops" B-45s??? I worked the B-66 but only when the weenies in France and England couldn't. Think I was stationed with Pettigrew somewhere... A real capable and intelligent person. Definitely smarter than me because I declined the IBM invite to make money. Somedays I regret that decision. Remember his face and demeanor but can't recall where we met. Added to the list of fame: McGill, Denny Clark, Mike Rehling, Jim Godown, Jim Bennett, Leon Fullwood, Bill Robinson, Scott Story, Bill Wiggs(The original Chieh of BN), Dan Rollo, Steve Doerr, Mike Rydel
Bill Eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
Aurora, CO USA -
My name is Edmund Marco and it's a pleasure to sign your guest book. I work for an advertising agency in London. Our agency represents direct marketing companies that are involved in the marketing of products as seen on TV in England. Most of the infomercial products come from the U.S. but then again we export our talents as well. My brother has appeared in infomercials in the U.S. advertising various products. I think it's hilarious that English people respond so well to American products while Americans tend to respond well to sales people who have an English accent!
Edmund
London, Kent England -
Bill E. Good old buddy of mine from Loring, Mike Pettigrew. Last I knew was working for IBM in Fishkill,NY. Bill Devol? Ha, ran into him in Loring and Lowry.. Will have to dig into the cobwebs of the memory bank for other names.
Bill Farris <dipnet@gis.net>
USA -
Bill, I remember a lot of those guys. Here's some more: Bill Robinson, Mike Rehling, Leon Fullwood, Mike Tickle, Terry Ganzel, Wes Fullwood, Burt Wells, Billy Reynolds, Bob Warren, Joe Alex, Dan Rollo, Charlie Beck, Dennis Clark, Bill Wiggs, Steve Piepmeier, Ted Patterson, Ted Dlugosz, Bill Spooner, Bill Treckman, Jim Nagel, Calvin Reeves, Dennis Bradley, Scott Story, Frank Zujkowski, George "Ben" Basferd, O.P. Malone, Jim Bennett. A lot of true B/N "characters" in these lists. How about some more?
Larry Anderson
Edmond , OK USA -
To continue: Rady Meacham, Don Parmele, Gaylord Mason, Don Howe, "Wild" Bill Hawkins, Jim Koppa, Jerry Ferero, Larry Anderson, Billie Johnson, John Pruitt, Terrell Hickock, Glenn Shermann, RD(sam)Ketchum,George Morin, Walt Thompson, Don Allen, Bob Mersinger, Bob Force, Jim French, P.J. Myatt, Quattlebaum, Richard Ryberg, Ron Hendrix, Bill Hembree, Donny Lossner, Ernie Waite, B.J. Harris, G.W.Harris, Denny Hill, Sis Clarke, C.A. Meldrom,Doug Dupray, Mike McColeman, Archie Anderson, Al Drobek, Dick Collett, Truitt James, George Kellogg, Felix David, Bill Devol, Jim Redmon, Bill Farris, Dave Roberts, Duane Loeck, Jim Miller, Frank Matlock, Bill Rice, Fred Watkins, Harold Townsend, Roy Roberts, Eugene Kopp, Jaime Rualan
Bill Eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
USA -
I've been chatting with Jim Skinner about the "old" days and compiled a list of names to tweak your brains\.
Bill Eirish <eirish1>
Aurora, CO USA -
Hi all you "old" Bomb Nav'rs. I had not been out here lately and just stopped by to look in. Good to see some old friends still around. Quite a history out here. Even unique. You don't see any sites like this from other AFSCs. Really a brotherhood. I even had some Fire Control folks contact me after being stopping by here. I've been out almost as long as I was in but sometimes at night the dream of the "perfect" TA alignment creeps into my sleep. You remember those, the ones that could be done in two hours. Question: Does anyone know if the last B52 built, 61-040, is still flying? In the late 60's and early 70's I thought I was part of it sometimes. I flew 2-3 times a week on it the last days of Homestead and then up at Wright-Pat. Just wondering if they ever wore it out.
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
Clayton, NC USA -
I just returned from a visit to the Little Rock AFB Arkansas. It was such a delight to see the B-47-E on static display at the front gate but it was even more delightful to see the stone columns with the names of the men I served with from 1955 through 1961 while with the 384th Bomb Wing (M). It made me feel proud to know we were the beginnings of what became BOMB/NAV. The names were of the men who served the entite tour of the E-modle from '55 through '64. The good old days were not perfect but they were good. It was just nice to remember!!! Thanks for letting me spout off. Frank O. Hunt 32130E to 32170K
Frank O. Hunt <frankohunt@hotmail.com>
Charleston, SC USA -
I saw the pictures of the b52E that was blown up in the Mohave desert. That is 57-119 which was assigned to Clinton-Sherman AFB. I spent many hours working on her. It is sad to see her in this shape. oXPD
tom smithson < >
USA -
Hello to all my fellow Bomb Nav troops out there. I really have mixed feelings as I post this message—A deep feeling of pride in having been a part of a truly elite group of professionals in the B-52 Bomb Nav career field maintaining the most awesome weapon system in the world; and a bit of sadness as the end of my active duty service rapidly approaches. I’ll be starting terminal leave on 3 Jun and ending a career that started in May of 1979. My assignments have included 5th AMS (SAC), Minot AFB, ND from Feb 80 to May 84, 4200th and 31st TES (SAC), Edwards AFB, CA from May 84 to Aug 87. I was assigned to Tinker working for HQ SAC on the B-2A program from 1987 until the Command stood down in Jun 92. Worked for HQ ACC for a couple of years then moved on to Barksdale, 20th Bomb Sq. in 1994. PCA’d to the 49th TES in 1995. Came back to Tinker working for the 412th LSS (AFMC) in 1999 in the B-2 world again. I’d like to express my deepest appreciation to Jon and Cindy for maintaining this website. I had the pleasure of working with them at Barksdale and they truly represent what Bomb Nav is all about. Thanks also to all the people who I’ve worked for and with over the past 20+ years. I’ve made so many friends (and probably a few enemies) that I couldn’t possibly list all the names here. I’m proud to be a member of the Bomb Nav family. It’s been a great ride and if I could, I’d probably do it again. To all you young troops, remember that no matter what they call us, we will always be BOMB NAV!
Tom Colen <tomcolen@att.net>
Midwest City, OK USA -
32150L to 32170K to 45670...been Bomb-Nav for 21 years, mostly at Barksdale. It's a sad day now that they call us Comm/Nav Mission Systems. I'll be retiring this summer 2002. Jon and Cindy you've done a great job with this site. Keep up the good work and good luck bringing on the new systems out at Edwards. Also hope to hear from some of the old Bomb-Navers who browse these pages. I promise I'll dig up my old DBNS pictures from the last D-model that ever flew. I powered up every light operational in the Radar and Nav stations and took pictures before we put it on display at the Battleship Alabama in Mobile. Unfortunately they got packed away during a PCS. I will dig them out soon and send to you so you can post them for all to see.
Mike Lee <mike@leesite.com>
Bossier city, LA USA -
Even though I served only one tour (1977-81) I proudly maintain, "Once a BombNav troop, always a BombNav troop." I spent 3 1/2 glorious years at Griffiss, a winter wonderland. Finding this site brought back many great memories of work, people and of course the aircraft we all so admire. I now live in Tucson, AZ and am a stones throw away from the boneyard. I used to see BUFFs by the dozens lined up, but over the years they have systematically disappeared bringing more than a few tears to my eyes. I would like to share a war story and a confession with you all. In 1981, just weeks away from my separation, Griffiss was tasked to receive the first operational OAS modified B-52G. I want to say it was 347, but anyone who was there might be able to correct me if I am mistaken. Regardless, my story/confession begins here…a warm August morning in 1981. We were all on 12 hour shifts with the arrival of the first OAS bird and General Lew Allen was scheduled to visit the base this day to see our new baby. I, and another BombNav tech ( a beautiful girl on loan from Blytheville ) were dispatched, just before sun up, to perform some routine maintenance on the aircraft. At some point that morning I crawled under the desk at the NAV station and dragged the flood light with me to illuminate my task (I'd done this at least a thousand times before, right?). After doing whatever it was I was there to do I returned the flood light to the desk without looking, setting the light on the desk above me (again, at least a thousand times). Well, the difference now is that there is a keyboard on that desk. We finished our work and disembarked the plane. I took one last look around the flightline that morning for it was my last day. I was out-processing later that morning and I knew I would probably never see or be there again. My partner and I hopped into the truck and headed back up the hill to wait for shift change. Just as the day shift was rolling in and the night shift was briefing them and I was saying my final farewells to all my colleagues and friends a frantic call came in from Job-Control. Apparently, some idiot melted the keyboard at the NAV station and General Allen was mere moments away from inspecting our new baby. Panic erupted in the shop and I said, "Well, good lucks guys, I've got out-processing appointments to get to…adios." I always wondered if they removed those floodlights or put some kind of warning on them because of my little mishap. Well, that's my war story. I sure do miss the games of Risk during Global Shield, Pinochle and banging my head on the bulkheads…MAN! They was hard!
James Adams <design53@cox.net>
Tucson, AZ USA -
Even though I served only one tour (1977-81) I proudly maintain, "Once a BombNav troop, always a BombNav troop." I spent 3 1/2 glorious years at Griffiss, a winter wonderland. Finding this site brought back many great memories of work, people and of course the aircraft we all so admire. I now live in Tucson, AZ and am a stones throw away from the boneyard. I used to see BUFFs by the dozens lined up, but over the years they have systematically disappeared bringing more than a few tears to my eyes. I would like to share a war story and a confession with you all. In 1981, just weeks away from my separation, Griffiss was tasked to receive the first operational OAS modified B-52G. I want to say it was 347, but anyone who was there might be able to correct me if I am mistaken. Regardless, my story/confession begins here…a warm August morning in 1981. We were all on 12 hour shifts with the arrival of the first OAS bird and General Lew Allen was scheduled to visit the base this day to see our new baby. I, and another BombNav tech ( a beautiful girl on loan from Blytheville ) were dispatched, just before sun up, to perform some routine maintenance on the aircraft. At some point that morning I crawled under the desk at the NAV station and dragged the flood light with me to illuminate my task (I'd done this at least a thousand times before, right?). After doing whatever it was I was there to do I returned the flood light to the desk without looking, setting the light on the desk above me (again, at least a thousand times). Well, the difference now is that there is a keyboard on that desk. We finished our work and disembarked the plane. I took one last look around the flightline that morning for it was my last day. I was out-processing later that morning and I knew I would probably never see or be there again. My partner and I hopped into the truck and headed back up the hill to wait for shift change. Just as the day shift was rolling in and the night shift was briefing them and I was saying my final farewells to all my colleagues and friends a frantic call came in from Job-Control. Apparently, some idiot melted the keyboard at the NAV station and General Allen was mere moments away from inspecting our new baby. Panic erupted in the shop and I said, "Well, good lucks guys, I've got out-processing appointments to get to…adios." I always wondered if they removed those floodlights or put some kind of warning on them because of my little mishap. Well, that's my war story. I sure do miss the games of Risk during Global Shield, Pinochle and banging my head on the bulkheads…MAN! They was hard!
James Adams <design53@cox.net>
Tucson, AZ USA -
70-72 19 Bomb Wing Robins AFB Georgia May 72 to November 72 TDY U-Tapao
Mike Fortenberry <mfortenberry@buffalorock.com>
Birmingham, AL USA -
Looking for 1/506 INF Div C/Company 69/70 many firebases?
Shanawanikki <treestanding@bigfoot.com>
Nye, NV USA -
Looking for 97th BW patches from Blytheville, AR and would like to find a SAC coin, any challenge coin with SAC emblem on it, Sq, wing or Grp not important. Thanks Ken
Ken <kennymabryjr@yahoo.com>
USA -
Just wanted to let everyone know we are back up and an update will be coming real soon. Jon
Jon Vanover <bombnav@bombnav.org>
USA -
Good to hear all the old war stories from fellow Bomb Navs out there. Stationed at Carswell AFB (7OMS) 89-92, Minot AFB (23BS)92-96, Dyess AFB (96-97) and then cross trained to Command & Control after working the Bone. Only had the privilage of working a few "G" models; but loved that STRAT radar system in the "H". The Bone had a nice radar set also. Currently stationed at McConnell AFB and still enjoy talking to the bombers over the UHF from time to time. Would love to hear from any of my old flightline buddies out there. Keep em flying!
Christopher Mathis <bigdaddygringo@hotmail.com>
McConnell AFB, KS USA -
Carswell AFB 1971-72 Andersen AFB 1972-1973 Operation Bulletshot Carswell AFB 1973-74
Robert Matthews <rjmhrt@hotmail.com>
CA USA -
Great site and pictures. I see my old buddy Bill Eirish made an appearance. USAF 1964-1976, Walker AFB, Little Rock AFB, Loring AFB, Lowry AFB.
Bill Farris <dipnet@gis.net>
Chatham, MA USA -
bomb nav rocks!!! although i have only been working them for 8 years, they have been the some of the best years of my life. I also have BUFF maintainers coins for sale. I would also like to add...COMM NAV SUCKS!!!!
james williams <williamj@minot.af.mil>
minot, nd USA -
Feb 4,1960 Lackland AFB TX. Apr 1960 Lowry AFB CO. 321XXK ASQ-38 Bomb/Nav. System school. Dec 1960 Ramey AFB Puerto Rico . 72nd BW (H) B-52G & B-52E only one I ever worked on came in from Roswell AFB NM. with a boat in the bomb bay for someone tranfering to the Island. Some of Bomb/Nav guys V. I. Puliteo(?) R. Betner, E. Bitner, T. Menivhitt, D. Lowe, M. Dillon, H. Drisller, C.(Coone) Cole, J. Rulan, there was SSgt ex-Navy who I belive had the Navy Cross Korea War can’t recall his name. Was award 72nd BW SAC Maintenance man for Nov 1962 saving a Chrome Dome Mission on the runway. Did infinite T/A alignment long first then 24hrs short method Dec 1962 Carswell AFB TX. 7th BW (H) B-52F T29 trainer. Some of Bomb/Nav guys P. Dailey, R. Bollennski(?), H.Sherwood, D. Platt, H. Snow, D. Gibbon, R. Hendix, J. Beath, D. Smith, B. Landon, Apr 1965 Start of the TDY to Guam 4133rd BW (Provisional) worked on B-52B on hard alert from Biggs AFB TX. Waited for the war to start, boy what day put up 30 get 27 back two midair one to Clark AFB Philippine with JP-4 running ever where I understand the A/C received Dist.Flying Cross. Return back from TDY Aug 1965 Went back Sept 1965 to support Mather AFB 320th BW (H) B-52F Bomb/Nav guys like (DUKE) Snyder, T. (Bouncer) Brogdon (?) (Mushe) Callhand, T. Kane, In Sept/ Oct we started flying with the aircraft on required mission at end of runway. Back home in Dec. left alone 1966 except for Hays bomb dispenser testing at Hill AFB Utah was fun got help the crew chief prep the plane. Couldn't get promoted but was recommend for Air Force Commendation Medal for T/A work for the Bomb Wing SAC Percentage. Not bad for A1c with seven years service four years in gradespenser testing at Hill AFB Utah was fun got help the crew chief prep the plane. Couldn't get promoted but was recommend for Air Force Commendation Medal for T/A work for the Bomb Wing SAC Percentage. Not bad for A1c with seven years service four years in grade. Jun 1967 Fairchild AFB WA. 92nd SAW (H) B-52C B-52D Was forced cross train to 321x0L ASQ-48. TDY to Guam Jul 1967 with 2 weeks training to support Columbus AFB Ms .BW and Ellsworth AFB SD. 28th BW Some of Bomb/Nav guys H. Pare, J. Shagen, J.J. Hall, M.L. McGee, R. Kuntson, L. Fry, A. Dumas, T. Feddler, Eberlin, A. Hall, J. Harbin, W. Garner, R. Purcell, Came back in Oct 1967 with new rank of Sgt was give my AFCM and told that no A1c/Sgt deserved it. Mar 1968 the TDY of blue sky of Guam called. This time we support our self with the help of Pease AFB NH.509th BW (H) spent most of time on Launch truck and working aircraft between Launch that how I got to meet Lt.Gen S.D.Wells red balled to aircraft with stab unit tumbling called for parts start repairing told crew bag drag time running out kept working all eight engine running crew gone Launch over someone asked why air plane running on center taxiway they came out to check found tire were chock inside only me brake set, no taxi crew, bomb load of 60 ton and full fuel load. I removed from the plane taken Bomb Wing briefing room where JJ Hall and Mack McGee met me the Gen. came over ask some question told us set down and wait. We witness the biggest officer chew out in USAF history we looked at each other thinking what going happen to us. After the briefing the Gen. came over thank us for the help shook our hands. We all have story about repairing plane in flight IP-618, Polar Converter, Stab Unit, Modulator, R/T Unit. My story happen this way I took off on a plane with broken Polar Con. Fixed within the hour about 30 min. into flight a call on inter plane came asking for help radar inoperable after talking to the RN figure modulator problem lack some thing better to due told RN take top off modulator check tubes a little later he call back saying everything okay upon landing and debriefing asked RN he said one of big tubes was broken replaced it worked okay asked what tool he used I/P seat lap belt fitted nuts. Fixing 2 plane at same time pretty good . ell Sept 1968 back home but Mar 1969 come songs of Guam SEA TDY by this time Garner and I had about 534 days TDY time out of 4yrs. Declared Citizen of Guam Sept 1969 home again. New Shop Chief going send me TDY again 1970 walked down street to FTD.(ATC) looking for instructor on B-52G already had secondary AFSC 321X0K was taken so fast that SAC didn’t know until 2nd (AFCM) was award, spent 4 1/2 yrs 506 FTD Taught 321X0L crossing 321X0K set up T/A class on alignment of Computer, R/T unit. Set up EVS system class with live picture. Was sent TDY to K.I. Sawyer to help out on T/A Problem ran Class at night using shop mock-up and flight line alignment on planes they did most alignment without a hanger winter -40 deg found power signal very bad heater required on transmitter. mock-up would heat up after 4 to 5 hrs. 24vdc and power supplies would drop voltage found aluminum tubing as splice for electrical to mock-up hook-up. Some Bomb /Nav. guys D Butterfield, D. Plummer, CMS Castro, Turnner, R. Purcell, D. Nelson. Oct-Dec 1973 this TDY help on my 3rd (AFCM) SAC/ATC TSgt Jun 1974 Castle AFB CA. FTD.(ATC) 93rd BW (H) ( SAC) B-52G.What a place set up training for Bomb/Nav, T/A, EVS, Had Edwards AFB CA. Send Bomb/Nav. B-1 guys to look at EVS. Lt. Gen from (ATC) presented my 3rd (AFCM) at NCO Dinning Inn. 1975 turned teaching over to C.A. Meldrom, W. Mayfield. 93rd BW picked me up for 9mo. Bomb/Nav. M. Canoom (?), S. Jenkins, Jun 1976 ask for Grand Forks AFB ND. 319th BW B-52C B-52H Had the best time worked in 104 deg. to -80deg. had great people (RED)Smith, J, Dalton, G. Ferro (?), S. Doerr, both Mitchell, D.Gibbon, J. Beath, B. Landon, and bunch I can’t recall. Went to England for RAF Bombing Competition at RAF Marham Kings Lynn. Was equipped with the new AOU. computer and lost on untested correction on offset by Command Target Analysis. Pinned on Msgt, ate fish and chips and drank English Beer everyday, when to London for three days, best six week TDY. except for losing. 1978 worked on Bomb/Nav - SRAM tie-in Winning GEN. Dougherty SRAM Trophy with a score 711. When on terminal leave Dec. 1979 retired Mar.1,1980 award the Meritorious service medal. When to work Feb 4,1980 Rockwell International at Hanford site Department of Energy Richland Washington. Retired the site after 16 years 9 mo Nov 1996. My home is Yakima Washington E mail Bossman 456 @aol.com (BUFF WILL FLY FOR EVERY AND THE MEN WHO FLEW ON THEM) PS. I worked on all model of B-52s, B thru H. DOUGLAS E. PRAY
Douglas E. Pray <bossman456@aol.com>
yakima, wa USA -
Anyone else out there ever work on the"recon" 47s in Spain or N Africa(Sidi). You know the 47s that never existed and were controlled by the 55th Det in Omaha? One war story: 62 or 63.. The Belgian Congo was having their uprising and we got to entertain the Belgian Foreign Legion before the mission.. As they didn't have C-130s, we flew the missions under their flag with our birds. A mean, nasty, ugly bunch of paratroopers, sure was glad to be on their side. Anyhow, for 2 days that sat in the birds...hot..hot and stinky waiting for the ok to takeoff. Spent their time sharpening knives and practising killing each other. Word finally came, the birds left with all the Legionaires, they kicked ass and the mission once again "never existed".
Bill Eirish <eirish1@attbi.com>
Aurora, CO USA -
I work at Flashback Television in London, England and we produce the 'Battle Stations' documentary series for The History Channel. The next episode in production is 'B-52' and we will be looking at the history and development of the B-52 design and its use in the Cold War and Vietnam. We would very much like to contact any former B-52 crew members and ground crew who would be willing to be interviewed for the programme. We plan to feature veterans who can talk about the Cold War situation and what it was like to be on constant alert and what happened, when airborne you would receive coded instructions to fly to targets. How did crews respond to nuclear alerts? And in Vietnam...vets who can talk about missions over North Vietnam. We would be also interested in talking to anyone who can talk about the B-52 from post-Vietnam through to present day - through Gulf , Serbian and Afghanistan conflicts. You can find out about Flashback Television by visiting our web-site at www.flashbacktv.co.uk You can contact me by email or by telephone (and I can call you back!) on 011 44 207 490 8996. I look forward to hearing from you Yours sincerely Katie Chadney Associate Producer FLASHBACK TELEVISION 11 Bowling Green Lane London EC1R 0BD ENGLAND Tel: 011 44 207 490 8996 Fax: 011 44 207 490 5610 katiechadney@flashbacktv.co.uk
Katie Chadney <katiechadney@flashbacktv.co.uk>
London, UK -
Bill Eirish-missing part of your email addy-looking for Don Nelson-was my trainer at KI in early 70s-nice guy and mentioned you from March-thanks
Dan Lapham <lapham3@aol.com>
Mpls, Mn USA -
roger that on the reunion anyone who hasn't visited the BUF site should go to stratofortress.org there are some reunions in the offing that would serve as a platform for us old farts getting together. My wife and I are going to Wichita this April for the 50th anniversary of the 1st BUF flight. should be a fun trip.
Al Hall (Alfie) <minkey@netzero.com>
Carencro, La USA -
Good graphics. Wish I did your work?
Catherine Lake
San Diego, CA USA -
Got an email address for: Bill Hembree(lowry Instructor and March AFB) Billy Robinson Richard Ryberg(Oink) Jim Koppa( Chief, March AFB) P J Myatt, Marysville and Grand Forks Ozzie Loeck, Grand Forks and Lowery Walt Thompson, Dow and Lowery Billy Johnson, Barksdale and Dow Jack Starren, Grand Forks Tom Stenmann, Dow Ron Hendrix, SAC HQ Glenn Gill , Dow, Altus Terrell Hickock, SAC HQ Time for a reunion folks before TG=0
Bill Eirish <eirish1@attbi>
Aurora, co USA -
I went through Bomb/Nav school in 1954. Hate to tell you guys this, but I worked on the B 36, B 47, and B 52 and was never in SAC. Actually flew on the B 52 as a Bomb/Nav Technician. I was in ARDC, later AF System Command. Stationed at Kirtland AFB, NM. We "married" the plane to the bomb. I started out in the 4924th A&E Maintenance Sq., part of the 4925th Test Group (Atomic). We performed tests at Aniwetok and those "other" Pacific islands as well as the Nevada Test range. Had some unique experiences with some of those old birds. One of the B 52s I flew on is on display at the museum at Kirtland. Retired from the AF in 1974. Was at Kirtland until 1965, eleven years almost to the day. Hard to get away because of the security clearance. Went into the munitions field in 1965 and spent two years in SEA as a "humper".
Jim Cockerham <cockerham@amaonline.com>
USA -
I was a Navigator on D's for 160 Arc Lite excursions. Any old Radars remember the 10-foot piece of string we had to carry in case the true airspeed servo went out on the ASQ-48? When that happened, the Radar would tie the string around the servo and manually regulate the true airspeed input into the computer. Wasn't it fun????
Bruce Woody <bwoody@msn.com>
USA -
Bill Hembree, an ex Bomb Nav technician, called me from Henderson, Nevada on Christmas day to tell me about this site. When I opened it up, much to my delight I found the names of some people I worked with during my 21 and 1/2 years in the Air Force. Names of people such as Snake Garner, Alfie Hall, Jim Koppa, Wille Perdue and a few more. I joined the AF in December of 1952 and did basic training at Parks AFB, in California. here I was sent to Lowry AFB in Denver and went through electronics and Bomb Nav schools there. I was assigned to Fairchild AFB, Washington in November of 1953 where I spent the next six years and rose to the rank of T/Sgt, being spot promoted to T/Sgt by Gen. Powers, The SAC commander at the time, as a result of our accomplishments at the SAC Bombing Competition. In July 1960 I was transfered to Larson AFB, at Moses Lake, Washington. (just a move of 100 miles). When the base was closed in 1966 I retraced the 100 mile move back to Fairchild AFB. I was promoted to M/Sgt after this move. In 1967 I was the first Bomb Nav technician assigned to U-tapao Thailand to help set up the B-52 operation there. When I arrived there was only one B-52 on the base. However, there was a prolific construction program under way there and as soon as they poured some concrete a B-52 arrived and was parked on it. At that time the Bombers would fly out of Guam and some would land at UT and fly several missions from there and then return to Guam. When I left there in 1968 we were flying about 60 bomber sorties aday and up to 140 tanker sorties a day from UT. I was assigned bach to Fairchild AFB on my return from UT where I was promoted to SM/Sgt. Then,like most Bomb Nav technicians at the time, I got in the cycle of spending 6 months on Guam and 6 months home. In 1970 I was assigned to the FB-111 test program at Edwards AFB, In California. They hit me with a 5 year freeze to that program when I arrived there. Needless to say I wasen't overly fond of being stationed there and the only time that I pulled some strings during my AF career was to get out of there. I stayed at Edwards only 7 months and was reassigned back to Fairchild AFB. I was promoted to CM/Sgt after returning there. (I may be the only person in the AF that was promoted from A/3c through CM/Sgt on the same base.) I retired from the Airforce on 1 July 1974 and went to work for a bank. I spent one year with the bank and then quit to return to school as a full time student. I finished out my BA degree and went to graduate school and got my Masters degree. I went to work for Spokane County Community Services where I was the Program Manager for Substance Abuse treatment programs for 12 and 1/2 years. In 1997 Ilost Leona, My wife of 43 years, to cancer. There is another Lady in my life now, Rosemary, whom I imported from Ontario, Canada. I am fully retired now and spend about 5 days a week playing Golf. (Got my handicap down to a 7 this year). In the fall and winter I still get in a bit of hunting. At last count I had 19 guns in my gun cabinet and there I am out in the woods hunting with a stick. (bow and arrow.) For those of you who may be interested there are quite a few of the old Bomb Nav troops in the Spokane area. Bobby Jordan, Jim Koppa, Dave Frazier, and John Shagen live here. Lawson Jenkins lives in Clarkston, Washington just 100 miles down the road. There are probably a few more whom I can't seem to recall just now. (Bad case of CRS). Jim Harbin 405 N 5th Cheney,Wa 99004 jeh@icehouse.net
Jim Harbin <jeh@icehouse.net>
Cheney, Wa USA -
Bill Hembreem, an ex Bomb Nav technician, called me from Henderson, Nevada on Christmas day to tell me about this site. When I opened it up, much to my delight I found the names of some people I worked with during my 21 and 1/2 years in the Air Force. Names of people such as Snake Garner, Alfie Hall, Jim Koppa, Wille Perdue and a few more. I joined the AF in December of 1952 and did basic training at Parks AFB, in California. here I was sent to Lowry AFB in Denver and went through electronics and Bomb Nav schools there. I was assigned to Fairchild AFB, Washington in November of 1953 where I spent the next six years and rose to the rank of T/Sgt, being spot promoted to T/Sgt by Gen. Powers, The SAC commander at the time, as a result of our accomplishments at the SAC Bombing Competition. In July 1960 I was transfered to Larson AFB, at Moses Lake, Washington. (just a move of 100 miles). When the base was closed in 1966 I retraced the 100 mile move back to Fairchild AFB. I was promoted to M/Sgt after this move. In 1967 I was the first Bomb Nav technician assigned to U-tapao Thailand to help set up the B-52 operation there. When I arrived there was only one B-52 on the base. However, there was a prolific construction program under way there and as soon as they poured some concrete a B-52 arrived and was parked on it. At that time the Bombers would fly out of Guam and some would land at UT and fly several missions from there and then return to Guam. When I left there in 1968 we were flying about 60 bomber sorties aday and up to 140 tanker sorties a day from UT. I was assigned bach to Fairchild AFB on my return from UT where I was promoted to SM/Sgt. Then,like most Bomb Nav technicians at the time, I got in the cycle of spending 6 months on Guam and 6 months home. In 1970 I was assigned to the FB-111 test program at Edwards AFB, In California. They hit me with a 5 year freeze to that program when I arrived there. Needless to say I wasen't overly fond of being stationed there and the only time that I pulled some strings during my AF career was to get out of there. I stayed at Edwards only 7 months and was reassigned back to Fairchild AFB. I was promoted to CM/Sgt after returning there. (I may be the only person in the AF that was promoted from A/3c through CM/Sgt on the same base.) I retired from the Airforce on 1 July 1974 and went to work for a bank. I spent one year with the bank and then quit to return to school as a full time student. I finished out my BA degree and went to graduate school and got my Masters degree. I went to work for Spokane County Community Services where I was the Program Manager for Substance Abuse treatment programs for 12 and 1/2 years. In 1997 Ilost Leona, My wife of 43 years, to cancer. There is another Lady in my life now, Rosemary, whom I imported from Ontario, Canada. I am fully retired now and spend about 5 days a week playing Golf. (Got my handicap down to a 7 this year). In the fall and winter I still get in a bit of hunting. At last count I had 19 guns in my gun cabinet and there I am out in the woods hunting with a stick. (bow and arrow.) For those of you who may be interested there are quite a few of the old Bomb Nav troops in the Spokane area. Bobby Jordan, Jim Koppa, Dave Frazier, and John Shagen live here. Lawson Jenkins lives in Clarkston, Washington just 100 miles down the road. There are probably a few more whom I can't seem to recall just now. (Bad case of CRS). Jim Harbin 405 N 5th Cheney,Wa 99004 jeh@icehouse.net
Jim Harbin <jeh@icehouse.net>
Cheney, Wa USA -
Please have a look at my website on the former SAC base of RAF Greenham Common in the UK: www.megspace.com/politics/greenham/index.htm
Jonathan Sayers <fencer_js@yahoo.com>
READING, Berks, UK -
I went to school at Lowry in 1962 and went into Bomb/Nav on the B-47E. My first assignment was at Pease in New Hampshire. I worked on many Tracking Computers and Polar Converts. I was then assigned in 1965 to the B-58 program at Little Rock. I repaired many Sighting and Test panels and know the old computer test station like the back of my hand. When it was time to send the Hustler to the bone yard I was assigned to Grand Forks in 1970. They made a mistake and sent me to UTE school at Lowry, and while there I found out that the Tech School needed Instructors. I volunteered while I processing back from my 10 week TDY. I went to Lowry and became an Instructor from 1971 to 1975. I taught the UTE, EVS Test set(017, 018) and when SAC needed some computer qualified personnel five us left Lowry and went to the FTDs to teach the AOU. Bill Mayfield and I went to Castle and took over for Doug Pray. Indirectly because of this site I have made contact with an OLD BOMB/NAV troop, Ray Turner that I've seen in over 20 years. I didn't retire from active duty, but I did join the WA Air National Guard and finish out my time. When I first got in the Guard the first person I ran into was an exstudent from Lowry Doug Simpson. My kids found a book that everyone might enjoy, " Boeing's Cold War Warrior B-52 Stratofortess" by Robert F Dorr and Linsay Peacock. It list every B-52 ever manufactured and the story of the aircraft. I hope that you enjoy the book as much as I have and as much as I have enjoyed this site. Al Meldrom
Al Meldrom <cameldrom@nwinfo.net>
Selah, WA USA -
Arrived Lowry 1953, completed Bomb/Nav school June 1954, assigned to 55th SRW, Topeka, KS (RB-47E, -47H, -47K). Worked in Field Shop then Periodic Docks until Sept 1957. Reupped at Pease AFB, NH (B-47E) and worked in Field Shop until spring 1959, then in "Malfunction Junction" until August 1959. One of first PMEL class at Lowry, graduated Dec 1959. Assigned 72nd BW, Ramey AFB, PR (B-52, GAM72, GAM77) from Oct 1960 to July 1962 then back to Pease until discharge in Nov 1963. Joined Federal Electric Corp in Dec 1963 and assigned to Chateauroux, France in USAF Depot as PMEL Certification Inpector until Sept 1966. Worked for IBM Corp until 1990.
Robert H. Goss ("Hondo") <willowvt@sover.net>
Jericho, VT USA -
Hello Everyone . I have started a e group on yahoo for folks who have served with a B-52 or KC-135 outfit over the years or just are a fan . I thought somone here might be interested . the address is .. b52kc135@yahoogroups.com Also I am seeking a Stan/Eval patch from the 379th BMW at Wurtsmith ? Can anyone help ?
Robert <grim493@aol.com>
Chicopee , MA USA -
I was a K-System Bomb Nav Instructor at Lowery AFB in 1954-55. I transferred to Mather AFB in 1956-57 as a Flight line K-system Mechanic. I hope someone who remembers me will respond. I retired from the California Dept. of Water Resources in 1997.
George Payton <bigrope@attbi.com>
Sacramento, CA USA -
thank god for the web site stumble on it while searching for B47 information. I went to k-system school in lowery in 1954 and was send to Lake charles later that year. Was asigned to the 68 Bomb wing 68 AE sq.the base was in change over from b50 to B47 aircraft. waited till the security clearence came. Then to work one the fligt line. was selected for the field shop.work their for awhile than back to lowery for radar school. I was working on the aps23 radar at lake charles but when I arrival at lowery the change over to the new system radar system the aps-64 finish school than back to lake chales only to be sent tdy to brize norton raf base in england for 90 days.came back and work in the field shop until I was dicharge in 1958. and went to work for lockheed aircraft at idiwild airport NY on EC121 navy and airforce planes was a techician inspector and a flight inspector. For the last 30 years I am working for indepentent company on commecial aircraft.all types from small to 747 doing avionic and instruments. in shop and line. enough about my working life I would like to hear from some of the old men that I use to work with in the 68 AE this is a great site I would like to see some picture of the k-system and radar system if someone has them in shop and in aircralf.THANKS Harlan wheeler happleseed@yahoo.com
Harlan Wheeler <happleseed@yahoo.com>
Freeport,, , ny USA -
I was trying to send an email to Bill Eirish about common B/N pals, and it came back as undeliverable. If Bill or anyone that knows his new email reads this, get back to me. Thanks-
Dan Lapham <lapham3@aol.com>
Minneapolis, Mn USA -
I went through k-systems at Lowry In april "55" Then I went to Lake Charles AFB LA. .I went into the Bomb/Nav field shop.It sure was some great times.I went back in 00 ,and the place had been cleaned out . Except for the water tower. Makes you wonder if it happned at all.
Ray Ferazani <rayf44@hotmail.com>
So. Hamilton , ma USA -
Just found the site and it is great, retrained into Bom/Nav in l962, and was assigned Barkadale AFB, untill l968, and went into FB-lll program. Talk about an "old" Bom/Nav troop. Retired in l972.
Billy J Burke <billyburke@arkansas.net>
Hope, ar USA -
Hey, B-47 Bomb/Naver's..have you visited the B-47 Stratojet website. Great photos, history and letters. B-47 crews defended this country during the darkest days of the "cold war." Remember when the APS/23 and "K" system was state of the art?? Frank O. Hunt (one of Curtis E. Lemay's SAC trained killers)
Frank O. Hunt <frankohunt@hotmail.com>
Charleston, SC USA -
Just wanted to stop in and say hi to all and thanks for all the comments and stories. Keep the pictures coming and lets work together and keep the spirit of BOMB NAV alive. Jon
Jon
USA -
What a find! Lots of old friends on here, and lots of old memories revived. Jim Skinner, Bill Eirish, Tom Colen, Ray Turner and so many more. My Bomb-Nav background: 68-tech school (K shred)at Lowry. Then Robins and back to Lowry to teach in 71. Mather from 75-79. Edwards for ALCM flight test in 80. Wichita (the Boeing plant) for OAS flight test in 81, then to Minot for a few years. That was about it for actual Bomb-Nav. Ramstein on F-4s and F-16s from 84-86. SAC HQ in 86-88 timeframe for offensive avionics on B-1s. SEA of 55SRW at Offut 88-89. Tyndall (4484th Test SQ) was my last assignment. Retired in 91. Now with Boeing doing sustaining engineering stuff on B-1s. Man, I just can't get away from this avionics stuff for very long. Great website.
Larry Anderson <gailiea@aol.com>
Edmond, OK USA -
Would like to hear from anyone who served at Westover AFB in the 99th OMS around 1965. Please e-mail me. I am looking for some old friends to swap some war stories.
Jim Weldon <shodan55@aol.com>
Mt. Sterling, KY USA -
What a thrill to find this site!! My last assignment was 319th in Grand Forks in 1968. I worked in that great big ole' composite building down on the flight line. That's when I left the A.F. after serving for nearly 14 years of fixing tracking computers, modulators, Rt units, compass swings. wavy range marks and all the stuff in between. I graduated from as a "K Systems" Mech. at Lowery in September of 1955. Went straight from Lowery to Little Rock AFB, Arkansas while the 384th Bomb Wing was being re-established within the 825th Air Division. The base consisted of a few completed buildings and a lot of dirt roads and construction work. In fact they shuttled us back and forth from the base to Camp Robinson in a duece and a half until the barracks were completed. I spent from 1955 to 1961 in the 384th alternating between the A&E Squadron and Job Control (somebody had to do it) I made S/Sgt and passed my 32170-E test just in time to be re-assigned to the best base in the world. HOMESTEAD AFB Fla. WOW!! I loved it and the Air Force was kind enough to keep me there for five years. The the hammer fell. I got my orders for Grand Forks(brrrr) from 75 degree winters to 40 below winters. What a horrible thing to do to a good ole southern boy like me. But the memories I have of unit pride and my BOMB/NAV buddies made it all worth the trip. I would love to do it all over again.I remember the B-47-E and how I banged my head on the stab unit while checking that 300 volts dc motor on top. I loved riding in the 4th man's seat but somtimes we flew flew without a Navigator. That gave me a chance to play with the tracking handle and run "mock" bomb runs. You know, I believe I could still do that. Then I got a 32170 "K" added to my AFSC and off to B-52-H school. It was on base and taught by Tech Reps.Thank GOD for the "H" it kept me out of Viet Nam. Remember the SAC TDY's to Brize Norton, Uper Heyford, and Greenham Common? Did you ever get to to go to SIDI SLIME MAIN, North Africa or Moron Spain? Remember the camel saddles we brought back in the bomb bay? And badly they smelled.I remember the BOMB/COMP missions and how we all wanted to win. (we did a couple of times) And the SES missions down to MACDILL and BARKSDALE. Boy that Bosier City was quite a place. I remember a place called BLUE's RED DEVIL on the strip. Damned nearly got killed there. There a lot of water under the bridge now but the memories never fade. One of my favorite old timers is JOHN T. CUNNINGHAM one of the first Chief Master Sgts in the Bomb Nav business. Last I heqard Johnhad retired down in South Florida with his wife Gloria. Anybody out there in cyber land rember the 384th A&Efrom 55 to'61? the 19th A&E from 61 to '65 or the 319th A&E from 65 to 68?? By the way, I didn't throw away my 14 years of SAC service. I joind the Army Reserve in 69 and ended up with 33 years military service. After a little trip to Saudi Arabia (DESERT STORM)I retired as a Command sergeant Major.IT WAS GREAT RIDE and I would gladly do it allover again!!! Thanks again for the BOMB/NAV site. I have put it among my favorites. Frank O. Hunt Charleston, SC frankohunt@hotmail.com
Frank O. Hunt <frankohunt@hotmail.com>
Charleston, SC USA -
To each and every Tech who maintains the Bomb Nav systems today, a great BIG THANKYOU. I appreciate your dedication, service and long hours in yukky weather and places. Some days I wish I were still with you working on the Buff but then reality sets in. Lots of great memories, especially the quality of the people, the willingness to get the job done, and the insistance on "the mission comes first" Plus the way we took care of one anothers families when the time came for TDY. Missed my honeymoon and 1 kids birth due to flying or TDY but the "shop" made up for it. Lowry B47 school 59 Pease 100th BW 60-62 Zaragoza 62-64 Moron 64-65 Dow AFB 65-66 Lowry 66-67 March 67-70 Grand Forks 70-73 Lowry 73-79 Twenty years SAC time, with a brief stint in the American Toy Company( which was still controlled by SAC) To Err is human, to forgive is devine: neither of which is the policy of SAC. Keep up the great work and send the taliban a note from me.
Bill Eirish <eirish1@home.net>
Aurora, CO USA -
Bombnav from 06/66 to 01/88. Seymour Johnson 66-69, griffiss 69-75, beale 75-76, castle 76-84, guam 84-86, then they sent me to 8th hq in barksdale. put up with that desk job for one year and came back to merced. worked on kc-135 sims for 6 years and now work for the state helping vets find employment. actually have an old bomb nav guy living next door to me. Chris (lumpy) Colfelt. Excellent site, thanks for you time and effort putting it together.
jim eber <jeber@edd.ca.gov>
merced, ca USA -
Lookin to catch up with any Carswell D-types circa 81-83. Drop me a line
Thom dzekunskas <dzekunskas2hotmail.com>
Rock island, l USA -
LOVE IT! Have made contact with some old friends. This is great. Anyone have any info on the 9th Bomb Wing Reunion this past July at MT. Home AFB.
Raymond D Turner <trayedna66@AOL.com>
USA -
Thanks for all your work on this site. My dad (former Navy) worked on the B52 NAV sytem when he was at IBM. The history section is great!
WAYNE WALKER <quiztrumdad@YAHOO.COM>
RALEIGH, NC USA -
test
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USA -
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USA -
'Just found the bomb/nav site yesterday amd couldn't believe my eyes! Many thanks for creating it - what a great idea! I went to ASB-4/9/16 school at Lowry in 59, then went to the 5th Bomb Wing at Travis AFB, CA for rest of my 4 years. Was 32150K in the 5th AEMS and spent most of the time on the flight line, although my last few months were at Maintenance (Job) Control. I have a lot of great memories of my time at the the 5th. There were a lot of great people in that outfit, and I honestly remember more about those 3 years than I do about more recent years. I saw mention of TA alingments here, and I remember that our first one took 24 hours, our tech rep, and half the bomb/nav shop. I did some debriefing, and the flight crews were really good to us guys. I also remember some hairy times on "Mnute Man" duty in the old Metro bread trucks, hoping I could fix what ever the hell was wrong. One Sunday afternoon, we were launching a CD mission and I had the DCM pushing the B4 stand around under the radome for me. He was also handing me tools and trying to calm me down. Thanks, Col. Heino! I also remember my shop supervisor, MSgt Ray Dodson, one of the greatest men and bomb/nav techs I ever new. Our CO, Col. Hatley, was the finest man I ever met, always looking out for his troops. There are too many others to mention, but they are all right here in my mind. 'Sure would like to hear from any of the old gang at 5th AEMS, OMS, FMS, the 23rd Bomb Squadron or the 916th ARS. Thanks again to the man who put this web site together; it's really great to have it here, and I'll be back often. I'm gonna go look at those pictures now. Very best regards to all you guys.....
David S. Ross <w6res@aol.com>
Tucson, AZ USA -
BombNav '61-'82 B47 at Mt Home '63-'65 B58 '65 to '71 at both L'Rock and Grissiom '71 to '82 B52 G-H in order Barksdale, Mather and Bautiful downtown K.I Sawyer
Raymond D. Turner <trayedna66@aol.com>
Marietta, GA USA -
MD-1 Astro Compass Information I have the star tracker from an MD-1 system and would like to make it operational for use in astronomy. Looking for the wiring diagrams for the connectors and information on what those wires do. Thanks for any help, Brooke Clarke, N6GCE
Brooke Clarke <brooke@pacific.net>
Ukiah, CA USA -
Bomb/Nav Ellsworth 81-86, Barksdale 86-89. Now working control systems for Natural Gas Pipeline.
Mark Winder <mark.winder@enron.com>
Inverness, FL USA -
LOWERY 1954,Barksdale 55,(B47Bs)Kendly Field, Bermuda 55.Lajas, Portugal late 55. Then Upper Hayford, England for 6 months.Back to Barksdale 376BW until late 1957. PCS to Fairchild AFB.PCS/PCA Lowrey for 32170B (44 weeks),back to Fairchild until 1959 then back to lowery for 32170D school(another PCS/PCA) (44 weeks) back to Fairchild. 1963 PCS larson AFB until 1965. Several short TDYs to Rapid city, March AFB as well as operation Dusty Beard and Cold Lake. Went for 32170L training and PCS to March AFB.3 TDYs to Anderson. PCS UT. PCS Rapid City. PCS UT. PCS Westover AFB 1970. 2 additional TDYs to Anderson. Finaly had enough and quit when they tried to send me back to Texas in 1974.I forgot to mention a few other TDYs stateside But I can't remember all of them.I suppose senility is setting in.
w.l(willie) perdue <W1PERDUE@AOL.COM.>
Roanoke, VA USA -
It's a little late, but the 47th Bomb Wing reunion is at Arl ington Va. from the 4th to the 8th Oct. Bomb/Nav, The Best PJ Turner Msgt. Ret.
PJ Turner <pturn@pokynet.com>
Pocahontas , Ar USA -
Am looking for a harry pickering stationed at Kesler air base plumbing shop around 1969. He lived in mississippi
Tlmmy G. Conley <delores@usnsb.net>
New Smyrna Beach, Fla USA -
I added some new movies on page 17 of the images. Hopefully I can get more done here soon. Jon
Jon
USA -
4 days after the WTC tragedy, I got a call from Dave Brien, an old D-model troop now living in Ireland. What a great time for a call from an old friend.
Mike Nowak <mnowak1@peoplepc.com>
Redford, Mi USA -
Left Lowry Dec 1965, Griffiss 1965 to 66, Ellsworth 66 to 68, tdy guam Jan 68 to July 68, PCS utapao 1969, Westover 70 to 71. Went back tdy to U tapao for 52 days,Kinchloe AFB, 71 to 72, Seymour Johnson AFB 72 to 73, PCS to U Tapao 73 to 74, Went TDY to Guam From u Tapao for 6 months then went to Carswell AFB 74 to 76 got out in 76
Earl D Polly <EDPOLLY@bellsouth.net>
Orlando , Fl USA -
Lowery '82, then Minot 5th AMS till '86 - flight line then field shop. Like the buff's, did not like Minot. Maybe we will use them again over Afghanistan?
Brookie <grapeman600@yahoo.com>
OH USA -
Great to see a lot of Bomb nav troops still around. I was at Lowery from 74 till 75 then Blythville till 77. I got out for a year. I came back in in 77 and went to Mather then to Minot in 85 did one year in Guam and then retired at Minot in 95. Now work for the Post Office as an Electronic Tech.
Heber Armer <Heber55@aol.com>
Chana, IL USA -
BombNav troop from 1955 until 1975 . stationed at dyess afb,341A&E, 96th A&E.B-47E, B-52E, good ole Guam.. Then 319th A & E at GrandForks N.D. then 2nd AMS at Barksdale AFB, good ole Guam Bulletshot,Ut, then, 8th AMS ubon thai with F-4 Es, then back to barksdale and the G's again. Retired 1975, seems like ages ago but you never for get the aircraft or the fine men I had a chance to serve and work and fly with.. Still miss working on Bomb/Nav system and would love to hear from any one interested..congrats to the young airmen that have kept the old buff flying in the 26 years that I have been gone from the flight line. Sincerely, just an old fart bombnav man. G.W. Harris,Shreveport La.( trike700@aol.com )
gerald w. harris <trike700@aol.com>
shreveport, la USA -
BombNav troop from 1955 until 1974 . stationed at dyess afb,341A&E, 96th A&E.B-47E, B-52E, good ole Guam.. Then 319th A & E at GrandForks N.D. then 2nd AMS at Barksdale AFB, good ole Guam Bulletshot,Ut, then, 8th AMS ubon thai with F-4 Es, then back to barksdale and the G's again. Retired 1975, seems like ages ago but you never for get the aircraft or the fine men I had a chance to serve and work and fly with.. Still miss working on Bomb/Nav system and would love to hear from any one interested..congrats to the young airmen that have kept the old buff flying in the 26 years that I have been gone from the flight line. Sincerely, just an old fart bombnav man. G.W. Harris,Shreveport La.( trike700@aol.com )
gerald w. harris <trike700@aol.com>
shreveport, la USA -
you're right about the computer literacy of our age group where's guys like charlie white, john laylon, hank koppa, bobby jordan, john shagen, bill robinson, billy thompson, bob swisher, etc.
al hall <minkey1@netzero.com>
carencro, la USA -
I ran the C-11C instrument trainer a Clinton Sherman from April, 1967 until June, 1968 and still have many fond memories of the 70th.
John L. Hackert <jhackert@cityusa.net>
Schenectady, NY USA -
This is a great site. I dont know if the old bomb nav troops aren't computor literate or what. I went to the Sac museum at Lincoln Neb. They have a b52 simulator with the old T/A scopes and control panel. They also have the bomb nav system used on the D models in Vietnam. At least I think its that one. Still like to hear from old friends from Clinton Sherman AFB 62 to 65. from the bomb nav section or A&E Squadron
Tom Smithson
Green Bay, Wi USA -
test
test
USA -
One more test to make sure it still works.
Jon
USA -
There I was at 40,ooo feet hanging by my throat mike. Sure good to hear all those ward stories. I retrained into bombnav in'59 and went to Chenault, La to the old 44 bomb wing. Their moto was burn em instead of fixing them. Seams like a '47 jumped the chocks when the ATO went from random voltage. Went to the 68th bomb wing when the shut down the 44th. Had to spend my last year in Glasgow, Mont when they closed Chenault. would love hearing from my old buddies. I rdetired in 64. Dave Laney Peterplink@AOL.Com
Dave Laney
USA -
Browsing the B/N site,noticed theres not many of us old B/RB-47 troops on it. Went K school Lowry AFB 54,stationed Altus AFB Okla, 96th moved to Dyess AFB Tex. sept 57,transferred to 55thSRW Forbes AFB Kans,worked on the RB-47H,ASQ-51 system,ERB-47E,MA7A system and RB-47K,MA7A sys,APS-64 radar,except K model had a 5 inch radar scope,transferred to Offutt with 55th.Went back to Dyess on the B-52F,never worked on the bird,got screwed and put directly into Job control,2 years latter transferred to KI Sawyer,screwed again,transferred to Barksdale,went in Bomb nav.section lasted about 5 months,guess who got screwed again.Retireed in May 74.
ljmcgaha
USA -
The guest book is back up!!!!!! Finally!! Jon
Jon
USA -
Found you site by accident looking for information on the old Utapoa AFB. I,m not a Bomb/nav guy but I did my time on the "D"s and the "H" models as a jet engine mechanic. I was at Wurtsmith from 69 to the end of 1971 then Utapoa from Jan 1972 to Jan 73. Just reading some of the stories really brought back the good old days even thought they were 30 years ago. The only time i can even get close to a Buff is when the wife and I do a road trip to Ohio. Keep up the good work and if anyone has pictures of Utapoa I wouldn,t mind seeing them. Also I went back to Wurtsmith last fall and most of the base is still there but no Buffs or tankers are there anymore. Thanks again Bob
Bob Bremer <robertbremer@hotmail.com>
Holland, Mi USA -
Greetings and I am glad to see that Bomb Nav still lives. I was a bomb nav 32150L at Fairchild, Anderson, Utapao, and Westover between 1967-1971. As a "Hard Hat" I had many exciting experiences with "Snake" Garner (see his comments)during missions in SEA. Today, I am project leader for the restoration of a B52D serial number 55-095 which is on display in the Octave Chanute Aerospace Museum, old Chanute AFB, Rantoul, Illinois. We are seeking / asking for help to complete this restoration. We would like any pictures, uniforms, equipment, technical manuals, oral histories, etc. Anything that will help us restore the nose section. You could donate them to the museum or loan them to us to copy etc and then we would return them to you. Our web site is www.aeromuseum.org. It was dream of our old Utapao and Chanute CG, MG Frank Elliot (deceased) to have this restored and on display. Chanute has been renamed since the Air Force left. It is now "Elliott Field". Bomb nav forever. dr. doug rokke aka: "The Flying Squirrel" dlind49@aol.com 217-643-6205
doug rokke <dlind49@aol.com>
Rantoul, Illinois USA -
Started Bomb-Nav in 54 at Keesler (Q-24)..Went to Harlingen to work on T-29s for 3 1/2 years. Took early out.. Came back in in91 days. Went back to Keesler for more T-29 work. Shipped out to RAF Sculthorp to work on B-66B after retrainig into K-5 at the local MTD unit...Yes, Virginia, TAC used bombing systems on the B-45 & 66. Left there after the base was closed in 62 and went to Whiteman to finish closing up the 340th A&E. Then retrained into the Minuteman Missile as a BMAT and then finally into the missile trainers. After reading Bob Zellners note...there may be a discrepancy as to the mfg of the Q-24..He says it was Westinghouse...I'm pretty sure it was Western Electric (WECO)
Jack Katchmarik <popskc_36@yahoo.com>
Kansas City, Mo USA -
I was an RN with the 46th Bomb Squadron at Grand Forks from 1973 until I got out in 1978. I also spent about three months in a "D" model in Thailand. Great to have a way to touch base with some of the old "crew dogs".
Dick Larson <dick_larson@bobcat.com>
Lisbon, ND USA -
Bomb/Nav Barksdale '81-91 in 2AMS, 2OMS, 596 Bomb Squadron, 96 BS. Spent 5 months TDY at Eglin (88) doing the initial HAVE NAP integration testing on the B-52 then spent 2 years (88-90) with the HAVE NAP test team at Barksdale (DET 2, 31 TES).Was in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia for Desert Storm, launching BUFFs to kill Iraqis. When I got back they tried to make a crew chief out of me :(, crosstrained in 95 to computer programmer, worked on the WST (Weapon System Trainer - Flight Simulator) at Barksdale 96-00. Moved to Robins in 2000 to work JSTARS Flight Simulator issues.
Randy Starnes <James.Starnes@robins.af.mil>
Centerville, GA USA -
Hello from a really old grey haired Bomb Nav airman. Graduated from school Lowry AFB Nov 1955, assigned to 9th Bomb Wing Moutain Home AFB Idaho Dec '55. Had "B" model B-47's Ka-4/Aps 23 radar BNS. Back to Lowry for 7 level '56, somehow got my Bomb computer back together and it worked, but back to flight line, didn't want to be inside in the shop. Replaced with "E" models from Douglas/Tulsa with Ma-7 & APS-64 radar when I returned from Lowry. Still p.o.'d the crew chief when we used the bail out static line to lower and raise the replacement radar indicators. Thanks to First Sgt Denny M Looney for saving my bacon when I missed my flight to Anderson AFB Guam for the advance team to get our alert A/C on the pad so the rotating wing could leave back in October of '57. I remember the lightbulbs in the lockers to keep the green fungus off your shoes, the green powered eggs at the chow hall, the .25 cent Rum & Coke at the Airman's club, and the long walk back to the barracks. Sent to Yakota in Dec with all our planes because of the Thypoon that hit Guam, found out all the fly-away kits still had the old K-4a spares, but all got back o.k. to Anderson. 9th A&E tried new maintenance procedures when we returned, I had 3 airplanes, one from 1st, 5th, & 99th bomb Squadron, instead of one squadron. Stood by for takeoffs, worked the flight squaks only when they flew. Great ides, except I will never forget 52-00191, blue tail 5th bomb Squadron, real dog Bomb Nav- wise, spent a lot of time with her. Got relieved of duty when I told C.O. I wasn't going to re-up. Next day went on night shift de-briefing Bomb Nav systems. Dischaged Dec 1958, hired in Boeing-Wichita Feb of '59, pre-flighting and working delivery flight squaks for B-52 G model ASB-9 BNS, Doppler Redar, AstroTracker celestial Navigation System, and IFF transponder. Transfered to Electonics Lab for "H" model production, loading test bench to functional test and align ASB-9A and Low Altitude Terrain Avoidance Radar. Took 10 days with North American Autonitics engineers to align the 1st TA computer; at end of pruduction run we loaded, tested, aligned, and unloaded a complete system every 3rd day. Got some great pictures of a Kansas tornado one night while checking the IBDA light sequence in the main radar indicator, lots of littl twisted tail blips on the film when it came back from photo lab; but of course because of security had to destroy the film. After B-52 production run was transfered to Modification Planning for retrofit on older models, transfered to commercial prodduction in '65. Moved to Seattle, worked many different areas of 707,727, 737, 747, 757, 767, 777, retiring in July '95. Got a motorhome and winter in Phoenix from November to May or June. I quit going on the Davis-Monathan tour, brings the blood to my eyes and barfs me out seeing the S.O.B.'s chopping up the few remaining B-52's; General Lemay must be turning over in his grave, probably call him "pinwheel" Lemay. Thanks for a great site, any old 9th A&E troops out there Henery Baker, Sal Belanti, John Klefisch, Bob Tyler, Sgt Denny M. looney, I salute you, we spent a lot of time together, never knowing if it was the real thing or not. R.I.P S.A.C.; we were the best!
Anthony F. (Tony) Ascanio <tobaras@msn>
Bothell, wa USA -
Hey-where are all the Q24 and K5 troops out there? Bomb/Nav from 54 to 75 on B45s ,T29s and B66s,Sculthorpe,Toul Rosieres,Takhli,James Connally and Mather, retired Msgt. P J Turner
P J Turner <pturn@pokynet.com>
Pocahontas, Ar USA -
Autopilot shop at Blytheville AFB (97 AMS) from Jan 82 to Sep 85....cheers to the Bomb Nav guys!
Paul Boley <pboley@rocketmail.com>
Soto Cano AB, Honduras -
Since all of us "old" Bomb Nav troops served under the SAC shield, I thought this might be an interesting site: http://www.strategic-air-command.com/
Tom Colen <razorback71740@email.com>
Tinker AFB, OK USA -
Went to school for 321X0K at Lowry in '62, the year of the earthquakes. Assigned to 42nd A&E, Loring AFB. Sure do miss the BUFFs. I actually saw one of the birds that was assigned to Loring at an air show here at Dobbins AFB years ago. Jack Donnelly
Jack Donnelly <jedonn@nortelnetworks.com>
Marietta, GA USA -
Cross trained from ground radar school at Kesler field, Biloxi,Ms in 1957 to Bomb Nav at Biggs AFB in 1958. Was shipped to Anderson AFB in Guam for 18 mo. Left Guam in January 1961. Looking for some old buddies.
Royce D. Johnson <rjohnson@bayou.com>
West Monroe, La USA -
I was a member of the 97th A&E at biggs AFB from 1957 thru 1959. Also a member of the 42 nd A&E at Loring AFB from early 59 until early 60. Anyone from those squadrons out there?
Marty Mintz <mgmintz@pacbell.net>
Foster City, Ca USA -
I was in Bomb/Nav from 1959-1963 at Beale AFB in A&E .Looking for comm/nav, auto/pilot, photo shop ,Bomb/Nav & fms personnel.I trying to find some old buddies??
Pete peterson <Sierra1012@prodigy,net>
Boise, Id USA -
K. I. Sawyer '72-3. Can't remember much after being out since 1974.
Dan Lapham <lapham3@aol.com>
Hopkins, Mn USA -
Hi: I'm a retired 32170L and 32170K BombNav Troop. First Base as Altus AFB, OK (Jan 59 - Jun 63). Got out of the service, but two years later came back into BombNav. Was sent to Seymour Johnson. Late 65 to 67. At that time was volunteered to crosstrain to the K system. Went Pease AFB, C and D model Buffs, tdy to Guam got my first pcs to Utapao 68-69. 69- 71 at Westover AFB. Got out of C&D's and sent to Robins AFB. 71-73. Of course while there wing went TDY to Guam. From there my second PCS to Utapoa 73 -74. 74 to 80 was at Barksdale. Then in Jul 80 left the hot south and went north, clear to Grand Forks. In Sep 87, finally retired. The base was converting to B-1's. At least my entire tour was in S A C !!!!! From 68 to 87 I primarily worked with MADREC, you guys remeber uploading, downloading recorders, meeting the aircraft to pull the magazines out. I live in Wichita, KS thats my home.\ DWebster1@kscable.com
Donald Webster <DWebster1@kscable>
wichita, ks USA -
20 years in AF(65-85). All but one year in SAC. Photos bring back memories. Don't recognize the new stuff at all. claim to fame: Created the "Bomb Nav Squadron" at Mather AFB and beat the F111's at Bomb Comp
Jim Skinner <skinner@nc.rr.com>
clayton, NC USA -
-COMM NAV: 98 CAMS, Barksdale AFB 88-90 -Minuteman II/III Missile Launch Officer: 490 MIS/341 OSS, Malmstrom AFB 92-94 -E-3 Nav/Instructor Nav: 965 AACS, Tinker AFB 95-00 -B-52 Radar Nav: 96 BS, Barksdale AFB 00-?? Great website! Your pictures are already gracing the covers of my pubs. Keep up the awesome work.
Steve Baxter <afnav@msn.com>
Sleazeport, LA USA -
Thank You! Lowrey 61, McConnell 63, Pease 65, Glasgow 68
Chris Veihl <cveihl@stny.rr.com>
Horseheads, NY USA -
Thank You
Chris Veihl <cveihl@stny.rr.com>
Horseheads, NY USA -
While cruzing the net, I somehow found your site.
Tim Pashly
San Diego, California USA -
I started in apr 75' at Grand Forks, went to Wurtsmith in 80' and then Edwards in 85' and retired in 94'. Had a lot of fun at all the time.
Richard Mitchell <bonbnav@aol.com>
Dodgeville, WI USA -
Just stumbled onto this site. Great. B/N type. G's at Loring [42ns AMS]Mar 71 thru Mar 72. Then X-trained into SRAM. Big Mistake. When asked to reup I stated I would if I could get back into B/N. but no luck. Was at Lowry June 70 thru Mar 71. In the 11th Sqnd I think. Too many years you know. Anyone feel free to drop me a line. LIZ was a cold place but the people were ooutstanding.
George R. Mogle <gsmog@epix.net>
Chambersburg , Pa USA -
Hm. Vanover. I seem to remember a Vanover stationed with me at Dyess 83-84. I was Lowry 82-83, Dyess 83-84, Andersen 84-86, Blytheville 86-87. Looking back, I guess PCS was my middle name :)
Allen Kitchen <allenk@blkbox.com>
Houston, tx USA -
Hi B/N troops. I was in bomb/nav for over twenty years. Finished K-Systems Series in 1954 at Denver, Co. Shipped out to Hunter Field in Savannah,Ga.They had just changed over to B47's from B50's. I was stationed there until December of 1961. While there I was Tdy to North Africa,Sidi, twice for 90 days and several times jusy in and out to ger flying time as we were reflexing over there. Reflexed to England,also severasl tdy's to Mcdill, and Mccoy for SES. Was on most every Bombing Competition from 1958 until it was stopped for awhile in the late sixties becaus of the Vietnam War.I went from Hunter Field to Turner AFB at Albany Ga.a B52 base and spent five years there except for tdy's < six weeks at Westover, AFB for NCO acamedy in January & February of 1965. Then Jun-Sept at Lackland AFB wrighting the 3,5 &7 level test for all the B/N systems. In March of 1966 we were in the Herd that was shot around the world."Bullet Shot'. Was tdy to Guam returning in Sept was home two days and went to Fairchild AFB for Bomb Comp. Returned to turner after two weeks and was home two days and went to Westovewr AFB 8th AF headquaters for a bomb comp conference for 1967. Returned to Turner and was home two weeks and was sent to Columbus AFB in Ms to begin the change over from "F" model to"D" model B52's. After the change over we went back to Guam for six months.Flyin 30 sorties a day. Most all the B/N troops that wanted to was on flying status flying Hard Hat. I was on a mission on the &th of July 1967 flying close interval bombing runs and the lead A/C radar went out and the aircraft on our right wing was going to assume lead and was to drop down 50 feet and the lead was to raise 50 feet and they were to slide into each others position, to keep from loosing the drop time since we had to drop within 10 seconds of schedule or go secondary,we were flying 150 feet behind the lead and 150 feet between wing tips of #2 as they attempted to change positions they collided. I was in the I/P seat and the copilot banked left hard and the explosion of something, a big fireball flip us over and made a complete roll. All electrical power was lost after resetting the power and got enter comm back luckly no one had bailed out. The tail gunner said he saw seven chutes. We found out later all seven was picked up. We assessed our damage and decided to go on up north and drop on our secondary target afterwards climing out to 45m an returned to Guam after thirteen and one half hours after takeoff. After our return to CAFB, MS we were home a few months and returned to Guam again for the usual six months. After returning this time I shipped out to Fairchild AFB,who had just relieved us on Guam, When I got to Fairchild and got my family in Base Housing They sent me to Guam. this was in 1968. We went back again in 1969. After arriving back I got orders to Thailand UT AFB. Spent one year there. Was sent to Robbins Afb in Ga because they had "G"models and wasn't supposed to go to the Vietnan war. After arriving there I had orders after four months to go back to Guam. They were increasing sorties and sent "G" models over. I went twice yo Gaum with Robbins. The War ended or at least the quit bombing in December of 1972 After 200 sorties a night over Hanoi for eleven night. We lost 16 B52's the first two nights. After that none. After all of this I returned to Mississippi and got a job with the Postal Service and retired again in 1994. Have been doing a lot of traveling since. We have a "D" model reunion every other year. We just had one in Sept. at Pegion Forge. Most all of the old "D" model guys that was stationed at Turner attend.Maybe some of the Guys that have a scanner can send you some of the pictures from the reunions. Guess you are tired of reading my Airforce History so I'll stop for now.Talk about old B?N troops, it's been almost 50 years since I became one and I enjoyed every minute of it. Bomb Nav was the best in SAC and most any of the air crews would agree.
Wayne"Snake"Garner <waynenms@bully.net>
Aberdeen, Ms USA -
Great site!!! Keeps the true Bomb-Nav spirit alive since we were forced to merge with Com Nav. Keep the radios and let us do ou stuff!!!!!
David J Woodley <blackwolf@ccis.com>
Boron, ca USA -
GRADUATED FROM ASB-4/ASQ38 SYSTEMS AT LOWRY FEBRUARY 1960. ASSIGNED TO 4238 SW, BARKSDALE AFB ON B-52F'S. WENT ON FLYING STATUS AFTER GETTING 32150K LEVEL AS A2C. SPENT ALL MY TOUR AT BARKSDALE EXCEPT FOR ONE RON AT BLYTHEVILLE. WENT TDY TO LITTLE ROCK FOR THE ALTITUDE CHAMBER AND ALSO TO KELLY FOR ACR ALIGNMENT HANDS ON WITH FACTORY FOLKS. MSGT LONNIE WOODARD WAS MY SHOP CHIEF. HE WAS KILLED ON A B-52G THAT CRASHED NEAR STONE LAKE, WISCONSIN IN 1965. I WAS DISCHARGED IN JULY 1963. CURRENTLY AM A CMSGT WITH THE 910th AW, YOUNGSTOWN AIR RESERVE BASE, OHIO. WILL RETIRE IN FEBRUARY 2001. BOMB/NAV WAS THE BEST!!!
FRED DOUBLE <FPOODERDOO@AOL>
BRISTOLVILLE, OH USA -
Crossed trained from ground radio maint. Jan 1959 FTD @ Little Rock AFB, Ark. 384th BW B47E. Transfer Westover AFB, Mass. Jun 1962 99th BW B52C/D. Crossed trained PMEL JUN 1967.
Chuck Robb <charles.robb@ae.ge.com>
USA -
Great site. I was at Lowry AFB 86-87 then on to Carswell untill 91. Didn't know how good we had it did we!
Rob Gullett <rob@4amotor.com>
Pennington Gap, VA USA -
This is my site and I just realized that I have not added anything here. I came in the USAF as Bomb Nav 321X0 in Oct 1986. I was at Lowry AFB between 28 Nov 1986 til early June 1987. I arrived at Blytheville AFB ready to go to work on the AN/ASQ-176 OAS with MACR radar. We had B-52Gs, which were not slated to receive STRAT RADAR, where I worked in the Specialist Section of the 97th OMS. I quickly discovered that if you knew radar and TA it would put you on top of the heap, keep you out of crappy airmen jobs. So I set out to learn TA for a SSgt Rick Jones (GUMBY) as well as a few others (John Gillete, Cal Reves and Al Limon to name a few). I guickly got my 5 Level and SAC Journeyman badge and did my first TA ALignment (SOLO) as an A1C. That was the start of a lot of weekends and holidays in the TA dock. I spent Desert Storm at Griffiss AFB shoveling snow and providing MACR radar support while they were away. Shortly there after we heard the news of Eaker AFB's (formly Blytheville) closure. At the time I was glad to be leaving Hooterville and ending the long 12 hour days working on Radar. I went to Fairchild next (Christmas 1992) and was introduced to AN/APQ-166 STRAT radar, a system designed for monkeys to work on. I was at FAFB when the hostile takeover came. SAC was dead and we were not ACC (TAC). It was off to Barksdale AFB in 1994 after Fairchild was realigned as a AMC tanker base. I have been in the 96th Bomb Squadron ever since. Been around the world several times (DESERT STRIKE, SOUTHERN WATCH), pulled two tours to Deigo Garcia etc etc. I now realize that STRAT RADAR was the final stake in the heart of BOMB NAV. So I started this site to keep the faith alive. Bomb Nav forever!!! Com Nav sucks!!!!
Jonathan Vanover <bombnav@bombnav.org>
Bossier City, LA USA -
Nice to find some old Bomb/Nav people. I was at Lowry from 1966-67 then on to Mather AFB from 1967-70. B-52F & G's in 68 (G's replaced the F's). Great aircraft and better memories.
Duncan Fields <tridunc@hotmail.com>
Coral Springs, Fl USA -
I was assigned to the 7th Avionics Maintenance Squadron (7AMS) at Carswell AFB from June through December, 1970, in the Fire Control (Defensive Fire Control Systems) shop. I would like to locate my supervisor, TSgt Vance Williams, or anyone else who worked in the shop.
Thomas P. Dougherty <ssgtthomasp@hotmail.com>
Chula Vista, CA USA -
Damn the SAM's - Center the PDI !!! Tech School in Denver in 1963-64. 22 + years as a 321X0L. Went to work at Boeing as a Tech Rep after retirement. Did my last B-52 work in 1997 down at Barksdale.You would think that I'd get tired of 'dem BUFF's !!
Jack Simko <simkoj@msn.com>
Derby, KS USA -
OK, So I was married to the 1st female bomb-nav troop at Carswell(74-76) but that was several wives ago. Went to Guam back to Carswell then had the enjoyment of 11 winters at Loring, trying to defend the D's..retired in 92 and got a BS in Chemistry and Microbiology. Worked several yrs in the mining industry. Now I'm a stockbroker and enjoying middle age. Hope to hear from some of the D-dogs. BND=DSA
Ray Newhouse <gunrb52@aol.com>
Glendale , AZ USA -
Bomb/Nav..72-81, B-52 guy..forever. Hi to all, yes I can still do TA alignments in my sleep, currently working the plan to get the BUFF to 2040. Hooterville, all the fun you can have and still not spend more than a couple of hours in AF prision for shooting your cannon during retreat.
Robert W.P. (Stainless) Steele <robert.w.steele2@boeing.com>
Wichita , KS USA -
I went through bomb/nav tech school at Lowry from Oct68 to Jul69. I was stationed at March and started working on the E Models until Oct69. At that time I was sent to Carswell and cross-trained to the L shreadout so I could work on D's. I also got to fly as a hardhat from Guam in 72. Wouldn't trade the experience for anything! Bomb/nav was always the best in SAC. Don't miss the TDY's, but then I knew many who spent a lot more time at it than I did.
Gregg Weston <gregg.weston@otak.com>
Lake Oswego, OR USA -
Hi all you B/N grunts.I was Bomb/Nav from 1950 to 1954. Elect. Fundamentals and Q-24 school at Keesler from 11/50 to 6/51 and then to Rapid City (now known as Ellsworth, he was the wing CO then). Worked Q-24 on RB-36 until 9/52, then went to FTD at Carswell to learn K-Systems. Went to Limestone, Maine (later known as Loring AFB) in 4/53 and worked K-System on B-36 until discharge in 8/54. I went to work for IBM in 3/55 and became a tech rep on the Q-38 system. I spent a few months at the Boeing Wichita plant and spent a year or so at Altus, OK, Seymour Johnson, NC, Clinton-Sherman, OK, Beale, CA, and K.I.Sawyer, MI. I gave it up in 1962 and went back to our home plant in Owego, NY and worked on the A-7 D/E aircraft program on the Nav/Weapon Delivery System, which was a digitized Bomb/Nav. I still think a lot about the old days, one memory that still tickles me is the day the first B-36 landed at Limestone. A big reception committee was waiting, including the 2nd AF CO, and when the AC landed the main gear parking brakes were locked. The AC screeched to a halt on the runway and all the crew jumped out the hatches. It sure ruined the reception ceremony.
Bob Zellner <rzellner@juno.com>
Mechanicsburg, PA USA -
BombNAVVVVV! Just found the site and I think it's great. I was stationed at Carswell from 1987 thru late 89. Love the images keep up the good work.
Arthur (Elbow) Ealba <aealba@4k-e.com>
Los Angeles, CA USA -
I found out right after taking the tests at Sampson AFB I was going to go to K School in Denver Colorado. We had to get a Secret security clearance. Two of us were selected from our basic flight for K school. Arrived at Lowry in Oct 1953 and graduated in April 54. I was assigned to the 4244th Flying Training Wing at Pinecastle AFB in Orlando Florida. When we arrived in Florida the Air Training Command was finishing up transition classes for pilots transitioning from B-29s to B-47s. In May 1954 the training was completed and the training aircraft were turned over to the newly formed 321st Bomb Wing, our squadron then changed name to the 321st A&E. Wing commander was Michael N.W. McCoy He had been the commander of the 306th Bomb WIng and had taken the first aircraft delivery of B-47s to the AF. Our work was cut out as the K Systems had not been used during the training classes and everything had to be taken out inspected and repaired. Realigned and put back in the aircraft. I can remember long nights with piles of amplifiers from the SAU and CAU and running them through the test equipment to measure the output. By Oct 1954 we were ready for our first test, a TDY to Fort Campbell Kentucky. After that experience was glad I was in the Air Force Army chow was terrible. Having successfully completed our test we were ready for our first big TDY, 90 days at Lakenheath England. Boy was that cold after Florida. Our next TDY was to Sidi Slimani French Morrocco. I went on many USO tours on the weekends and saw a lot of the country. Completed my enlistment as a S/Sgt with a primary AFSC of 32170E. My last re-up talk was with Col McCoy in August 1957, Col McCoy was killed in a B-47 accident in Oct. 57 during Bombing Comp. The 321st went on to win the bombing comp that year, a fitting tribute to their fallen commander. Pinecastle was renamed to McCoy AFB and is now Orlando's airport. Your luggage to Orlando will carry the airport code of MCO for old Mike McCoy. After the AF went to college and got a Masters degree and spent 31.5 years working for IBM. I'm still working at IBM as a contractor.
Ben P. Fisher, Jr. <fisherb@azstarnet.com>
Corona, AZ USA -
I started Bomb-Nav tech school in Denver Colorado January 1974 and arrived at Carswell AFB Fort Worth Texas June 1974. My class included Paul "Arnold Ziffle" Pitzer, Mike Hollis, Mike Anderson, Doug Kratz and Kent Knoll. All but Hollis and Knoll went to Carswell. I worked on the AN/ASQ48 system on B-52D's until August 1978. I never left Texas. I am now a Computer Consultant in Fort Worth Texas.
Carm Vecchio <c.vecchio@worldnet.att.net>
Aledo, TX USA -
served in the 70bomb wing at clinton sherman afb ok. from 62-65.this brings back many fond memories. I would like to hear from any of the guys I served with. Richard W. Ferguson, Russ Katzer. Bill Forrester, Tom Zarek. the acr alignments were a real adventure. Flying in those Buffs was a lot of fun if you didnt have problems to work on. the low level flights especially.
tom smithson <bsmit25308@aol.com>
green bay, wi USA -
just another "old" SAC Crewdog, missing the good ol' days of the Cold War. Mather '87, Castle '88, Fairchild '88-'92, then RIFed. Selective Service for 6 yrs, now PA with 107MDS, NFARS, NY.
Mark T Orlowski, RPA-C <morlowsk@daemen.edu>
Buffalo, NY USA -
have e-mailed most of the people on the guestbook way older than most except for ed buysse whose memory i'm trying to jog. d models the only true war bird 128 500 pounders per sortie synopsis westover 58/59, bergstrom 59/66, fairchild 66/67/68, utapao 68/69,carswell 69, pease 69/73 f111, sac/lgma 73/77 f111, b1a you guys can thank me for getting rid of the madrec staffed the pins and the ryan doppler on the 135's put the first spn/geans on a g model at barksdale for a years worth of flt. test ret 1977 when jimmy carter canx the b1a and the e4b wish there was more i come back tomorrow for a good war. keep the faith...
Al Hall (Alfie) <pop62@altavista.com>
Carencro, La USA -
D-Model,7th AMS Carswell, May78-Dec81. Lowrey Sep77-May78 Hi Mike Nowak. It would be nice if a few others signed in. Tim Bentley, Gary Lee, Jake Beyers, Brian Kerr, Chuck Jung, Jim Dobbs, Mark Lavimonier, Dave Hemeon, Sgt Simko, Phil Soulders. John Wenzel. JP, Louis Aceavido(sp?), Glenn Thomas. Nancy Flynn. Alsbrooks, my roomate from Brooklyn, during the Red Sox fade of 78. The names are fading, but I still have at least one memory of you Mike. My first time on the flightline, I went with you and turned on the radar, without waiting for the 5 minute standby. You said, "Don't they teach you guys anything in Tech School?" Funny what comes back after all of these years. I remember that you had a red car, can't remember the make. How about working and sweating in the plane and coming off to the 110 degree flightline and thinking how cool it felt, compared to the oven you just came out of? That great smell, when you went inside. How it shook, when they tested the engines. Still wish I could have flown in it once. Glad to have served in Bomb/Nav on the D model. One of the most challenging jobs in the USAF. Too bad that they retired it and also closed Carswell. I still have civillian friends in Fort Worth, and have been back at least a dozen times in the last 19 years. Now I'm married with 4 children, and work as an project engineer at http://www.adaptivenetworks.com/ My son is a Army Medic at Fort Bragg, and eats at Pope AFB when he can. He says they stopped midnight chow in the AF, because it was only for Airmen on duty, but was abused. I told him that we used to put on our wrinkled uniforms after watching Saturday Night Live and go to the chow hall and get those great 5 or 6 egg omletts. (I still can't believe he joined the Army.) 9/29/2000
Don Orrell <dono01@aol.com>
Mansfield, MA USA -
32150L - 76-80. Any Carswell/Anderson troops out there?
Mike Nowak <mnowak40@excite.com>
Redford, Mi USA -
Talk about a "Old" Bomb Nav Troop. I was in the late and great K-System on RB-47s back in 1955-1960 at Lockbourne AFB, Ohio. Anyone remember the 91st A&E ? If anyone from that Squadron is still around, feel free to contact me.
Tom Clinard <tmc@hitter.net>
Dunnellon, Fl USA -
Greetings: I am collecting information and ideas (and of course $$$) for the restoration of a B52 "D" model 55-075 nose section which is located in the Octave Chanute Aeropsace Museum in Rantoul, Illinois. I was a Bomb Nav Hard Hat from 1967- 1971. Any help (suggestions, artifacts, stories, help)would be appreciated. This is a hands-on exhibit where museum visitors can actually climb into and sit at the controls of a B52. thanks, doug rokke 217-643-6205
Dr. Doug Rokke <prokke@aol.com>
Rantoul, Il USA -
Just found the web page and well.....it has been a few years since my instructor days at Lowry. Hope someone out there remembers those long school days.
Keith Amburgey <keith.amburgey@schriever.af.mil>
USA -
Hi - I'm another old time bomb-nav troop. I started tech school June of 1973 and was sent to Blytheville then Castle, and then K.I.Sawyer before going to the B-1B OAS test team at Edwards. I was then sent to McConnell AFB to bed down the last B-1 MOB. I also help set up Whiteman for the B-2. Now retired in Wichita Please feel free to contact me
maverick <maverick@kscable.com>
USA -
Hi - I'm another old time bomb-nav troop. I started tech school June of 1973 and was sent to Blytheville then Castle, and then K.I.Sawyer before going to the B-1B OAS test team at Edwards. I was then sent to McConnell AFB to bed down the last B-1 MOB. I also help set up Whiteman for the B-2. Now retired in Wichita Please feel free to contact me
maverick <maverick@kscable.com>
USA -
Looking for old Bomb/Nav troops. My assignments were K.I.Sawyer 1962-1966, Kinchloe 1966-1967, Columbus AFB Mississippi, 1967-1968, Utapao 1968-1969. Retrained into FB-111 Pease AFB NH 1969-1972. Instructor Lowry AFB 1972-1975.
Ed Buysse <Ebuysse@aol.com>
USA -
Whats up you old dog, yes I am still around..... still at Tinker working on B1's. Dam I hate this so called aircraft, but it is a job. Hey for some good art work go to www.drublair.com, I just got two of his "In praise of older bombers". For everone else I came into the Air Force in 1981 and started on D's as in B52D, and worked on DBNS in Guam, and when we out bombed OAS they reward us by sending the over worked D's to the grave yard and me to Blytheville for 4 years, then back to Guam for about 3 years and then off to Castle for sometime. I then when to Tinker where I am now. Jon whats up with you now ? Long live BOMB NAV.....BOMBS ON TARGET......If you an't Bomb-Nav You an't Shit
"Bob The Slob" Hansen <B52D@yahoo.com>
USA -
Greetings all...Was Bomb Nav at Castle (93 AMS) from 80 to 81! I think I was the first and only cross trainee to work in Bomb Nav BEFORE going to tech school! After Lowry, I reported to Griffiss (416 AMS) to find the Q-38 being replaced by OAS! They also changed the name of the shop from Bomb Nav to OAS!!! Went to Rome Labs after suggesting new STV camera and FLIR scanner in 88. Got out of AF in 90! Love to hear from any old BN rats!! (Remember TA alignments?!?!?!?!)
Mike Hughes <mhughes1@twcny.rr.com>
USA -
Hi, all. I've been in Bomb/Nav for approx 20 years! Started in the 5th AMS at Minot. Did a tour in flight test at the 31 TES at Edwards. My last stop in Bomb Nav was Barksdale. I was in the 20th and the 49th Test Sq. Now I'm working B-2A Defensive Systems (Don't call me ECM!) at Tinker. Bomb Nav FOREVER. Tom Colen
Tom Colen <tomcolen@earthlink.net>
USA -
Feel free to add your story here. Lets here them all. I will be adding a few stories as well as a few TDY stories. Jon
Jonathan Vanover <bombnav@bombnav.org>
Bossier City, LA USA -